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Seaming Glass

picture framing clamps by MasterClamp 2021

Shayla

WOW Framer
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This is what our glass seamer looks like. (Photo from online, but looks the same.) Is it still the best way, or has something better been invented in the past umpteen years? Writing this brings to mind some Grumblers saying they swipe the glass edge with sand-paper-covered wood. Any other favorite ways?

shayla glass seamer.jpg
 
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snafu

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
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GA

Matthew Hale

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
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pretty much any abrasive will do it - I've used several different sanding blocks. The nice thing about the tool you're referencing is that it hits both edges in one swipe. the downside to that tool is that it's expensive! We just replaced the stones in ours, and i think it was about $50 for just the stones. it's still my preferred method.
 
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David Hewitt

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
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Sharping stones are big enough to protect your hands and are the least expensive, but they will develop a wear groove over time. My favorite is the diamond. Last a very long time and cuts much faster. The ones made of steel cannot break and probably will last you forever. If you have exposed glass, the diamond will shape the edges quickly. Coarse, fine, and extra fine will cover all your needs.


70c3526c-7df2-41bc-9931-31fe450c717c_1.a78968ebfe19f2186772d0d4729733cc.jpeg
dmtd6.jpg
 
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Shayla

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Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

Greg Fremstad

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Sep 4, 2002
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Eugene OR
Yes, seaming the glass does make it easier and safer to apply FrameSpace. In our shop, we seamed every piece of glass going into a frame. If you leave the very sharp edges on the glass, as it shifts around in the frame (like when you use a point driver) the glass will shave off bits of wood, paint, or leaf off the frame the rabbet. Guess where it ends up? Flumbs! It also makes it easier, faster, and safer to clean the glass and you'll probably do a better job cleaning the glass around the edges without getting bits of rag dust in the frame.
 

Nikodeumus

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Apr 21, 2015
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Comox, BC, Canada
Regarding seaming glass....Doesn't it leave little tiny bits of glass dust that needs to be cleaned off?
When I have a dull glass cutting wheel, tiny shards of glass dust will sometimes "stick" to the sheet and can be a real pain to remove from any of the coated types of glass.
(I know, I know. I shouldn't have dull cutting wheels. But I don't know it's dull until it is.)
I really like having a frame package ready, quickly cut the glass, put it in place and seal the whole thing up.
No need to clean anything.
Having said that, safety is more important than convenience.
So am likely going to start seaming as well.
 

David Hewitt

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IMHO, Seaming shows professionalism and consideration. Nobody now or in the future of the framings travel will get cut from the sharp edges, cleaning that glass will be easier and safer in its future. I recommend always cleaning the glass, if only buffing with a good towel.
As far as shards and dust. If you do down strokes and away from the glass, you'll have less debris. Also when cleaning glass with sharp edges, every time the rag touches the edge of the glass the glass will shave it, creating lots of lint fibers.
 

Shayla

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Although it's good to do, I rarely seam glass. When I do, I wear a mask, to avoid breathing glass dust.
 

framah

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Degobah
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death star driver
I use what you showed in your original post and have been for the whole time I have been open.

Always seam the glass and no one will bleed on the art as well as all of the other reasons posted here.
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

monkframe

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Yes, the tool you illustrate is the one I've used for many years. I took a class from Jim Miller many years ago and he recommended seaming all glass. I have never found it necessary for wood frames, but it's important to do for metal frames as they will chip shards from the glass edge unless seamed.
 

MarkF

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Oct 21, 2001
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Minneapolis
I use a whetstone on all 8 edges and the corners for glass over about 24x36, especially with metal frames that put a lot of point pressure on the glass. Shayla's advice is important, wear a mask and spray with water or glass cleaner before you swipe the edges to keep the silica dust out of the air.
 

Melinda Tennis

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I have used a whetstone and Shayla's tool. I recently was given glass seamers from a former stained glass artist. They are a metal grid adhered to a thick foam back. They come in 60 to 220 grit, and can be used wet or dry. The 220 worked really fast, two swipes per side. The company is Calibre, stone cutting and polishing tools.
 
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realhotglass

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
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Feb 20, 2003
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654
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Adelaide - South Australia
We use this type of diamond coated pad, they past ages, 200g is good for glass used in framing or window glazing.

71fnf++Ay6L._AC_SL1355_.jpg


Just google diamond pad glass seamer.

A swipe up and back, reverse the process so you get a swipe each way on each side, turn and repeat 4 x (or around if doing a circle or oval, portrait glass, etc)

The best parts about edging glass for picture framing ?

It's safer for handling, right through from cutting to fitting and replacing if ever needed.
The dulled edges will not shave lightly in the back of the rebate with movement, and the glass will move slightly in the frame over years of moving etc.
Glass is less prone to breakage ! Unseamed glass will break easier if impacted, a seamed edge is stronger because any little inconsistencies of a raw edge are taken off.

@Shayla I'm REALLY surprised to see you using that seamer.
It's made for more heavy duty glass work, usually 3mm and up to around 6mm.
I would have thought it too course to do a fine job on picture framing glass, but hey, if it's working for you :)
 

Rick Granick

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Here is one that Rob Markoff recommended in his recent PFM article. It is available in the US through Tech Mark, a distributor of Lion framing products.

:cool: Rick
 

Shayla

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We use this type of diamond coated pad, they past ages, 200g is good for glass used in framing or window glazing.

71fnf++Ay6L._AC_SL1355_.jpg




@Shayla I'm REALLY surprised to see you using that seamer.
It's made for more heavy duty glass work, usually 3mm and up to around 6mm.
I would have thought it too course to do a fine job on picture framing glass, but hey, if it's working for you :)
Thank you so much for your comments, both on this and the mirror thread. The reason I've been using it is that I lacked knowledge.
I'm not a framing expert, just a friendly lady with a frame shop, and I'm always happy to learn. I very much appreciate the information shared here. :)
 
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