To Cut or Not to Cut (Mold)

Small Town Idaho

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I have a signed, limited edition print a customer found in an old barn that they want to salvage.

Most is in remarkably good condition, but one corner has been attacked by mold. I searched the G and found Rebecca’s advice to use grated art gum reside to remove any loose spores (and did so).

The question is if I should stop there (since the piece will be hung in a very dry, non-humid environment moving forward) or, since the mold only affects the white border, trim the affected section away.

I obviously don’t want to diminish any possible value, but since the mold may have already done so, is it crazy to consider trimming?

Appreciate any thoughts/advice.
 

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Good point on the mold possibly extending further Ylva, thank you for that!

The customer is the “do your best without breaking the bank” type so actual conservation is not in the cards.
 
In that case, I think you have already done the best you can as a framer to eliminate the obvious spores. Whatever else might be in there is not your responsibility to remove (because you are not a conservator, and are not being paid as such). I would just frame it the best way you can and explain to the customer that because of its previous circumstances, it is impossible to guarantee the problem won't recur. If the customer understands that, all is well. You could advise them that displaying it in a non-humid environment will be their best bet to preserve it.
:cool: Rick
 
The customer is the “do your best without breaking the bank” type so actual conservation is not in the cards.
We hear that a lot.

Even professional conservation treatment might fully restore the art to its original condition. But without that, the damage will surely continue, further diminishing the value of the art in the future.
 
Mold spores are all around us, so you're not going to eliminate them anyway.
If you are curious about the presence of mold spores, check the print using a black light.
Gently physically clean it as well as you can.

On the other side is the value, and, yes, the mold growth will have affected that. But value is based on 1. Condition, 2. Scarcity, and 3. Demand (not necessarily in that order). If it is of value regardless of condition, treatment can always be done later on. Trimming now is irreparable.
 
In that case, I think you have already done the best you can as a framer to eliminate the obvious spores. Whatever else might be in there is not your responsibility to remove (because you are not a conservator, and are not being paid as such). I would just frame it the best way you can and explain to the customer that because of its previous circumstances, it is impossible to guarantee the problem won't recur. If the customer understands that, all is well. You could advise them that displaying it in a non-humid environment will be their best bet to preserve it.
:cool: Rick
Thanks for the advice, Rick ... you reminded me that I am most definitely NOT a conservator and therefore shouldn't find solutions to problems that are conservation in nature. (Sometimes I forget I'm not supposed to know everything about everything...) ;-)
 
We hear that a lot.

Even professional conservation treatment might fully restore the art to its original condition. But without that, the damage will surely continue, further diminishing the value of the art in the future.
Good point, Jim ... no point in trying to do more than I actually know how to do ... appreciate the input.
 
Mold spores are all around us, so you're not going to eliminate them anyway.
If you are curious about the presence of mold spores, check the print using a black light.
Gently physically clean it as well as you can.

On the other side is the value, and, yes, the mold growth will have affected that. But value is based on 1. Condition, 2. Scarcity, and 3. Demand (not necessarily in that order). If it is of value regardless of condition, treatment can always be done later on. Trimming now is irreparable.
Really appreciate you pointing out that true conservation efforts could be taken up in the future, if the conditions regarding value, scarcity and demand come to bear. I hadn't thought of it that way, so thank you!
 
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