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W.D Quinn Saw Co. - US Made Picture Frame Blades

Silk scarf

Ylva

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I just received a last minute call from a customer who is coming in tomorrow morning.
She has a 'valuable' silk scarf she would like framed. No idea of value, but knowing this customer, it might be quite valuable.

She wants the edges shown. There is apparently a seam on the top, so I can stitch a little bit.

DCO seems to be the best method.

I know plexi is the preferred method. What would be the disadvantages of using glass? She usually uses MG on her pieces, I doubt she will want to spend for Optium.
The scarf is, according to her, about 24"x24"

I assume it is better to use a fabric mat, to create more 'grip'.

Any other tips and/or tricks?
So far silk scarfs coming in, people always wanted a mat to cover the edges. The only time that wasn't the case, the customer wanted cheap, didn't care and it was not a valuable piece.

Any advice welcome!
 

Shayla

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From what I've heard, the disadvantage of pressing it to glass is the potential for mildew from moisture damage.

A few years ago, we did this sheer hanky from a World's Fair. It had a Museum Acrylic DCO against it, with a mat over the acrylic. Then, museum glass over the mat. The DCO was great, because it was so sheer that stitches would have shown. (The hanky was about 10 x 10". If she's fine with stitching, you might stitch it to a larger backing, then mat with a wider window, under Museum Glass. Here's the one we did:

framing worlds fair hanky resize dco framing june 2017  IMG_1705 (2).jpg

If she doesn't like the look of this idea, then she can decide whether she cares more about reflections, money or mildew. :)
 

neilframer

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I have 2- 32" x 34" valuable silk scarves that I'm about to frame in the shop.
We did one previously for this customer and she was pleased.

In our case, the scarves will be matted and not showing the edge.
We will stretch the scarves slightly over the center of a reverse bevel fabric mat and then the center will be put back into the mat from the back.

The disadvantage of glass with a DCO is the possible issue with temperature conduction and condensation possible on the inside of the glass and touching the silk scarf.

If she doesn't want to spend for the Optium, what about just using Conservation UV Acrylic?
 
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Lafontsee

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Just spit-balling here, but what about a tulle overlay? If you can find something fine enough in the right color, you might be able to stretch tulle over the top of the scarf with a lightly-padded fabric behind it. You could then space the Museum Glass away from the overlay.

James
 

wpfay

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DCO usually requires a fairly stiff backing with a layer of batting and then fabric over that. I have had issues with DCO with sheer silk because the pressure is greater at the perimeter and the silk tends to creep toward the center and bunch up.
I would consider stretching a piece of fabric for the backing, pinning the scarf in place, and then sewing it down.
I'm going to find out again about DCO and silk because I have a US Air Force pilot's chit (instructions printed on silk for the fliers to give anyone should they be shot down) to frame, and the owner wants to see the edges.
What the other's said, no glass.
 
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Jim Miller

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Yes Ylva, DCO probably would be best in this case. As Lafontsee suggested, a fine-mesh fabric DCO would work, but I suggest using Crepeline (French silk organdy), which has a much finer weave than tulle. A silk overlay usually disappears on a textile item.

If you want to use an acrylic DCO, Conservation Clear Acrylic would be suitable, but your customer might consider the almost-invisible effect of Museum Optium Acrylic to be worth the extra price. Never use glass for a DCO. As others have said, moisture is the problem, and it happens when there's a rapid or radical change of temperature; higher humidity accelerates the condensation. For a full understanding of how that happens, learn about dew point condensation.

For a 24" square scarf, I would probably use a fabric background over two or three layers of polyester batting, with the top layer about 12" square, the middle layer about 18" square, and the bottom layer about 20" to 23" square, on top of a rigid backing . A sheet of 2 mm ACM would be my first choice, but 8 mm or 10 mm Coroplast should be OK, too. When fitting be sure to compress the framing package enough to totally flatten the batting.

I have had issues with DCO with sheer silk because the pressure is greater at the perimeter and the silk tends to creep toward the center and bunch up.
Wally, do you have any pictures showing this problem? If you use a smaller layer of batting on top, that tends to even-out the pressure enough to avoid bunching in the center when you compress the package during fitting.
 
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Ylva

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Sorry to reply so late to all this great information. (I did read most of it before customer came in)

She did not want to go with optium. She did chose a fabric mat, which she fell in love with and is very complimentary to the scarf. She told me the scarf alone is worth about $1500

Tulle won't work well in this case. I do like the 'concentric layering' and will do that.

Although the scarf went to a high end dry cleaner, they didn't treat it right. Looks like they got all the creases and wrinkles out, and then folded it over one of those awful dryclean hangers, which caused a new case of bunching up the silk.

Most of it will be pressed flat with the acrylic. She did choose to go with the conservation clear acrylic.

She is very excited about the choices she made and I explained all the pros and cons of all different methods. She did appreciate the explanations.
 

julietheframer

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From what I've heard, the disadvantage of pressing it to glass is the potential for mildew from moisture damage.

A few years ago, we did this sheer hanky from a World's Fair. It had a Museum Acrylic DCO against it, with a mat over the acrylic. Then, museum glass over the mat. The DCO was great, because it was so sheer that stitches would have shown. (The hanky was about 10 x 10". If she's fine with stitching, you might stitch it to a larger backing, then mat with a wider window, under Museum Glass. Here's the one we did:

View attachment 35935

If she doesn't like the look of this idea, then she can decide whether she cares more about reflections, money or mildew. :)
Sorry, dah. What’s DCO? I can see I have been away from the grumble too long.🤪
 
W.D Quinn Saw Co. - US Made Picture Frame Blades

neilframer

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Sorry, dah. What’s DCO? I can see I have been away from the grumble too long.🤪
A DCO is a Direct Contact Overlay.
It refers to using the Acrylic pressing on the object or fabric being framed to hold it in place when stitches or other methods can't be used.
Acrylic is preferred rather than glass because glass is much more subject to temperature changes and can get condensation on the inside that touches the fabric where acrylic is much less likely to get condensation.
 
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Ylva

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My customer decided to go with conservation acrylic. She didn't want to spend the money on optium.
I have different batting materials so will experiment a little with that, as well as the layering. She is in no hurry and wants me to take my time to experiment a little.
Fun project for sure!
 

GreyDrakkon

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Although the scarf went to a high end dry cleaner, they didn't treat it right. Looks like they got all the creases and wrinkles out, and then folded it over one of those awful dryclean hangers, which caused a new case of bunching up the silk.
Silk responds really well to a gentle steaming. With garments you can even leave it in a steamy bathroom and the wrinkles will come out.
 
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