Strip-Lining HUGE Canvas...HELP

froptop

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I've done an archive search but need the BOTTOM LINE...What would you do??

Canvas is new, 52" x 90" and the image is up to the edge on both long margins. The client doesn't want to sacrifice any of it, of course. And it is getting a frame.

I've never worked with BEVA:
-should/could a complete novice undertake this?
-along this line, can I use any other adhesive like Formula 4000 and canvas or poly from the fab. store? Would anything else stand up to the pull?

What about hand-stitching a strip lining?
-will it really hold without tearing/perforating the canvas, leading to bigger problem?
-at 90" long, will I end up with uneven or inconsistant tension?

What about attaching on the 'face' of the canvas to a stretcher/strainer, staples hiding under rabbet.

Or, attaching entire canvas to support, like Luan, or other lining procedure???

In the archive search, some say hand-stitching is still the best way, others say BEVA is best and QUICK and EASY(even for a beginner?...I don't want to do any harm)... Some say go to a conservator.... Or do I just tell the client he'll have to loose a couple of inches of image, top and bottom, and then stretch this monstrosity like any other? Can't help but feel that any potential for problem is magnified because of the size of the canvas...52"x 90"!!!!

What's a mother to do?? Thank you, one and all, for any suggestions...Have a great day
 

JFeig

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And what was the intent of the artist?

If you have the responst that the owner is the artist........they might have to lose some if their presious work surface...........Can the artist say "plan ahead"
 

froptop

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The new, proud owner is not the artist...and I already talked to the artist regarding future works, but of course, that won't help me here and now.
 

Rob Markoff

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You need to consider three things here:

First, if you don't want to lose any of the image you will need to strip line the canvas.

Second, and more importantly, you cannot assume that even without strip lining you will be able to properly and evenly stretch a canvas that large without mechanical assistance, meaning a keyable stretcher bar with keyable cross supports in both directions, (over 90" we would have two cross supports) either with traditional keys, or with mechanical fasteners. You can get both from Simon Liu, or very good traditional bars in custom sizes from Foster Planing Mill.

Sewing IS NOT the answer and has only been done in the past by those who do not know better or have access to the proper materials. (The same is true for framers who insist that the back of a canvas needs air holes so "it can breathe". It is OLD WIVESTALE knowledge without foundation.)

Sewing will actually weaken the edge because of the close perferations and with a piece as large as you are doing, it is almost impossible to get adequate tension so as not to cause problems for stretching.

BEVA and 8xx polyester are the proper materials to use. Yes, it is easy and those who are suggesting something else have most likely never heard of it, or have used it, or are too cheap (BEVA is expensive) or don't know to where to buy it. Ask anyone who suggests an alternate method if they have also used BEVA and 8xx polyester.......

It is like hinging media; until Hayaku or Nori many framers had all sorts of excuses as to why they were continuing to use alternative methods of conservation hinging including all sorts of pressure sensitive media like 3M micro-pore tape.
It was too much "work" or inconvenient to mix up the proper paste.

Any other kind of "glue" does not meet conservation standards because it is not easily reversible, may not have the elasticity needed, and unless it is some form of "contact cement" (which is WRONG), will not adequately bond unless you use long clamping boards and clamps, and allow the glue to properly dry. Then, what are you strip lining WITH? Be sure that whatever you use (and I really think 8xx polyester is the answer) has the strength you need to pull, has the "give" you need to allow the canvas to be tensioned, and won't show a "lump" under the canvas from the face in case you need to run it beyond the original tacking margin to support the area where the canvas folds over the bead.

Thirdly:

It is important to PRACTICE any procedure (gluing, sewing, using BEVA) on something other than customer's art. At trade shows, there are hundreds of unstrteched "Chinese Prison Labor Camp" paintings for sale (and yes, the classes taught use them for practice too). Or, go to thrift stores and buy old paintings. Cut them off the stretchers and practice on them.

Another important tip, you must work on a piece like this FACE DOWN and pull the canvas towards the back using aluminum head steel push pins to work the piece until you have it properly aligned and tensioned. Then, and only then, start stapling, replacing the push pins as you go. Then, use the mechanical advantage of the keyable bars to properly tension the canvas. You cannot properly stretch this piece while it is vertical or face up because the weight of the canvas will distort proper tension as you are stretching. You need to remove the tension by supporting the canvas on a clean, flat surface, preferably lined with something like coroplast, or release boards.

I am the KING of BEVA.
 

stud d

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Ok Beva s! Anyway if you need a source for expandable stretchers (Lebron stretchers) here on the east side you can call Kate at Archival Arts Services in Washington, DC at 202.667.3575. They should be able to help you and they can make the stretcher so it can be broken down.
Good luck
Patrick Leeland
 

froptop

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Thanks for the insight and advice...makes my day a little easier. Will probably decide tomorrow what we're doing.
 
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