Scarf backing

Larry01

Grumbler in Training
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Hello! I have a question. I have sewn a silk scarf to some fabric and I was originally going to mounted onto foam core, stitching the edges together behind the foam core but decided to stretch it onto Stretch bars. As the fabric is really fine, I don’t think I could stretch it without it ripping. I know the most preferred method is DCO but as I’m quite green I don’t feel confident doing that. What surface should I so the scarf and fabric to? I was thinking unprimed canvas but I was hoping for it to be white or cream. I think prime canvas might be too hard to stitch through. Any suggestions would be really appreciated thank you! :)
 

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I feel like DCO is the least risk for the least experienced, especially with so many threads on here of how to do it, but since you've already mounted it to a fabric substrate, why don't you just pin that(or lace) with gentle tension around mat/foamcore? I agree that something this delicate doesn't need to be stretched as hard as a canvas around wooden stretchers. You could still DCO with acrylic after that or mount to show some fabric like a mat and use spacers to lift glass off, making sure the spacers rest on the mounting fabric rather than the silk
 
Thank you for your reply! Do you feel I could use the clear overlay mount with one sheet of polyester film and canvas stretched as the backing? I’m wondering if the canvas wouldn’t have enough static charge to hold it in place?

Many thanks 🙏🏼
 
Thank you for your reply! Do you feel I could use the clear overlay mount with one sheet of polyester film and canvas stretched as the backing? I’m wondering if the canvas wouldn’t have enough static charge to hold it in place?

Many thanks 🙏🏼
No. Not film. This isn't a wrap. You need the structure of a sheet of acrylic, and a rigid backing, to provide pressure against the piece and to compress the batting. It is friction that holds everything in place. Not static.
:cool: Rick
 
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I did my first DCO recently with a smaller piece of a cotton Tshirt. Following the techniques in Jim's book, along with reading other threads on the subject here on the Grumble, I found the process easy to learn.

Customer picked it up a few days ago and was extremely impressed.

I'm going to do another DCO to have on display to make it easier to show customers exactly how amazing the finished product looks.
 
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