"SAW STOP" New safety feature

Rick Granick

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On NPR's "All Things Considered" program there was a story about a recently-developed technology which stops a rotating table saw blade before it can do serious damage to human flesh. It responds to the elctrical conductivity of the skin. While apparently quite effective (amazingly), it is controversial, because saw manufacturers are reluctant to include the feature on saws due to the costs involved (it could double the price of low-end saws) and potential liability issues.

Here is a link to NPR's web page about the story. You can listen to the story and/or view a short video demonstration of the technology, using a hot dog to represent a finger (they have similar conductivity factors).

SAW STOP link

Not sure what to think about this. Table saws freak me out anyway. I'm more of a bandsaw kind of guy. This could help. Now if they could only find a way to keep them from hurling small workpieces at you at hundreds of MPH.

Any experienced table saw people out there have any opinions on this?

:cool: Rick
 

Bob Doyle

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Man I gotta say that is one convincing video!

I still winced when I watched it! Is the technology on the blade or the saw itself? My fear would be getting used to a table saw that has the technology then going home and using the "real Thing" and lopping my finger off!
 

wpfay

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Hmmm. It solves but one of the many ways to seriously injure yourself on a table saw.
Most of the really bad accidents caused by blades involve loose clothing and the inevitable
"operator error".
I've been nicked once...about as bad at the hot dog got...on the tip of a finger.
It would probably be a good featue on a home craftsman style saw, but I'm not too sure about the acceptance on industrial saws. OSHA has mandated so many safety features on modern woodworking equipment that the operator is already frustrated.
The best saftey is proper operation of the tool.

Rick, use a push stick. Avoid kickbacks. If the saw is really throwing stuff back at you it may be out of adjustment. There are also anti-kickback devices that can be added to the saw. They also reduce the tendancy for the wood to bind the blade.
 

Phoneguy

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Wow, impressive, might even let my kids use the tools, then again?
Biggest question from watching that video. Why the heck was the blade extended so far through the wood. That is really, really dangerous....read...don't do this at home. It does make for an impressive display though!
 

Framerguy

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That little nick in the hotdog is still too deep for my liking!
faintthud.gif


With all the safety features and plans to make such helpers as featherboards and push sticks in your shop, I agree with Wally that probably 75% of the saw related accidents would be eliminated with a bit of concentration and common sense. "It'll never happen to me" has been the byline of many digit amputees over the years that I have been operating power tools.

I know too many people who buy a new saw and the first thing they do is remove the saw guard! That is just plain stupidity, in my opinion. They didn't put one on the saw because they had a couple of thousand extras lying around from the last "saw guard special" and decided to use them up!

My Delta Contractor's saw is equipped with a fold-out-of-the-way outfeed table, a quantity of different sized push sticks, and a number of different sized featherboards all of which I built in the shop. I have added a maple extension on my rip fence so there is little chance of the wood binding between the blade and the fence. All of these safety items can be bought from Woodworker's Supply or many other wood tool supply catalogs but you can easily find plans to build them also. They are easy to figure out and construct and will make operating the table saw safer and alot easier in some cases.

Framerguy
 

Cliff Wilson

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Wow, I could have used that when I was about 13! I was home alone after school and the parents hadn't gotten in yet. I decided to make a bow and arrow set. yeah, you heard right. It's tough making arrows with a table saw! The tip of my right middle finger is still kinda flat. Of course, being thirteen at the time I thought it was kinda fun to run around the neighborhood with my bandaged finger up in the air, but that's another story.

I'll stick to being careful. I'd rather that than pay more.
 

GUMBY GCF

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Most safey devices are designed by and for the weak, meak, and stupid careless people.

S#!T did I just say that?

Must be working too much these 14/7 days are starting to get to me already. They only started the week before Thanksgiving but only.
 

Ron Eggers

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In fairness, I didn't watch the video.

Having experienced the wrath of a table saw that wasn't getting my undivided attention (we never did find the rest of my hot dog,) I am skeptical of devices intended to protect us from ourselves.

I know people who don't use their seat belts 'cause they have airbags.
 

Mike Labbe

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I think Ron hit the nail on the head, so to speak


People are likely to be LESS careful because of such a device.

I saw that video and its amazing.

MIke
 
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