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Stained Glass...

Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

danny boy

PFG, Picture Framing God
Rest In Peace
Joined
Dec 18, 2004
Messages
5,396
Location
Oregon's Bay Area
... is 24x33, cathedral arch at the top. Heavy, thick glass, leaded and all. In- Line Ovals will build the frame to suit. I can use points to hold it in the frame. Any creative ways of making this look sharp from the back as well as the front? It will hang by chains in a kitchen window, and will be visable from both sides. Thanks.
 

stshof

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 16, 2002
Messages
1,194
Location
Ohatchee, AL
No creative ideas, sorry, but just an observation. Have you worked with leaded glass before? I took in a couple antique pieces and found out I'm subject to severe migranes when exposed to lead. Had to work with them for short periods at a time until I was able to complete them and move 'em out. So if you start getting headaches...:kaffeetrinker_2:
 

Dave

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Messages
13,355
Location
Edwardsburg, MI
Danny,

I've done quite a few ...mostly that had to look good from both sides.

I may mention some obvious things that you are already aware of, but better said than not.

Leaded and stain glass is quite fragile and needs a substantial frame to give it support. The glass easily sags and when you work on it be sure to support it from below so it doesn't sustain damage from any force including the force gravity will exert from the heavy glass and leading itself. If it is in a particularly fragile state you may want to consider either restoration or glazing over the surface.

Do not clean anything off the window except for dust and stuff that a good glass cleaner takes off. I usually discuss this quite thoroughly with the client before even removing any paint splatters on flat surfaces of the glass itself.

Old stain glass windows develope quite a character of dirt and grime and paint splatters and who knows what which is quite often considered "character" and highly desireable. The patina the lead acquires over a long life shouldn't be disturbed. Cleaning or, God forbid, buffing the lead is akin to painting antique natural wood furniture in most collector's eyes. If a client wants cleaning beyond taking off the cobwebs and paint on the glass itself I always try to talk them out of it and usually successfully.

I don't know if the antique aspect applies to your piece but quite likley does.

As far as making it look good from both sides:

If hanging in a window the front of the frame usually should face out into the room. I finish the back of the frame in any number of ways with stains, etc. usually to blend with the front and put a simple quarter round moulding available from Lowes,, Home Depot, or your local modeling hobby shop stained or finished to match. Sometimes I'll get more creative and choose a moulding that has a rope design or some other motif that fits the clients decor and setting. The flat back of a frame moulding lends itself well to either another decorative moulding strip on the surface or other types of ornamental surface mounted decoration. When using a quarter round moulding to finish the back of the frame package I don't know of any reason to use points and never have. The moulding can be drilled and counter sink brads to hold it tight to the frame and then putty or whaterver it takes to make it look good.

One problem I have often encountered is that most frame mouldings are not meant to be seen from both sides so don't forget to factor in hand sanding and finishing to your quote to remove any unsightly stains. And nicks in the back are a problem here to where on other frames they just get covered with a dustcover and it doesn't make any difference.

If you are working with a curved surface you can steam the moulding and then nail into place and let it conform to the existing frame.

Be aware that any frame that hangs in a window is going to be quite suseptible to UV damage epecially if south facing. I know of no damage to the stain glass or leading UV could cause, but moulding finishes and stains should have some type of UV protection or overcoating to minimize damage and extend the life of the finish. For good UV protection varnishes go talk to the oldest salt at your local marine supply store.

I usually try to find some antique brass fittings for the top to attached some sort of old looking brass chain for hanging. Again be sure if you are supplying the hanging hardware that it is substantial enough and anchored in such a way it won't give way. Brass decorative surface mounted decorations look great too. I prefer them unpolished.

Can't think of anything else and my stomach is saying "feed me" so I better heed it's demands!

Have fun!

Dave Makielski
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Pittsburgh
Hello Grumblers - I am putting a 12 x 48" stained glass piece into a sturdy frame (Studio 26101). The customer does not care about how the back side looks, as it faces outdoors/neighbors hedge. She has supplied the chain from which the new frame should hang. I am not sure what hardware/hanging apparatus I should attach to the top or sides of this frame in order that - long-term - the chain and hanging hardware and/or screws will hold. (I did read another thread suggesting screw eyes attached on side arms in order that the gravity over time wouldn't be a factor? Can someone point me in the right direction, please? Thanks much!
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

Gary Tanner

Grumbler
Joined
Dec 6, 2020
Messages
19
Location
Bennington, Vermont
Business
Retired Exec. Director
I'd be inclined to have the frame builder make a two-piece frame that is the same on both sides and have them mill a dado in both halves that will accept the glass piece. Put the glass in and join the two halves (many ways to do that unobtrusively). Yes, if the glass becomes damaged, the frame might be wrecked taking it apart, depending upon how it was put together. My ex did stained glass along these lines, and I built several frames for her this way. Looks great (and identical) from both sides. And can be nice and stout for hanging.
Gary
 

Greg Fremstad

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
941
Location
Eugene OR
All of the weight of the glass will rest on the bottom frame rail. Make sure the bottom frame joints are reinforced and as mentioned above, hanging hardware should be on the vertical frame rails near the top. Also what Dave said. He hit the most important parts perfectly. We have such generous and talented framers on this site. Feel lucky!
 
Joined
Apr 10, 2017
Messages
15
Location
Pittsburgh
Thanks for this help, but my main question was about the hardware from which the chain will hang (best attached from the side of the vertical rails, I understand)? The 'antique brass fittings' suggested above sound right, but in what form/shape: drawer handle? hook/pull of some kind? My searches aren't bringing up anything that seems right.

I am grateful for all this very generous & talented help, yes, thank you!!!
 

Melinda Tennis

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 10, 2002
Messages
385
Location
Lynchburg, VA.
Business
Melinda's
Xylo makes a stained glass moulding. You put 3 sides together, slide the glass in and assemble the 4th side. Sanded and or finished both sides, #BST-1 or #BST-2. Xylo - 800-627-5040
 
Hoffmann Dovetail Joining System
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