• Welcome! You will have to REGISTER a free account, before you can access the system. If you already registered, please LOG IN. (top right)
    If you can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it. If you have questions, feel free to click the CONTACT US link at the bottom of this page.
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.

Weights & Tables

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387
What do you use for weights? Right now, I'm on oversized projects, but feel free to describe any you use. (One of my favorites is Greg's idea of rice in baby socks for hinge weights.)

Past suggestions I recall are the use of acrylic for large projects, (although when I got a sheet big and heavy enough, it turned out to be big and heavy....lol....which meant I couldn't use it) and the use of sanded glass taped together for hinge weights.

As for tables, after using the top of the vacuum press in the wrong way for four years, I've finally decided to heed the received wisdom and stop piling a bunch of heavy stuff on top. Am using Hubby's nifty frame-joining table, but it's awkward juggling this with frame building. (Plus, it's only 48" wide). He's suggested building a table with a weighted lid to apply even pressure, which sounds nice, but also like a bit of overkill. And we wouldn't want it to squish things too much. What do you do for over-sized projects that need to be flattened?
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,246
Books are handy. :D

More than that, fire extinguishers. o_O

If they aren't enough, back the car onto it. :eek:
 

Andrew Lenz Jr.

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Oct 18, 2007
Messages
665
We have commercial leather bag weights in our design area. In the back, we use glass wrapped in multiple layers of paper then shrink-wrapped. We have a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

Andrew
 

troyveluz

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 5, 2007
Messages
813

This is what I use. One set from TruVue and another set I made using some scrap leather & lead pellets :
 

alacrity8

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 22, 2009
Messages
764
At the front counter, we use 1/4" thick 6"x6" glass. None of the image gets blocked while designing.
For hinging, we tend to use leather (filled with sand) weights.
For a large project that needs to sit out under weights for a bit, I tend to use full (or partial) boxes of glass.
If it's small to medium, it can sit in our 500T press.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 30, 1999
Messages
18,940
On the front counter I use glass weights that Crescent sent us years ago. If I need more weight, I use square sample blocks left over from picking out our granite counter tops, padded on the bottom with suede matboard. In the workroom I've got all kinds of different weights, depending on the size and weight I need. I mostly use 1.5 lb. free-weight discs padded on the bottom with fabric covered matboard discs. For holding photos in small mat openings for hinging, I made weights out of 2"x2" plastic boxes from The Container Store, filled with lead shot and glued shut, padded on the bottom with suede matboard. For heavier weighting, I have a number of different Heavy Things, including 36" MDF boards.
:cool: Rick
 

monkey

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jun 20, 2011
Messages
324
I like using reams of copy paper. I would lay down a sheet of old acrylic and than spread the ream of paper evenly around. Find it really easy and ensured I never run out of paper.
 

David Hewitt

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Messages
399
We do a lot of mounting strainers on artworks that we put on di-bond, gator board, whatever. We have solid bricks wrapped in mat board or fabric to hold in place till the glues are dry. If we put weights on the face of something we will cover it first in left over mountcor liners, then a sheet of heavy glass to even the weight, and protect the surface from indentions, then the bricks.
 

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387
We do a lot of mounting strainers on artworks that we put on di-bond, gator board, whatever. We have solid bricks wrapped in mat board or fabric to hold in place till the glues are dry. If we put weights on the face of something we will cover it first in left over mountcor liners, then a sheet of heavy glass to even the weight, and protect the surface from indentions, then the bricks.
I love MountCor liner paper. It's so handy! Use it for lots of things.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,803
Great!! That photo now has me wanting to go get some Whoopie Pies!!!!


chocolate-whoopie-pies-020117.jpg
 
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

wpfay

Angry Badger
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Sep 1, 2000
Messages
10,736
How big do you want? I've flattened things between 2 sheets of 48X96 foamboard taped together. Nice thing about that is you don't tie up a bench top while you are waiting. I have a hallway just long enough to store 48X96 whatever on edge, so the folder with the art goes there until the frame is ready. I protect the art as needed with glassine or tissue. I also have some pretty large diameter mailing tubes and won't hesitate to backroll a piece that has been stored rolled. I also have a bench with a 40X60 piece of 1/4" plate glass on it for cooling dry mounts and flattening smaller items.
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Messages
2,679
My favourite weights were some old ballasts from flouro lights with strips of card stuck to them. I still used another piece of card under them to protect the artwork on the "braces and a belt" principle.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 30, 1999
Messages
18,940
My favourite weights were some old ballasts from flouro lights with strips of card stuck to them. I still used another piece of card under them to protect the artwork on the "braces and a belt" principle.
A similar, somewhat smaller version of that is the batteries from emergency exit lights, which seem to need replacing about once a year.
:cool: Rick
 

MnSue

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 18, 2005
Messages
1,716
I cut 4 - 24" X 3" strips of acrylic.
used clear silicone to attach a pair of the strips
when dry, sanded the edge and rounded the corners
added felt bumpers...
and now I have a pair of clear acrylic "bars to hold prints, etc down with...

then there is always the wire holders!
 
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

samcrimm

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
229
If your hubby builds you that table and lid, make sure he uses some gas struts to help the lifting part.

Sam
 

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,246
Glass paperweights are good. Almost as if they were made for the job.

 

Philliam Phulgor

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
254
How big do you want? I've flattened things between 2 sheets of 48X96 foamboard taped together. Nice thing about that is you don't tie up a bench top while you are waiting. I have a hallway just long enough to store 48X96 whatever on edge, so the folder with the art goes there until the frame is ready. I protect the art as needed with glassine or tissue. I also have some pretty large diameter mailing tubes and won't hesitate to backroll a piece that has been stored rolled. I also have a bench with a 40X60 piece of 1/4" plate glass on it for cooling dry mounts and flattening smaller items.
The plate glass tops are my favorite. Then, like many have suggested, sheets of plexi or glass boxes. For extra weight, I use big tape dispensers, my frame vises and of course have a couple dozen of the leather bags. Those sometimes I have to politely ask customers (usually male) to please not juggle them. When they fall to the floor the sand can burst out of them.

Here is my favorite:

 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,025
My favourite weights were some old ballasts from flouro lights with strips of card stuck to them. I still used another piece of card under them to protect the artwork on the "braces and a belt" principle.
Wow, we use the ballasts also.;)
It must be an International thing.:cool:

We have about 10 of them from when the lights were upgraded to the newer ones.
We also use a number of the framing bag weights from Roma and LJ.
I've got about 20 of them.
I also use glass boxes as weights for larger pieces or mirrors when we are attaching to strainers.
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Sep 1, 2000
Messages
10,736
Aren't fluorescent ballasts filled with PCBs?
Aren't PCBs considered hazardous materials?
If so, why do you keep them in the shop, and why especially do you take the risk of one of them leaking on to the art?
Am I being overly cautious here? I've had them leak, and it ain't pretty.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387
.... For extra weight, I use big tape dispensers, my frame vises and of course have a couple dozen of the leather bags. Those sometimes I have to politely ask customers (usually male) to please not juggle them. When they fall to the floor the sand can burst out of them.....
Was just reading a chat about weights and still enjoy this post. Timely, too. Just yesterday, a customer fell to the floor and burst. Sand all over.

The real reason for this post is to chat more about weights. Does anyone have a good current source for filled, sewn hinging weights? Preferably leather. I know we could sew some, but oy vey. And thanks to those who posted before. I'll second Wally's note questioning the use of ballasts as weights. The writer of the post referenced is no longer using them, so hopefully, nobody will try it.

Anything new to add?
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,025
Just a note...
We have about 20 leather weights from Roma and LJ.
We also use glass boxes, large scrap plate glass pieces, vises (we have 16 of them) and yes....
We still use fluorescent ballasts.
We have used them for years.
They do not leak, are never placed directly on any artwork and the ones we use contain NO PCB's which were banned 40 years ago...:thumbsup:
Screen Shot 2019-11-23 at 12.27.13 PM.png
Our shop owner is the man who tests CPF's and MCPF's at the WCAF show in Vegas.
He is on the national PPFA competition committee.

We have a tailor shop right next door and they can make more weights if we need them.
It's very handy having them there.
I can use their steam iron when needed and they have every color of thread if we need it.:cool:
 
Last edited:

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,651
Larry you are frikkin' brilliant.

That was hilarious!
 
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

SGJ

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Aug 13, 2018
Messages
1
Was just reading a chat about weights and still enjoy this post. Timely, too. Just yesterday, a customer fell to the floor and burst. Sand all over.

The real reason for this post is to chat more about weights. Does anyone have a good current source for filled, sewn hinging weights? Preferably leather. I know we could sew some, but oy vey. And thanks to those who posted before. I'll second Wally's note questioning the use of ballasts as weights. The writer of the post referenced is no longer using them, so hopefully, nobody will try it.

Anything new to add?
Now as good a time as any for my first post, after reading and learning so much here over the past few months.

I’m in early stages of establishing my small framing business, busy picking up all the bits and pieces required for a fully-functioning workshop.

Until recently, finding a source for the leather paperweights has proven to be a real challenge. I wasn’t able to find them locally (Australia), and the total cost for a few sets of the ALVIN weights from Amazon was nearing $500 AUD. Yikes.

In the end, I came across these beauties from Baroque Portfolios.

I expect to receive them next month, so will be happy to provide a review then.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,025
Those are very similar to the Larson and Roma weights that we have and the price is good.:thumbsup:
I prefer the ones with lead or steel inside, like the ones you have purchased versus the ones with sand inside.
Cheers.
Screen Shot 2019-11-24 at 10.54.41 PM.png shot inside, Screen Shot 2019-11-24 at 10.54.22 PM.png
 
Last edited:

alacrity8

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 22, 2009
Messages
764
For framing, we use the Leather ones from Larson Juhl.
For our front counter weights, we have a stack of 1/4" thick glass, 6" x 6".
 

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387
For framing, we use the Leather ones from Larson Juhl.
For our front counter weights, we have a stack of 1/4" thick glass, 6" x 6".
I design most things on an upright, angled wall display, holding the art on with magnets. Occasionally use a table, though. Made a couple of long glass weights a few years ago. I should bring them upstairs for use at the table.
 

Scallywag

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jan 20, 2011
Messages
221
For big flat works we have some weights that came out of a weight lifting machine. You know, the kind you pull a little pin out of to add weight? They are maybe 20 lbs and 18" x 12" x 1/4" thick. You can probably get an old weight lifting machine at a thrift store for super cheap and take it apart for the weights. Ours have more than paid for themselves.
 
Register for the picture framer's grumble

Joe B

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
5,111
I use the Larson Juhl leather weights. It is about $50.00 for a set of 4, they have a nice weight plus the leather is soft and is easily cleaned if you need to. I have 4 sets for when so I always have a set available if I need them.
 

Dave

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Messages
13,347
Front room I use the LJ and Roma pockets and also two 1 lb. linen wrapped clay squares that my grandmother made back in the '60's. Back room I use more of the same, but also have about 7 of these solid iron weights that are about 20 lbs. each placed on top of 1/4" plexi sheets.


weights.jpg
 

MnSue

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 18, 2005
Messages
1,716
I created some "long" weights
I cut acrylic strips 24-30" long
stacked 3 strips together using E6000
added bumpers on the bottom

Perfect for rolled images...
 

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387
Should add a note that, anytime I use weights on art, I place something in between. Either a square of paper towel or MountCor release paper.
 
Last edited:

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,440
Should add a note that, anytime I use weights on art, I place something in between. Either some paper towel or a square of MountCor release paper. I cut up some of the pull-offs from mounting with it, and this is one use.
Same same except I use flaw board.
 
Register for the picture framer's grumble

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,387

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,440
How could this possibly be? We've always thought you were flawless. :icon21:
Until I get my morning Diet Soda (no coffee for me; not for over 55 years), anything is possible. :faintthud:
 

cjmst3k

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 25, 2006
Messages
4,370
I used one of those leather/leatherette weights on a glossy photo, only to find out it left an orange peel style defect on the photo. I would recommend avoiding those. I've also used shotgun shot or salt inside of plastic bags in baby socks. Those are good. I even made weights out of white cotton gloves with salt inside rubber gloves inside. Those were fun.

I recently had a plastics company custom make a number of circles out of 1/2" acrylic, maybe about 4" circles. I have a stack of those. That's great for diplomas and prints that have been in a tube for a while, and they're flat, easy to see if clean, and stack easily.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,803
I had a friend sew up bags using velvet material and then we filled them with copper shot.
I have 10 of them.
Figured lead not good for my healh and steel shot can rust if any moisture gets on them which might get thru to the art.
 
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.
Top