Speaking of Strainer Bars

Kittyfaces

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Feb 23, 2004
Posts
359
Location
Kennebunk, Maine
Hi Everyone... I'm new!

The shop I was trained by never used strainer bars to reinforce frame packages that needed the extra strength. Now I have my own shop and want to do things the quality way...

What are the best methods to secure the strainer to the frame? How should it fit into the back of the frame... standard allowance?
 
Strainers need to be as close to flush with the cheek of the rabbet as possible (snug fit). If you have an allowance you will put unnecessary strain on the joints of the frame and the glazing.

The classic way of attachment it to drill through the strainer at an angle and screw through the strainer into the body of the frame. There are countersink bits specifically designed for this or you can get an inexpensive pocket cutter ($200.00) that will be much more consistent than a hand held drill.

This brings about a question: Why don't any of the suppliers of millwork offer a pre-drilled strainer bar?

Welcome to the Grumble. It was a good question...even more so since you are questioning your training. We would all do well to review those thing we take as SOP.
 
Originally posted by wpfay:
This brings about a question: Why don't any of the suppliers of millwork offer a pre-drilled strainer bar?
I've had virtually no calll for it. It would be quite expensive to do, but there is an alternative that we have done on a custom basis and would consider adding as an option. That is making an angled groove along the entire length so that you are essentially drilling at 90º. That way you can use a regular old drill and countersink.
 
Thanks! By the way... would this sort of strainer be made from the same stock for stretching canvas or would a trip to the lumber yard suffice?
 
If you are going to the lumber yard, look for
clear stock. Knots in wood have no place in
a frame. Standard 1X2 = 3/4" X 1 1/2", is easy
to find and works well, but it may be too thick
to for some frames. If you can get something
milled, 1/2" X 2-3" tulip (poplar) is useful.
Beyond, that, what wally said.

Hugh
 
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