Wallis sanded pastel paper mount

Mecianne

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Local artist called. Is doing a commissioned pastel on Wallis Museum grade sanded pastel paper (weighty & rough paper). She will be framing for her customer using spacers & a frame only...no mats. Wants to mount the paper to backing board (foam core) before beginning the piece. What's the best & safest way to mount?
 

Cliff Wilson

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What exactly is your concern?

If it is "pre-painting," use fusion.

I've mounted with colormount and fusion and had no trouble. If using a vacume press, you might want to put foam or mat over some release paper. The sanded paper can (will) dig into release board, so a buffer is a good idea.

I have never hurt the sanded paper if that is your concern.

Also, FYI, I have japanese paper hinged sanded paper to a backing board, used spacers and frame only and have had very good luck. I have one of my paintings mounted and framed that way hanging in my condo on Cape Cod (think damp and moist environment) and have seen no problems so far (about 4 years).

Good luck.
 

wpfay

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Another product to consider is the "Restore" board from Bainbridge. Though not tested over time, the short term independent testing seems to support the claims of reversibility.

The only problem I can forsee in any mount is warpage. Without counter mounting the boards all tend to warp from differential permeability.
 

framah

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My pastel artists up here heat mount the paper to 1/2" foam core. This makes it very stable for them to move around especially when they take it outside to work. Cuts down on the warpage as well.
 

Mecianne

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Concerns are that it is large piece--24" x 48"--and the weight of paper & I guess permanence & warping of the mounting board. She will be framing this herself although she was interested in having me do the mounting. She does such a volume of work that it benefits her to buy wholesale. Not a benefit to me though. She is an amazing artist & often gets me to cut oversized mats & glass for her & calls with questions about conservation issues, etc. Just trying to help her out by utilizing everyone's brilliance around here!
 

Mecianne

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Wally, I thought about the art care restore, since the boards do come in 40 x 60, but I don't have a heat press. Will a tacking iron work for this??
 

Cliff Wilson

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No, tacking iron will not work well with the restore (IMHO). And besides, once you've painted with Pastel you ain't puttin' that thing back in the press! That means reversibility is irrelevant.

At that size I might use Mighty Core, or Gatorboard, for strength. BUT, the Wallis paper is a good weight. Properly hinged and NOT squeezed in with the fitting (ie, don't jam the points in tight, I would guess it would hang ok.

Why not use the fusion and mount to a 8 ply? Or, mount to a 4-ply then use adhesive to coroplast with the flutes vertical?
 

srw19artist56

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I have worked on pastel paper dry mounted to 4 ply rag up to a 18 x 24. For this larger size though, I'd feel more comfortable with an 8 ply rag.

Foam board for me just dents too easily. The artist here, has made an investment in Museum quality Sand Paper. It deserves to be backed by something equal in quality & strength.

Sharon
 

Terry Hart cpf

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You can mount it to whatever you like. No matter what the material you may later regret it. I really don't think there would be any problem with that paper un(permanently)mounted.Hinging as Cliff suggested would be best. Matting would probably be better. Or if the artist is so concerned suggest she work on sanded pastel canvas on a stretcher for something so large. In the end I would do what the customer wants but I try and make sure I wouldn't be blamed for problems forseen or not caused by their bad decision.
PS I mounted a lot of my own acrylic on paper pieces to a variety of boards osing a variety of methods over 20 yr ago. Most have ended up in the trash over the years. As I'm sure you've seen, boards warp , ripple, crack, separate and do all sorts of unpredictable things. A big important commissioned piece on museum quality paper? Why treat it like a cheap poster? Hope you can gently steer them towards something more appropriate.

[ 07-13-2005, 10:59 AM: Message edited by: Terry Hart cpf ]
 

coppertop

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I realize this is a very old thread, but is the exact issue I have today. I would like to work on a large pastel, 27x38, on a heavy sanded paper. paper is archival, and I plan to not use mats, only spacer, if possible.

one post said 'properly hinged'. for this size/weight, what would that be exactly?

and, I'd like to be certain the painting isn't bumping the glass n the middle, either, am I asking for trouble by not moutning/using mats?
 

coppertop

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what is the guideline for moulding width without mats? as in, if the moulding is 2 inches, 3 inches, 4 inches, whatever, is there a size that's too small for no mat framing? or does it depend on size of painting as well? the current thing i'm working on may need re-thunk--its only a 2 inch moulding, and at that size, might be too narrow for matless framing?

so is there a size of frame in addition to width of moulding guidelines?
 

Grey Owl

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what is the guideline for moulding width without mats? as in, if the moulding is 2 inches, 3 inches, 4 inches, whatever, is there a size that's too small for no mat framing? or does it depend on size of painting as well? the current thing i'm working on may need re-thunk--its only a 2 inch moulding, and at that size, might be too narrow for matless framing?

so is there a size of frame in addition to width of moulding guidelines?

I don't think there are any real guidelines, except you want a big enough frame to support the piece. But the size of the frame is not only width but height too. For example some floater frames are narrow but still have the bulk.

As far as I'm concerned, it depends on the art, and the style. I have seen 8 inch wide frames on artwork that is only 3 x 5 inches.
 

preservator

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Sanded pastel paper is a good idea, since the sand can help take the place of the medium that pastel omits and mounting before the work is done is also wise. As Cliff suggested, it makes sense to mount to a substrate that will not warp. If the artist is interseted in longevity, aluminum clad boards such as Dibond or D-lite can be quite useful, since their metal skins will help portect their plastic cores from oxidation. Since these boards may be harder to use with a heat mounting system, a mixture of EVA glue and methyl cellulose can be used, with a clean paint roller.



Hugh
 

Rebecca

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From my experience, I think leaving it unmounted is the best option, simply hinge. If you want even tension consider perimeter hinges. Because if (when) it needs any type of conservation treatment in future, the process is much easier without the backing.
 
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