The Perfect Screwdriver?

Matthew Hale

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My recent buying experience from Garret Wade hasn’t been so good. When I first discovered them in the 80s they handled only top of the line woodworking tools. Now, and in particular, their branded tools, just don’t have the quality GW was once known for.
Kind of depressing, like looking for restoration hardware at the rebranded RH.
yeah, i've had some real winners from them, but also some "meh". my fave EDC pocketknife is a garret wade find.
1659016142762.png
 

Zahid

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Only two comments
1. Buy the cheapest screwdrivers that feel the most comfortable in your hands, then do #2
2. If you have access to a grinder learn how to "sharpen" a screw driver. If you don't want to bother with it and want something ready to go off the shelf look for "slotted screwdriver"

I have no desire to pass along a set of screw drivers to my next generation, I treat them as shop tools that will have to be replaced after several years of wear and tear. I personally like ones with thicker handles with some sort of rubberized grip. I even buy them from Harborfreight and then sharpen them. I am a hobbyist woodworker so I have a few sharpening things in my garage shop.
 

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Marples makes beautiful hand tools. I have a set of their butt chisels.
These would be a nice addition to the tool box. These are legacy tools and should last several generations.
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On my wish list.
 

David Waldmann

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Only two comments
1. Buy the cheapest screwdrivers that feel the most comfortable in your hands, then do #2
2. If you have access to a grinder learn how to "sharpen" a screw driver. If you don't want to bother with it and want something ready to go off the shelf look for "slotted screwdriver"

I have no desire to pass along a set of screw drivers to my next generation, I treat them as shop tools that will have to be replaced after several years of wear and tear. I personally like ones with thicker handles with some sort of rubberized grip. I even buy them from Harborfreight and then sharpen them. I am a hobbyist woodworker so I have a few sharpening things in my garage shop.
The only thing worse than slotted screws* are, well, I can't think of anything right now. Maybe in a millennium or so I'll come up with something.

*unless you are reproducing or repairing an historic piece where they were used.
 

Rick Granick

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Well, if this treasured Kobalt screwdriver ever breaks, I'll have to look for metal hardware that uses combo screws. Even if so, the hangers still use slotted screws, and this Kobalt is exactly the right size so it works in both the corner hardware and the hangers, without having to switch to a smaller one.
:cool: Rick
 

wpfay

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The only thing worse than slotted screws* are, well, I can't think of anything right now. Maybe in a millennium or so I'll come up with something.

*unless you are reproducing or repairing an historic piece where they were used.
I think the answer is "No screws at all".
 

Tom1234

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Well, if this treasured Kobalt screwdriver ever breaks, I'll have to look for metal hardware that uses combo screws. Even if so, the hangers still use slotted screws, and this Kobalt is exactly the right size so it works in both the corner hardware and the hangers, without having to switch to a smaller one.
:cool: Rick 9DF0A213-DE4B-4C53-BCC3-D70AEA2B36C4.jpeg
Looked on line and found a similar screwdriver at Harbor Freight.
 

Rick Granick

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That might work, as long as the tip is the right size, and the metal is as durable. I'll try one next time I go there.
:cool: Rick
 

Larry Peterson

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I have to admit I seldom actually use a real screwdriver. 95% of my interactions with screws are with my Milwaukee 12v keyless chuck driver.


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I have hex screwdriver bits I can change out bits with the greatest of ease in this puppy.

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HPR-0260.jpg



I have a complete assortment of Craftsman screwdrivers which are seldom used. I have one of the sets that has 637 screwdrivers (or thereabouts) that sold for $9.95 (you know the ones I am talking about) and another set of the Craftsman Professional screwdrivers which don't seem to be sold anymore.

Instead I have 3 of the 12v Milwaukee drivers as shown above. One has a #2 square drive bit (the most used), one has a #0 square driver bit for pre-dilling narrow frames and the last has a 5/64" bit for pre-drilling screw holes. And of course an assortment of other hex screwdriver bits for all those other occasions.

I was in HomeDepot this morning and was perusing the screwdriver sets. This Dewalt set looked interesting if I actually was looking for some screwdrivers.

f9b666e4-4e52-433e-9026-7d3472a15395


As did this Milwaukee set.

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Mike Labbe

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We use that same electric one. We have a couple of those, and love them!
 

Rick Granick

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At home I have the drill and impact driver set from that series. They are nice. With metal frames, though, I like the control of a manual screwdriver.
:cool: Rick
 

Larry Peterson

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My Milwaukee's are a replacement for the 3 PowerSmith's in the image below. Those served me well for years but I replaced them with the Milwaukee's as I found them on sale. As an added bonus, my Craftsman Professional screwdrivers are also shown below.

shop25.jpg
 

Larry Peterson

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wpfay

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Nikodeumus

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This is my family's favourite "multi-tool", a stainless steel made in Japan oyster shucker.
It's certainly older than I am. I'm pretty sure it originally belonged to one of my grandparents.
20221106_161231.jpg
It currently lives in my drawer of "things that do other things".
I use it frequently for non-oyster related tasks.
I will bequeath it to one of my nieces or nephews in my will.:p
 

wpfay

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This is my family's favourite "multi-tool", a stainless steel made in Japan oyster shucker.
It's certainly older than I am. I'm pretty sure it originally belonged to one of my grandparents.
View attachment 43888
It currently lives in my drawer of "things that do other things".
I use it frequently for non-oyster related tasks.
I will bequeath it to one of my nieces or nephews in my will.:p
I have that same oyster knife from some former family member. It's been in the family longer than I have.
I have never repurposed it but have modified any number of defunct screwdrivers and table knives into oyster knives.
 

Rick Granick

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I have that same oyster knife from some former family member. It's been in the family longer than I have.
I have never repurposed it but have modified any number of defunct screwdrivers and table knives into oyster knives.
I'm not an oyster fan, but I have repurposed broken screwdrivers into pry tools and other useful handled gadgets too.
And, yes, I have a couple of antique silverplated round-end table knives that come in handy for tasks such as separating old mats from one another in reframings.
:cool: Rick
 

David Waldmann

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TORX........
My personal, biased, non-scientific, possibly jaded and certainly non-referential opinion is that, from a purely functional standpoint, TORX is the best flathead screw fastener. Gets a bit cumbersome in larger sizes where 6 point hex heads make more sense. You know, like the bolts that hold the Golden Gate Bridge together. Or even the wheels on my pickup truck.
 

monkey

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My personal, biased, non-scientific, possibly jaded and certainly non-referential opinion is that, from a purely functional standpoint, TORX is the best flathead screw fastener. Gets a bit cumbersome in larger sizes where 6 point hex heads make more sense. You know, like the bolts that hold the Golden Gate Bridge together. Or even the wheels on my pickup truck.
I agree TORX is my favorite, I like the T25 bit. I remodeled my whole kitchen using GRK and Grip-Rite construction screws.
 
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