Using flawed glass

framinzfun

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 28, 2002
Posts
893
From
eastern pa
I was framing a piece today, and almost had it done... when I saw it. :eek: That weird little bubble in the glass that hides there until I'm almost finished and always seems to be in the most obvious place on the piece, like the light colored mat... Ugh. And it is a nice fresh piece of UV glass to boot. I was looking at it and it is really very small and only visible from certain angles (that's me talking myself into assuming no other person in the world would see this but me)... anyway, does anyone let any of these little bubbles go, or once you see it, do you trash the glass and start over? Obviously the big raging bubbles are no good, but can you ever leave one of those tiny bubbles (no Don Ho jokes, please) there?
 

DTWDSM

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 19, 2002
Posts
2,824
From
USA
We have been seeing flaws like that in the glass more often ever since TV started lowering the Iron content in their glass. It also seems to streak more, we have not changed glass cleaner but in the last couple months it seems to leave streaks.
 

elsa

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Apr 1, 2005
Posts
378
From
Maple Valley, Wa
It really depends--I have certainly left a few, but many I have changed the glass out--Usually I will circle the spot with a marking pen--sooner or later I will use that piece for something.

Elsa
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 6, 2001
Posts
16,932
From
Wisconsin
it helps if you shrink-wrap the piece - rather loosely - after it's finished. And turn the lights down in your retail area. Maybe consider delivering the order to the customer's home, where the lighting is almost always subdued.

We have the trained, experienced eyes but I've have customers that can detect flaws that would elude an electron microscope. If you can see it, they probably will.
 

Janet L

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 9, 2001
Posts
2,458
From
Clayton, NC, USA
Wouldn't consider sending out a piece of flawed glass. I don't enjoy 're-do' work. If your customer finds the flaw, then the next time you frame for them, they're gonna really check out the finished piece to make sure you didn't miss something again.

Use the flawed glass on your own framing, or a shop display that's gonna hang way up high out of the customer's reach.
 

JbNormandog

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Posts
3,751
From
NJ
I don't send out anything that I don't think is worthy of my own walls at home.

IF it bothers you it might bother them and when they bring it back you have to "act" like it was your first time seeing it. This would call into discusion why a civilian can see it and you a profesional did not.

Swap it and curse under your breath at the glass gods like I do.
 

Dave

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Posts
13,355
From
Edwardsburg, MI
I agree with Janet and Jb. All the resources we put into marketing and advertising, signage, displays, etc. is wasted if we don't turn out the absolute best product possible. Quality work is our best advertising and it will tell tales for many years to come about the type of work you do.

Would the BB's re-do a piece with a small flaw?
shrug.gif


I don't know about everyone else, but if I let something slip by thinking it won't be noticed, it comes back to bite me in the behind or I wake up at 3 AM thinking about it and scolding myself for not correcting it. It is much easier to fix things when you catch them...you'll sleep better too!

Dave Makielski
 

Jack Cee

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Posts
666
From
Willows, CA
Save that flawed glass for use on antique prints. The old glass (Before modern glass) has flaws, bubbles, off color and uneven surfaces that are typical of the time period and should be priced at a premium for the right customer. I wouldn't try to sell a flawed piece to a customer that expects perfection in new work.

If a customer brings in an antique framed print and wants the glass replaced, do it but keep the old glass for resale. I broke a piece of antique glass once and replaced it with another old one that matched.

Jack Cee
 
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