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Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

Tape identification

nzsky

Grumbler in Training
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
7
I purchased a roll of ASAP7 hinging tape which looks quite different from all the pictures I've seen of ASAP7 and want to check it is the correct tape. I emailed asap art framing and was asked to telephone them. When I said I was not in the US that was the last I heard from them. The email:
"I purchased ASAP7 tape from a major stockist and received a roll in a zip lock bag with a small ASAP label. The tape does not have asap branding on the cardboard roll inner, it's cream colored, has a torn tape end (ie not the zigzag end like in your photo's). The font on the label differs from online photo's of the same size ASAP7 labels, and is grey-scale (ie the 'A' is not red like your typical branding). It has 2/20 hand written in red marker on the label."
Can anyone confirm ASAP7 can come as described above, ie no branding, cream coloured etc? Attached are pictures from online advertising of what I was expecting, and the last pic is what I received. Thanks for any advice.
 

Attachments

nzsky

Grumbler in Training
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
7
I honestly had never heard of this tape. Self adhesive paper tape? I assume that it is not gummed as in water activated?
ASAP7 - " 25mm x 55m. White self-adhesive ph neutral (acid free) paper tape. Repositionable, clean removal adhesive system that does not leave residue. Ideal for hinging prints to mounts, dust proof sealing and other Conservation/Archival applications. "
So not gummed, self adhesive. Claims to be archival, a property I definitely want considering how much I've spent on rag mat etc.
I actually ordered Neschen Filmoplast P 90 but that was out of stock and was offered the asap7 as an alternative. I will probably end up using linco gummed tape but still want to know what I was sold.
 
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David Hewitt

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Feb 26, 2009
Messages
402
It looks like a generic, example, we prefer the J-LAR brand of clear tape, and many times when ordered, received a generic no name brand. If the inside core does not have the brand name or is blank it most likely is generic. In the case of the J-LAR vs generic there was no comparison.
 

wvframer

Humble Picture Framer
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1,837
Neither of these tapes meets preservation standards. Pressure-sensitive tapes always fail. It is only a matter of time.

These tapes have a number of worthwhile uses, but mounting is not on my list.

I would be looking at torn paper strips, a platform mount, or hinging if preservation is important.
 
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nzsky

Grumbler in Training
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
7
It looks like a generic, example, we prefer the J-LAR brand of clear tape, and many times when ordered, received a generic no name brand. If the inside core does not have the brand name or is blank it most likely is generic. In the case of the J-LAR vs generic there was no comparison.
Suspected that, so the question remains - why was I sent a generic no brand tape, which is probably not acid free let alone archival, in a bag marked asap7. It's a rhetoric question really, someone put it there, which is fraud, or at best a stupid mistake that could cost a framer bigly.
Now that I'm feeling paranoid, can someone confirm that Crescent Museum mounting board comes with no identifying label like standard crescent ragmat does. It makes me wonder how anyone new to the game can be sure they are using the correct / genuine products.
 
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Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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It is why I order through suppliers I trust.

The combination rag mats and pressure sensitive tape makes no sense. I use some similar tape in my store, but never for hinging.
 

nzsky

Grumbler in Training
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
7
We have very little choice in supplier here in New Zealand and I'm new to this so have yet to learn who is best. I'm using museum mount board with rag mat because they are the same price here so I might as well go for the better option. Regarding the tape I read this here "there are some that pass the PAT (Photo Activity Test). Neschen's Filmoplast P 90 is one of them" but in my hurry read it totally out of context - the next line would have convinced me not to use pressure sensitive tape, so thank you for putting me straight.
 

Framar

WOW Framer
Joined
Jul 24, 2001
Messages
25,349
Part of the problem with framing is the terminology differs across the globe and even within countries.

To hinge can refer to either attaching a mat to the substrate - or - to attach the artwork to the substrate. For the former, self-adhesive tape is generally OK, but for the latter it is a HUGE NO NO. In a nutshell, the basic idea behind conservation/archival/museum framing is that every single process can be reversed without doing any harm to the art.

The framer I worked for in the seventies called "fitting" mounting and yet he also had a charge for mounting (dry mounting) which confused customers all the time. "Why am I being charged for mounting? You already charged me for mounting." And until I convinced them to use the correct term, it felt really idiotic to have to tell the customer that it was a charge for "mounting it into the frame." LOL
 
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Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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True enough, some terminology that is common in the US might not translate well worldwide.
I also realize we are spoiled with many sources we can buy from.

Mount into a frame.... funny!
 

Framar

WOW Framer
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Jul 24, 2001
Messages
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To give my old boss a bit of leeway in his terminology, the guy he bought the business from came from the era when framers had no form of communication with each other and none of them would ever have dreamed of sharing hard-earned trade secrets with their rivals. And lots of time, like Indiana Jones, we were just making things up as we went along.

This boss used to subscribe to DECOR magazine but he forbade any of his employees from "wasting their time" by reading it and he eventually burned all of the back issues I had so carefully sorted and indexed.
 

nzsky

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Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
7
Thank you for the clarification. Yes lots of differences in terminology especially 'backing board' used to describe mount board, especially confusing when a very well known photographer / tutor does a youtube video showing his framing technique for a 'fine art' photograph and mounts the picture directly onto foam board, no moisture barrier, no sealing, no dust cover.
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
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To answer one of your questions, rag board is not typically marked by any of the manufacturers. That allows the full use of either side.

Acid Free is old school and even then was a bit misleading. It generally means that if you were to measure the pH at the point of manufacture, it would register at 7 or above. This term was notoriously used on pulpwood mats that had been buffered with Calcium Carbonate which was measures acid free (neutral or slightly basic) when first made. As the pulpwood deteriorated through oxidation and gave off acidic gas, the CaCO3 was used up and the mats became acidic, as did the interior environment of the frame. The caveat is to question anything that lays claim to that attribute. Ammonia is "acid free".
 

nzsky

Grumbler in Training
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May 21, 2020
Messages
7
Thanks Wally, appreciate the info. I'm using cotton mat and cotton mount board for the reasons you outlined. Speaking of gas, I'll be sealing the glass/mat/art/mount-board as a unit, ie taping the sides, with 'acid free' foam board, whatever the term is worth, as a backer behind that, and I'm wondering how many framers would seal the back (of the sealed unit) completely with a foil moisture barrier? I haven't found much info on that and have read some framers never do. The art is ltd edition photo prints on cotton paper (canson rag photographique) and a few on Canson Baryta Prestige which is an alpha cellulose / cotton mix (yes some buffered wood pulp, but the best compromise for the work).
And also thanks to admin for one of the most most civilised and helpful forum I've come across, some of the photography forums just devolve into online fisticuffs, so thank you.
Andrew
 
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CB Art & Framing

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
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Feb 20, 2007
Messages
2,120
This is what we call Artist tape. It is like acid free masking tape. Useful for hinging small, generic photos, back of foam board when joining pieces, fillets, packaging etc. I don’t use it in anything of value.
 

wpfay

Angry Badger
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Sealed Frame Technology is something that is under constant review by the preservationist in the industry. It was the thing to do at one point, with metalized film (Marvelseal) used to create a complete jacket for the art and mat/glass package. The problem was/is creating that perfect vapor proof seal. The current trend is toward using protective barriers (UV Acrylic, and puncture resistant backing panels) and scheduling routine maintenance and inspection. What was happening is, if there was a suspected failure in the seal, the piece had to be removed from the frame, and the process completely redone. The thought of doing it once and forgetting about it didn't pay out.

Tape sealing the rag board mat/mount package to the glass is fine for limiting dust and critters from the frame package, but attempting a vapor seal has proven to be more effort than it is worth. Keeping the environment where the art resides at a stable temperature and humidity, and planned inspection inside the frame is easier. Using elements such as Tyvek dust jackets that restrict vapor flow does help mitigate sudden environmental changes, and isolating the foam board support by wrapping it in metalized film to restrict outgassing both help.

Alpha Cellulose is pretty much identical to cotton chemically. Being more highly processed the fiber is shorter, so the paper made from it has a different feel. Buffering is done to counteract the presence of acidic gasses in the atmospheric environment. If you want unbuffered boards (AKA Photomount Board), they are available for some forms of traditional photography, but not necessary for ink jet prints.
 
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