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Sealing framing package with magic tape 810

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tombe

Grumbler
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Mason City, IA 50401
Business
Benish Studios
Do most of you seal the framing package of most things. Frametek way with magic tape. Also, is just one layer of tape ok? How about 8x10 to 11x14 or inexpensive posters? If using a mat(s) and backing board with foamcore support, do you include foamcore? I use coroplast support on many things. Tried in the past sealing but on the fence about sealing for all things. What may not need it? What are your feelings on sealing things? Don't see problems with almost all things I have done over the years. probably more question after I see how this goes. Seems like could be a problem in many cases even if tape came off easy.
 

Shayla

WOW Framer
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Apr 5, 2008
Messages
32,283
Location
Washington State
Hi, tombe. Are you referring to taping the glass and mat together before fitting into the frame? If so, I sometimes do it with white mats, or frames that might sift random bits into the fitting. When I do, I use Filmoplast. But that doesn't necessarily mean Filmoplast is the best thing to use. It's just what I do. I think Magic Tape stays on better, (and is probably cheaper?), but I like that Filmoplast is easy to remove if something has still managed to get in. Most of the time, we don't tape mat and glass together.
 

Joe B

PFG, Picture Framing God
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5,522
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Blaine, Minnesota
I have very seldom sealed the entire package, glass to including the backing. I have never tried Magic Tape and I don't know that I ever would because it may not stay adhered. When I do seal the package it is because it is going to be displayed in a high humidity environment - lake setting, bathroom, & high humidity basement are a few of the examples. I think that if we lived in a high humidity location the sealing may be required but here in Minnesota and Iowa, though there are a few days that we have high humidity, generally we are just humid enough to not harm the art.
There may be extenuating circumstances where complete sealing the glass to the backing material may be required. An example is a business setting where the art is in a entry area where there is quick temperature changes when doors are opening and closing, especially here in a climate where the weather outside is 10 degrees below zero and the office is 70 degree above zero.
 

Greg Fremstad

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
952
Location
Eugene OR
Maybe read the article on the frametek.com webpage titled "stop the dust pump". Tape sealing is fast and easy and will save more time than it takes if you have to get back in a frame to get out some flecks of dust, leaf, wood, or paint. Read the bit at the end that describes a quick way of lining up the tape.
 
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tombe

Grumbler
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Mason City, IA 50401
Business
Benish Studios
Hi, tombe. Are you referring to taping the glass and mat together before fitting into the frame? If so, I sometimes do it with white mats, or frames that might sift random bits into the fitting. When I do, I use Filmoplast. But that doesn't necessarily mean Filmoplast is the best thing to use. It's just what I do. I think Magic Tape stays on better, (and is probably cheaper?), but I like that Filmoplast is easy to remove if something has still managed to get in. Most of the time, we don't tape mat and glass together.
I was referring to the glass, mats, and mountboard as the frame package as an option and the support backing as separate although I know it is often included. This is before going into frame. Sealing the package. Haven't done it in the past and haven't had much in the way of problems.
 

tombe

Grumbler
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Mason City, IA 50401
Business
Benish Studios
Maybe read the article on the frametek.com webpage titled "stop the dust pump". Tape sealing is fast and easy and will save more time than it takes if you have to get back in a frame to get out some flecks of dust, leaf, wood, or paint. Read the bit at the end that describes a quick way of lining up the tape.
Thanks Greg. You were very helpful when I talked to you. Just getting an idea what others are doing or not doing.
 

tombe

Grumbler
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Mason City, IA 50401
Business
Benish Studios
Do most of you seal the framing package of most things. Frametek way with magic tape. Also, is just one layer of tape ok? How about 8x10 to 11x14 or inexpensive posters? If using a mat(s) and backing board with foamcore support, do you include foamcore? I use coroplast support on many things. Tried in the past sealing but on the fence about sealing for all things. What may not need it? What are your feelings on sealing things? Don't see problems with almost all things I have done over the years. probably more question after I see how this goes. Seems like could be a problem in many cases even if tape came off easy.
By framing package I was referring to the glass, mats, mountboard, etc. and sealing that up before it went into the frame. Was not referring to sealing frame which is a different subject. AS stated, I am on the fence about doing it for all things or even most. Opinion needed.
 

tombe

Grumbler
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
16
Location
Mason City, IA 50401
Business
Benish Studios
By framing package I was referring to the glass, mats, mountboard, etc. and sealing that up before it went into the frame. Was not referring to sealing frame which is a different subject. AS stated, I am on the fence about doing it for all things or even most. Opinion needed.
I did read frametek article on it and found it very helpful and that is why I am on the fence. Have hardly had any problem with things. Would think larger things would be a real headache especially if you had to get into after taped up. I know there is a time when doing it would be helpful, but for everything is a problem for me. I vacuum around the edge of the fitted piece before putting a dust cover on to get anything stray at that time. Tried with frame spacer an that didn't go that great. Not terribly hard to do, but could be a very nerve racking thing if I needed to undo.
 
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Shayla

WOW Framer
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Washington State
I did read frametek article on it and found it very helpful and that is why I am on the fence. Have hardly had any problem with things. Would think larger things would be a real headache especially if you had to get into after taped up. I know there is a time when doing it would be helpful, but for everything is a problem for me. I vacuum around the edge of the fitted piece before putting a dust cover on to get anything stray at that time. Tried with frame spacer an that didn't go that great. Not terribly hard to do, but could be a very nerve racking thing if I needed to undo.
Sometimes, before a potentially tricky fitting (or if using acrylic), I mist the air ahead of time. And for such fittings, it also helps to avoid fluffy clothes. My helper once had a fitting where she couldn't figure out how these tiny red fibers kept getting inside. I didn't know this was happening, until she finally had an 'aha' moment. She was using a lint brush on the mat, then absent-mindedly brushing it on the leg of her jeans thinking that would help clear the bristles. She suddenly realized that her red corduroy pants were causing the problem.
 

Nikodeumus

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
1,119
Location
Comox, BC, Canada
I also do tape the package on occasion, the full package from glass to the backer board.
This is not a default policy for everything, only when I feel it's required, which isn't all that often.
It's on a case-by-case basis for me.
Mostly I do it when I have already tried to fit the item into a frame and repeatedly find little flums creeping in when the action of driving the points shakes little flecks and things loose.
As Shayla said, it's mostly with larger white matts, (OR anything with lots of black) that the flums are most noticeable.
Also, certain kinds of frames tend to "shed" more than others.
 

Prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,406
Location
The Grand Duchy of Lincolnyshire
I have done this as a matter of course for years. I got the idea from a rep and was originally for sealing
ally frames. The advantages are obvious to me. Once you have the internal glass/matting/back in one unit
you know it can be set aside and nothing can get in. I usually do all this prior the making the frame.
Assembling the package face-up allows you to spot any bits though the glass. Trying to do it face-down
with the glass in the frame is a total no-no for me. If the elements can be separated then the inrush of air will pull
in every nearby particle.
The tape is unimportant, as long as it remains sticky. In certain areas and in certain climates there can be a
plague of little black flies, particularly at harvest time. These critters are the scourge of glazed art. the tape
acts against them in two ways: They try to wriggle under the tape and get stuck. They go over and go around
the back. They never go into the frame via the backs. Always the front. They land on the glass and wriggle under
the rabbet. Why they do this is anyone's guess, but they can be highly damaging to paper-borne artwork.
 

Lafontsee

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Sep 2, 2009
Messages
451
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
We generally seal the whole edge of the mat glass and backer together to keep stuff out. The only situation I would avoid it on is if you are using optically coated glass (Museum, AR, etc.) and the artwork is intended to be changed periodically. Tape leaves a residue on the optical coating that is just a pain to clean up when swapping the contents of the frame.

James
 
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