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Tightly Rolled Prints

Stephen Enggass

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 12, 2019
Messages
176
I just got in some rolled museum prints on thick stock. large. 24x30+ How do I work with them being that they are holding there roll so tightly? My intention is to dry mount them. I think. Thoughts?
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Messages
2,686
The thicker the paper and the tighter the roll the longer it will take to get them flat.

As a first attempt I would place a long, heavy weight long one edge then carefully unroll with both hands against that until I could place another weight on the other end and leave them overnight to see what happens. You may have to do this for a couple of nights to get results. Once they are a bit "disciplined" you can place them under a lite of glass for a couple of nights. If you try the "classic" method of holding one end and unrolling with the other hand there is a good chance you will get a crease. For the same reason rolling them the other way is also dangerous.

If they are at all valuable it will be worthwhile as any form of mounting will devalue them.
 

Framar

WOW Framer
Joined
Jul 24, 2001
Messages
25,348
If you plan on drymounting the items anyway, if you are vewwy vewwy careful, you can flatten them by unrolling them into a heat press between release boards and using low heat, tame them that way. If they are very bad, I leave them in the locked press and turn off the heat. Of course this would not work for a vacuum press.
 

Stephen Enggass

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Aug 12, 2019
Messages
176
It just occurred to me, these pieces I have are promotional posters for art exhibits. Would it not be appropriate to simply dry mount then frame without mat? The each have wide 3-4” borders around the content of each poster. Thoughts? First time doing pieces like these. I’m a newbie. Thanks.
 
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Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
400
There is a product called a de-roller that works remarkably well for flattening tightly rolled paper.
I imagine you could kludge something together with a small diameter cardboard tube and some kraft paper that would operate nearly as well.

James
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,811
I roll them around a larger tube and then let them sit in a large tube to relax.

I have also successfully rolled them in the opposite direction around a large-ish tube till they could be laid out in my heat press. Once they are flat-ish, lay them onto a release board and then slide another board on top. In the press with heat and pressure for 3 or 4 minutes and then weighted until cool.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,811
Call your customer and ASK if they are valuable or not. If not, then just dry mount and be done.
Not everything needs to be handled to museum specs.
 

Joe B

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
5,117
Reverse roll them on a 3 - 4 inch diameter tube. I tape a long piece of kraft paper on the tube first then wrap it a couple of times and then reverse roll the print using the kraft paper to keep it tight and straight. Leave it sit for 1/2 to an hour then unroll them and drymount them if that is what you are going to do.

Another way is to lightly mist the rear of the print and place them in your cold heat press face up. Set the temperature to 160 degrees and run it for about 10 minutes from cold to 160 degrees. The steam from the distilled water will relax the fibers of the paper - LIGHTLY MIST - do not soak the paper. What you have done is made a quick humidifier. Don't do this to real valuable art though I have with my own pieces without ever having a problem.
 
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artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Messages
2,686
Are you referring to dry mounting (...avoid)?
For any artwork with any sort of intrinsic value mounting it to a substrate by any means will devalue it in the eyes of a collector or connoisseur.


As others have said - if these are just posters with no monetary value beyond their cost then stick 'em down with a clear conscience. However, if the paper is stiff and stubborn mounting can be difficult and a bit of work to relax the paper will make the job a lot easier.
 

Pat Murphey

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Nov 16, 2002
Messages
13,621
I saved the 6" tubes that Lineco's backing paper came in. I taped a length of Kraft paper to the tube.

Just slide one end of the offending print and use the Kraft paper to carefully roll the print against the tube. Tape it closed and give it time to relax. I always made it a condition with my customer that I wouldn't frame nor mount the piece until it was manageable - recommending patience for a couple of weeks.
 

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,399
A note: Digital inks are sensitive to temperature, and higher temps can cause fading. MountCor's 130 avoids this, and depending on who you ask, KoolTack's 150 might, too. Anything above that, and you're getting into fade territory.
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,181
I saved the 6" tubes that Lineco's backing paper came in. I taped a length of Kraft paper to the tube.

Just slide one end of the offending print and use the Kraft paper to carefully roll the print against the tube. Tape it closed and give it time to relax. I always made it a condition with my customer that I wouldn't frame nor mount the piece until it was manageable - recommending patience for a couple of weeks.
I do the exact same thing, including the “patience” clause. Lol
 
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framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,811
Shayla, in all the time i have been printing and dry mounting digital prints out of Epson and Canon large format printers, i have never come across nor heard of increased temps causing fading.

Where did you hear this?
The temps that you mention.. 130 and 150... are so low as to not cause anything to happen. I mount at 180 with no perceivable fading or anything else.

There are some digital printing processes that are printed using heat to activate the ink to expel out of the nozzles and those ARE heat sensitive as it will make the inks on the paper go all wonky...pretty much destroying the image.

Any links to that info would be appreciated.
 
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