Rosco Deep Colors

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jul 4, 2000
Posts
332
Location
North Las Vegas, NV
Business
Retired, work from home shop
It seems that the Rosco brand deep color casein paint are no longer available, is there a recommend suitable substitute for these? I've occasionally used them for Dutch black finish and only need quarts size at most. Seems there are some gallon sizes of the Rosco out there but way too much product. Thanks -- John
 
I am lucky to have that product in stock.
The only alternative that I can see is to buy milk paint base powder and mix it with powdered pigment.
 
I am lucky to have that product in stock.
The only alternative that I can see is to buy milk paint base powder and mix it with powdered pigment.
I'm guessing you have it in stock for your own use, I have some drop black and umber that's been in the refrigerator for about 2 years! I've used General Finishes milk paint before and also see there are some milk paint that's offered as a powder -- is that what you'd suggest? I also use Ronan Japan colors but with my current shop set-up water based and rub-on shellac is a better fit. Always something to keep us on our toes ;-)
 
Thanks a lot, I'm leaning towards water based products although with my furniture work I always "poo-pooed" them -- is that a word!! In the 70's-80's the EPA started cracking down on solvent based finishes and the new formulations just weren't the same. I'll check out using the milk paints, I have some ideas for a frame so it'll be a fun journey. Thanks again -- John
 
Been there done that. My #1 gripe with polymer based products (acrylics) is that they do not dry rock hard. They have a gummy texture forever. Case in point, acrylic house paint.
 
We had a customer have us make some raw wood frames a few years back that he was painting with Milk Paint.
It was from his experiences that we learned that one should not use Milk Paint on Hardwood. Started flaking within a few months.
 
We had a customer have us make some raw wood frames a few years back that he was painting with Milk Paint.
It was from his experiences that we learned that one should not use Milk Paint on Hardwood. Started flaking within a few months.
As a gilder, all the surfaces are primed with RSG and covered with gesso first. Not an issue in my opinion.

Without gilding shellac can also be used as a priming seal coat.
 
We had a customer have us make some raw wood frames a few years back that he was painting with Milk Paint.
It was from his experiences that we learned that one should not use Milk Paint on Hardwood. Started flaking within a few months.
I've used General Finishes milk paint on Basswood without a problem but I always shellac all four sides first with BullsEye Seal Coat which is wax free.
 
BTW -- thanks again for that info about the Real Milk Paint. After checking it out, I bought a sample of the base coat and 16oz of black. Also got a product they call "chippy" which you splatter on the base coat. The top coat will come right off of it and you can create an interesting finish. Did a sample which showed me what not to do and will start on a complete frame soon. Plan to do a blog on it if (fingers crossed) it comes out the way my artist/wife would like.
 
John, I'll be very interested to know how your experiments with the milk paint come out. My shop is in the same boat with Rosco casein off the market. We still have some open cans on hand, but I'd like to have a plan for when it inevitably either runs out or goes off.
 
Hi S. Martin -- just came across this and not sure if you saw the results of my milk paint experiment. Here's a link to one of them -- hope it works, technology and I don't always get along! I also posted another one in the framing showcase. Be curious to know what you think of the results. The other frame I used a soft white milk paint to create a different color to compliment the palatte of the painting.
 
Hey John,
You might be able to find the hue you are looking for at Sinopia, here is a link to their milk paints. Good information on the product and application.
Sinopia Milk Paint
Best,
Horizon Line
 
Hi John, thanks for bringing this to my attention. We haven't had a chance to experiment with milk paint yet, but it certainly looks like you're getting a good result. I've been impressed by the Real Milk Paint Co. line of soft finishing waxes, they're easy to work with and low/no VOCs. They seem like a solid company.
 
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