Mounting embroidered silk

DaveK

True Grumbler
Joined
Feb 24, 2005
Posts
61
From
Southern Maryland
I have been reading through the threads about different ways to mount silk. Could it be mounted on stretcher bars? I would think that it could be stretched with just silk thread. Any suggestions on this would be really helpful.
 

brian.k

Grumbler
Joined
May 6, 2005
Posts
24
From
san francisco
The problem I've found with stretching silk on bars is that you get very vissible pull lines at your tack points. I find that sewing the embroidery down is more effective. Or, if you realy want to stretch it, I would sew the embroidery to a stronger sub-fabric, then stretch that fabric onto the bars. My two cents..
 

jframe

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Charter Member
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Jan 1, 1997
Posts
4,251
From
Fort Worth, Texas
You could do a static mount. Center the scarf on a piece of acrylic the size of the frame and lay the mat on it.
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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May 19, 2000
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Suburban Central Ohio
It is difficult to give you good answers with so little information. Important details about your project are:
1) How big is it?
2) How old is it?
3) Do the edges have to show?

If you want to mount a new silk scarf, then lacing with fine thread is OK -- especially if the edges don't have to show.

If the edges have to show, then baste it to another piece of fabric, and stretch that.

If you want to mount an old, fragile piece of silk, such as a flag from the Civil War, do not attempt any sort ofd stitching. Even the slightest pull would shatter the silk threads of the weave.

The next issue of PFM is supposed to have an article about mounting old, fragile textiles with edges showing. The fine mesh overlay mount works for almost any size and condition of fabric. Essentially, the textile is sandwiched between sturdy background fabric and a fine mesh fabric overlay. But of course it's not quite that simple.

The magic of this kind of mount is that it maintains slight tension & keeps the textile from moving within the mount. That detail of the method is thoroughly described in the article, with photos.
 
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