Opinions Wanted Thoughts on purchasing a used Jyden foot chopper?

J

joline

Guest
Hi. I've recently received an email about a used Jyden foot chopper for sale ($400 obo). Haven't seen it yet, but the person says it is in good condition. He actually invited me up to his shop to see how it works and try it out, which is so cool. I've been looking for alternatives to the messy saw dusty miter saw, something I can actually use to cut moulding inside and thought this might be worth checking out. I've done some searching on the forum and it seems like most people upgrade from these, not go to them after using electric....Haven't seen much about pros/cons to using the foot chopper vs. electric. My framing expertise is growing (haven't been at it too long) and any advice you have is appreciated. Thanks!!

PS - I only make custom frames for my talented photographer friend, so it's not a huge volume per month that I make.
 

Paul Cascio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Oct 5, 2006
Messages
4,679
Jyden is a fine machine, and as with most choppers, there are few parts that might ever go bad. If the chopper looks good, it probably is good. However, the one item that wears out are the blades. Chances are they blades still have at least some life in them, and also that they could benefit from sharpening ($25-$35 in most locales). However, should they be worn out from repeated sharpenings, even a new set of blades only costs about $350, giving you the near equivalent of an almost new machine.
 

Baer Charlton

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
21,029
Location
On FB
Just take a truck, and hand them the money...... As Paul says.... if it's all there,
and works.... even if the blades are toast.... at $400..... you can buy new
blades and still be ahead of the $1,000-1,500 they go for almost any where
on any coast and in between.
 

Rick Granick

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jun 30, 1999
Messages
19,518
Location
Cincinnati, OH
My Jyden was used when I bought it almost 36 years ago, and it is still as good as new. Keep the blades sharp and keep it clean, and it'll last forever (or at least as long as you do).
:cool: Rick
 

Joe B

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
5,963
Location
Blaine, Minnesota
A Jyden chopper is as good as it gets until something breaks down. Parts are just about impossible to get, I'm speaking through experience. I got rid of my Jyden and got a Morso for exactly that reason. The pivot for moving the head forwards and backwards got worn and therefore the head had some forward/backward play not allowing good mitres. I looked high and low for parts but couldn't find them. Most Morso parts do not fit the Jyden & I can get Morso parts with no problems. Luckily a chopper doesn't break down often so you may get years of service without problems. The price is excellent if it is good condition.
 

cwphoto

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 5, 2012
Messages
162
Location
Alaska
Hi. I've recently received an email about a used Jyden foot chopper for sale ($400 obo). Haven't seen it yet, but the person says it is in good condition. He actually invited me up to his shop to see how it works and try it out, which is so cool. I've been looking for alternatives to the messy saw dusty miter saw, something I can actually use to cut moulding inside and thought this might be worth checking out. I've done some searching on the forum and it seems like most people upgrade from these, not go to them after using electric....Haven't seen much about pros/cons to using the foot chopper vs. electric. My framing expertise is growing (haven't been at it too long) and any advice you have is appreciated. Thanks!!

PS - I only make custom frames for my talented photographer friend, so it's not a huge volume per month that I make.

Having gone from a foot chopper to a miter saw, Have you considered improving your dust collection system? Mitre saws are quite a bit faster than a foot chopper, and cut things like gesso coated molding much better with less chipping. My $900 chopper is collecting dust--I hate the thing, and my back hates the machine even more. Once you start getting into three-inch wide moldings, you need to lift your foot like 20 inches off the ground. That is quite literally a big stretch for your back, and if you're not in decent shape, it's quite a workout. I know it bothers some people's knee's as well. Most modern molding is made out of Luan, so it's not like it's extremely hard wood, and you can of course take smaller bites, but compared to a miter saw, it's a lot more work.

I actually think the results are better with my miter saw, and will never go back, but yes, there's plenty of people who like their choppers!

$400 is certainly a good price.

Troy
 
Top