Tricks for Cutting Backing Paper

Jason

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Dec 3, 2004
Posts
198
Location
Iowa
I have to admit the thing I hate the most about finishing up a job is trimming the paper on the back. Are there any steps for making this an easier process. It seems that all the little "devices" out there do not make a perfect straight line from the edge of the frame to the paper. What is the best gadget to use? I use Nona's method of laying down double sided tape on each side and then peeling it as you strech the paper. This part works fine. It is just the trimming part that gives me fits. Maybe after doing it over and over again, one could use thier finger on the side of the frame and guide the blade and get an even cut. Is this the best way? Are there gadgets out there that I do not know about? Any help appreciated! Thanks.
 
I use the "Hassle Free" trimmer, #2001 in the UMS catalog. It recycles used mat blades and will cut a line as straight as the edge of the frame it is using as a guide. Of course you could always lay down a straight edge and try to hold it in place while sliding an Exacto knife or a used mat blade down its edge. You couldn't buy that Hassle Free trimmer from me for any price!!

(Well, ................ let's talk about it.)

Why the concern about a perfectly straight cut on the dust cover?? If that is the only thing that is lacking in your framing I would say that you are doing an A-1 professional job!!!
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:cool:

Framerguy
 
Everyone wants an easy-to-use dustcover trimming tool. We have at least four different kinds, and each fitter has his/her favorite.

My favorite tool for the purpose is a fresh & clean, single-edge razor blade. Hold it at a compound angle and pull it slowly & gently along the frame's edge.
 
So, Jim, you are actually trimming the paper and leaving it butted up against the edge of the frame when you are finished? This is instead of the 1/8" of wood that shows when using a "gadget" --- right? Thanks.
 
I use the trimmers from United retrofitted to take wizard blades.
 
Originally posted by Jason:
So, Jim, you are actually trimming the paper and leaving it butted up against the edge of the frame when you are finished? This is instead of the 1/8" of wood that shows when using a "gadget" --- right? Thanks.
Yes Jason, the paper's edge goes all the way to the wood's edge, but no overhang is acceptable.

Those in my shop who use the recessed-paper-edge tools run a stain marker around the unfinished wood on the frame's back first. Looks better.
 
You people make me feel hopeful about my inventing the table spoon for the lef-handed peops.
What's wrong with simply sanding off the excess paper with a 220 sending block passed a few times against frame's edge? That will do wonders. Do you really need a hassle free trimmer with two blades for left and right hand?
 
Jim - I like both of your ideas. What color of stain marker? One that matches the backing paper, or matches the frame?

Whynot - Interesting. May give your idea a try. Do you have a photo you can post of what the finished result looks like when doing it this way?
 
Cornell that was going to be my suggestion as well, if you want that to the edge look! Just a good solid block of wood with 220 sandpaper wrapped around it.

My daugther is a lefty, do you have any prototypes of that spoon available? Maybe she could product test it for you Cornell.
 
Richard and Jim,
That's the method I was weaned on and was very good at it. Arthritis sometimes makes it a little hard on my thumb joint so I moved to the trimmer and haven't looked back. I tried different trimmers while working for other framers and didn't like any of them until I found the red trimmer.

Cornel,
You don't have to put blades on both sides; I just use a blade for the right hand (Left hand cutting for me just doesn't work).
I have tried the sandpaper approach but didn't like dealing with the very fine mess left behind, perhaps I was doing it wrong
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Originally posted by Jason:
Jim - I like both of your ideas. What color of stain marker? One that matches the backing paper, or matches the frame?
All of our dustcover paper is Lineco Blue, so we use a stain marker that somewhat matches the frame. It doesn't havce to be perfect, since only 1/8" will show.

When we used black Kraft paper, we used a black marker. I guess if one uses brown Kraft paper, the color of the unfinished wood on back is close enough.

Trimming the dustcover with sandpaper is just as neat as using a razor blade -- maybe neater, because it tapers & rounds off the edges. However, it makes sawdust on the fitting table, which is the LAST place in my shop where I want to have to deal with sawdust.
 
Whynot: was thiking the same thing. Have always used tht approach and is clean, neat, no blades involved and really really easy
 
Understanding the dust issue, how do you use this sandpaper method? By hand trin as close to the frame as you can and the run the sandpaper block around the edges, or do you even have to trim the paper before sanding?
 
No, Jason, you don't need to trim the paper first. That method would imply you've got hassle free trimming scissors from United and those are in scarce supply since the advent of Hassle free trimmer #2001. You need to practice the sending methode and see for yourself how clean and neat it can be. If you do the sanding at the margin of your fitting table you get no dust on that table at all (but on the floor, if any)
 
Personally, I'm not a dust advocate either....whether it's on the table or on the floor, it travels. No fun!!

Re: sanding - what keeps you from sanding the moulding itself? Sounds tricky.

I prefer Jim Miller's method for paper dust covers. It's fast, neat & spiffy! When I cut Tyvek however, I use a gadget that cuts in 1/8" because it sometimes frays. This method allows me to clean it up much easier.
 
I "tweeked" my red trimmer today because it kept sliding off the edges of slightly rounded frame backs. This annoyed me greatly.

So I took it apart and shimmed the blades out with one strip of 4-ply matboard with holes punched for the screws.

PERFECT!!!
 
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