Tiny Floated Art

Shayla

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Customer has two small frames with art sandwiched between glass. Size of art is approx. 5 x 8". One piece of glass broke and customer wants the piece re-attached to a new piece. He doesn't want to scan, or use acrylic, or magnets, etc... He just wants it back together. Knowing it likely wouldn't work, I tried attaching with a dab of rice starch in each corner. As soon as the starch dried, the piece came right off. They were stuck down with something before, which might have just been glue. If I were to re-attach it with a small dot of something on the back of each corner, is white pva glue or acrylic gel better?

Here are both of them. The frame for Mr. Float is downstairs being clamped.

framing two persian floats 1 cropped  thiel (2).jpg

Here is the back of Mrs. Float's frame. He wants this left as is.
framing back of one persian cropped float.jpg

And now, I'm realizing that we likely don't have any nails this tiny. It would be nice if I still had the ones from his frame. Please God, have let me save them.
(I'm not sure if retroactive prayer works, but it's worth trying.)
 

alacrity8

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Could you use your smallest nails, insert, and then cut off the head to the desired length.

If you can find where they were originally glued, can you try adding glue to those spots, thus not damaging it any further than has already been done.

I'm not sure which glue would be best.

I have worked with very similar works before, but we matted it on both sides, with hinges.
I really hate this double glass as the mat concept.
 

Shayla

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Could you use your smallest nails, insert, and then cut off the head to the desired length.

If you can find where they were originally glued, can you try adding glue to those spots, thus not damaging it any further than has already been done.

I'm not sure which glue would be best.

I have worked with very similar works before, but we matted it on both sides, with hinges.
I really hate this double glass as the mat concept.
Thanks for the idea about the nails, and maybe it'll work. I agree about not liking this double glass float idea, and I usually steer folks to display methods that better protect the art.
After the rice starch didn't stick to the glass, I put some dots of acrylic gel on the inside of the back piece and left it to dry. Before work, I'll try pinning the two pieces of glass together, and hope that the pressure of the dried gel will hold the paper in place. A Grumble friend once suggested it on a similar project, and it'll be interesting to see if it works.
 

wpfay

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I really hate this double glass as the mat concept.
But flocked wallpaper looks so good around ancient Persian manuscripts.

You might try using a small brush with water to activate the starch paste on hinging tape, and use small dots of that.
I don't know if it would be worth taking the second one apart to see how the paper is held in place, but it is an option.
And what Robo said...
 

alacrity8

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Wheat starch sticks to glass and if you have the black fletcher gun, the glaziers points may be short enough.

This one for me, would come under don’t wanna do it but if I must you gonna pay.
This frame seems thin enough that any nail gun might fire a nail though the wood.
Hand inserted nails seem the safest way to go.
 

Nikodeumus

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It's not much help now, but..
Anytime I get someone looking to update their artwork from these older frames, I remove and keep the brads/glazier points etc. in a small jar.
Then when a situation like this comes up, I have a stash of these parts to re-use.
I'd prefer to use better modern methods, but some customers don't like that the piece isn't in its "original condition" (even if that could be detrimental to the future condition of the art :shrug:).
 

auntiesarahjayne

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do you have to use glass on the back, or can it be acrylic? I'd had luck scuffing up a spot where PVA can adhere to both plexi and artwork. Good luck with the job.
 

Photowonder

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AFA the adhesive, I would shy away from liquids completely. Decades of collage art creation taught me this.

I recommend this, believe it or not. There used to be a couple of companies which manufactured craft versions, but this is the same exact thing:

 

Nikodeumus

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What about Museum Wax?
I have some I got for my own use at home for crafting.
I wonder if it would work for this?
At this point, we're just speculating. I don't think there is any single "proven" solution.

Amazon product

As in many other cases we have all had, the method of display requested by the customer is sort of antithetical to the goals of preservation framing.
But if the customer didn't request preservation, does that mean achieving the aesthetic goal comes before protecting the art piece?
 

Lafontsee

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Quakehold and other non-framing specific materials would not be a good idea. The Quakehold would likely absorb into the paper and leave a dark spot wherever it is used. I wouldn't mess with the adhesive made for hairpieces either. Who knows what its chemistry is or how long it will hold?

One solution I thought of was to adhere a couple small pieces of paper to the glass with a more permanent glue like PVA then adhere the artwork to that with your starch paste. This doesn't solve the issue of it being constrained in case of expansion/contraction, but it will be removeable should it need to be reframed in the future.

James
 
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