• Welcome! You will have to REGISTER a free account, before you can access the system. If you already registered, please LOG IN. (top right)
    If you can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it. If you have questions, feel free to click the CONTACT US link at the bottom of this page.
Rian Fabrication Services  www.rianfabrication.com

Vacuum to remove dust in frames

Trish

Grumbler
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
45
Looking to add the vacuum used to get dust out of frames. I have a compressor but not sure how to search for this attachment.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,035
Looking to add the vacuum used to get dust out of frames. I have a compressor but not sure how to search for this attachment.
I've never in 50 years used a vacuum to get dust out of the frame.
We use the compressor with an air nozzle to blast the dust out.
There is a method to doing this and you have to make sure that you have filters on the air line so you aren't blowing any oil out on the glass or the artwork.
 
Last edited:

Trish

Grumbler
Joined
Mar 26, 2017
Messages
45
I've never in 50 years used a vacuum to get dust out of frames.
We use the compressor with an air nozzle to blast the dust out.
There is a method to doing this and you have to make sure that you have filters on the air line so you aren't blowing any oil out on the glass or the artwork.
Ive been doing it will a brush the past 4 years but I know there are more time saving methods. Thanks for the info.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,035

prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,250
I never like to blow or suck near exposed artwork. I try to avoid rapid air movements altogether. In fact
I try not to make rapid movements myself. 😄
I always cover matted artwork when not actually working at it. A soft brush will do the trick to remove
any stray detritus.
 
Register for the picture framer's grumble

Greg Fremstad

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
917
If you tape seal the art-glass-backing while everything is dust free, you'll never have this problem. You will also prevent any new dust, rapid changes in humidity inside the frame, and stop glass cleaner from running down the glass and wetting the mats. Check out the article on the frametek web pages titled "Stop the dust pump". www.frametek.com
 

CHolt

True Grumbler
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
52
Looking to add the vacuum used to get dust out of frames. I have a compressor but not sure how to search for this attachment.
The gadget that can be attached to a compressed air line is called a "Venturi vacuum generator." I use one to laminate veneer onto a profile inside a vacuum bag.

Usually I use the air nozzle to blow the dust away the same way as the others suggested. I'm not sure why you wouldn't want to just use an electric vacuum cleaner to remove dust in the way I think you mean, but I think I'll try the hose from my Venturi next time I fit a shadow box just for the heck of it. If it turns out to be a game changer I will let you know.
 
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 30, 1999
Messages
18,940
We LURVE dust sealing/tape sealing and have done it in the shop for 30 years. I wouldn't do it any other way.
LURVE? Ain't that a museum in France?
I do a variation on sealing, using tabs of 810 tape in strategic spots around the edges. This still prevents the flexing that sucks in debris, but it makes access easy for removing any debris discovered on final inspection before fitting. I do seal all the way around when fitting into old frames or similar situations where shedding materials tend to introduce shmutz into the package.
:cool: Rick
 

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
580
I've never in 50 years used a vacuum to get dust out of the frame.
We use the compressor with an air nozzle to blast the dust out.
There is a method to doing this and you have to make sure that you have filters on the air line so you aren't blowing any oil out on the glass or the artwork.
I'm no rocket surgeon but.... isn't compressed air also high in moisture content?
Wouldn't that be a no-no for archival purists?
Even a remote chance of moisture on the artwork (or trapped in the frame package if sealed quickly after being "compressed-air-dusted".
I know when I open the drain valve all sorts of snot gloops out of that compressor chamber.
Would the air filter you mention also remove that moist air?
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,035
I'm no rocket surgeon but.... isn't compressed air also high in moisture content?
Wouldn't that be a no-no for archival purists?
Even a remote chance of moisture on the artwork (or trapped in the frame package if sealed quickly after being "compressed-air-dusted".
I know when I open the drain valve all sorts of snot gloops out of that compressor chamber.
Would the air filter you mention also remove that moist air?
We have separate oil and water filters on the outlet of the compressors which are SilentAire.
The filters are drained daily and there has never been an issue.
We also drain the compressor tank daily.
I can take the air nozzle and blast a piece of glass from an inch away just to see and there is no sign of any moisture.

I have been framing for 50 years now (still full time) and I work as shop manager for a man who is on the National PPFA Competition Committee and he also tests the CPF and MCPF candidates at the WCAF in Las Vegas each year.

What we do works for us.
We are very high volume, retail and commercial.
We work on pieces worth 10 dollars and also tens of thousands of dollars with 100% 5-star reviews on Google, Yelp and Facebook.
 
Last edited:

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
580
We have separate oil and water filters on the outlet of the compressors which are SilentAire.
The filters are drained daily and there has never been an issue.
I can take the air nozzle and blast a piece of glass from an inch away just to see and there is no sign of any moisture.

I have been framing for 50 years now (still full time) and I work as shop manager for a man who is on the National PPFA Competition Committee and he also tests the CPF and MCPF candidates at the WCAF in Las Vegas each year.

What we do works for us.
We are very high volume, retail and commercial.
We work on pieces worth 10 dollars and also tens of thousands of dollars with 100% 5-star reviews on Google, Yelp and Facebook.
Please don't misunderstand, I wasn't questioning your experience at all.
It was a question from my inexperience looking for information from those of you who know much more than I do.
I had no idea there were oil and water filters for compressors.
I will look into that.
I only use a small one for the chop saw and joiner.
I don't use one in the finishing shop. Primarily because where I work is small, with very low volume of work per day. You probably do more work in month than I do in a year.
I don't imagine I'd need the filters for what I currently use the compressor for. But...if I do decide to try it in the finishing shop, now I know the right way to do it.
Thanks for the tip 👍
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,035
Please don't misunderstand, I wasn't questioning your experience at all.
It was a question from my inexperience looking for information from those of you who know much more than I do.
I had no idea there were oil and water filters for compressors.
I will look into that.
I only use a small one for the chop saw and joiner.
I don't use one in the finishing shop. Primarily because where I work is small, with very low volume of work per day. You probably do more work in month than I do in a year.
I don't imagine I'd need the filters for what I currently use the compressor for. But...if I do decide to try it in the finishing shop, now I know the right way to do it.
Thanks for the tip 👍
No problem.
There are many different opinions on the Grumble and I sometimes find that if one person says the Sun rises in the East and sets in the West there will be people who will argue.

Also, there are some compressor driven pieces like v-nailers and some saws that need oil fed into the airline going into the machine for lubrication of the 0-rings while other equipment requires the use of clean, filtered air.

Sorry if I was a little "edgy" but we are slammed at work and It's been a long week.:shutup:
Have a good one.:thumbsup:
 
Last edited:
Register for the picture framer's grumble

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
580
No problem.
There are many different opinions on the Grumble and I sometimes find that if one person says the Sun rises in the East and sets in the West there will be people who will argue.

Also, there are some compressor driven pieces like v-nailers and some saws that need oil fed into the airline going into the machine for lubrication of the 0-rings while other equipment requires the use of clean, filtered air.

Sorry if I was a little "edgy" but we are slammed at work and It's been a long week.:shutup:
Have a good one.:thumbsup:
It's all good :beer:
This is a demanding time of year for us all, isn't it.
I'm putting in extra time this weekend to be sure all the Christmas orders are ready by the 23rd.
I bet most of us are.

I'll chew your ear off next time I need help about equipment.
Have a great holiday.
 
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.
Top