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Roasted Oak

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Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Jul 4, 2000
Messages
289
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I recently completed a floater style frame using a material I'd like to share with you! Roasted Oak is lumber that has been placed in a kiln for an extended period of time and essentially, what happens is that the sap and sugar caramelizes and the entire piece becomes a dark, chocolate brown. I've ebonized Oak and that only colors a very thin layer but this goes throughout the board. This process can be done with other species of wood as well, I've used Poplar in the past and understand Maple is also treated this way (smells like maple syrup when cut).
Here are some pictures and a link to the blog I wrote about it: Roasted Oak Floater Frame http://woodworksbyjohn.com/2021/03/01/__trashed/
Something to note if you try it for your work, I was told that you need a polyurethane glue so used Gorilla Glue which I did. I wet sand the finish with the same oil I use for my furniture work and the slurry is dark and could potentially affect any contrasting woods you may have on your frame. Sometimes I'll add a splined key to the corners of the frame for strength and contrast. The way I make my floater frames isn't a simple L-shaped molding but you can see that in my blog.

In any case, if you make your own frames and someone needs a black material with character, Roasted Oak may be just what you need! The painting is by Diane Eugster and the size is 24" x 30". Keeping it Real by Diane Eugster (1).jpeg Roasted Oak.jpeg Corner Detail.jpeg
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Apr 8, 2003
Messages
9,036
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
Nice. My first thought when I read the title is that it would pair well with a nice Chardonnay.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Apr 8, 2003
Messages
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
BTW, whining aside (I wanted to using wineing but it isn't a word), that is some nice work.
 

wpfay

Comfort Badger
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OK. so now I have to put a kiln on the wish list. I suppose I could rent it out to potters when I'm not roasting wood.

How does it affect the density of the wood?
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Apr 8, 2003
Messages
9,036
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
OK. so now I have to put a kiln on the wish list. I suppose I could rent it out to potters when I'm not roasting wood.

How does it affect the density of the wood?
Nice try but a kiln for wood and one for arteests are different animals. Kilning wood is like BBQ; you do it low and slow. A typical temp for a wood kiln is 120 degrees. An average kiln time is 5-6 weeks depending on the moisture content of the wood. It can be longer or shorter. Zillions of sites and videos out there on this. Can be done on the cheap.
 

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Thread starter
Joined
Jul 4, 2000
Messages
289
Location
Phoenix, AZ
OK. so now I have to put a kiln on the wish list. I suppose I could rent it out to potters when I'm not roasting wood.

How does it affect the density of the wood?
No effect that I notice, the guy at the lumber yard mentioned that it seems very stable which makes sense since it's been in the kiln for a long time and all of the moisture is gone. Probably lots of information out there on the web. Wood is still pretty heavy but planes and works well with hand tools.
 
Airpag Corner, packing solution for frame shipping

Nikodeumus

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
1,135
Location
Comox, BC, Canada
I just read your Roasted Oak blog post.
Your solution for float mounting stretched canvas is clever, and much more versatile than the relatively limited options for pre-formed frames most of us have to use.
The photo with the wood shavings and hand plane looks like you're working with chocolate instead of wood!
I always enjoy seeing and reading about your creations John.
Thanks for sharing.
 

Woodworks by John

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Thread starter
Joined
Jul 4, 2000
Messages
289
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Appreciate the compliment, I think it makes for a much stronger frame this way since the corners are reinforced not only with a biscuit but also the plywood used for mounting. I drill a 1/4" hole through that which allows leeway to center the art exactly in the frame. I can also make as deep of a frame as the client wants. Hardest one is when the painting is on panel, then I glue an additional rim of plywood to the back of it so the mounting screw doesn't go through the art!! In any case, if you ever need a frame like these let me know. Shipping to Canada is probably a deal breaker but who knows? If you have the capability I'd be happy to share the technique with you -- let me know. Here's a picture of how the painting is mounted, I use gimlets for the starter holes; drills are way too fast!

Floater Frame Mounting.jpeg
 

Nikodeumus

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
1,135
Location
Comox, BC, Canada
Appreciate the compliment, I think it makes for a much stronger frame this way since the corners are reinforced not only with a biscuit but also the plywood used for mounting. I drill a 1/4" hole through that which allows leeway to center the art exactly in the frame. I can also make as deep of a frame as the client wants. Hardest one is when the painting is on panel, then I glue an additional rim of plywood to the back of it so the mounting screw doesn't go through the art!! In any case, if you ever need a frame like these let me know. Shipping to Canada is probably a deal breaker but who knows? If you have the capability I'd be happy to share the technique with you -- let me know. Here's a picture of how the painting is mounted, I use gimlets for the starter holes; drills are way too fast!

View attachment 37572
I don't have space for a real woodworking shop, I wish I did.
My father is a lifelong woodworker who, like you, makes a wide array of amazing wood projects and my grandfather before him was the same.
I guess that's why I enjoy seeing your creations so much.
I have done a few simple projects myself over the years, but nothing like what you or my dad can do.
I am going to pass on your Roasted Oak blog to my dad, he will definitely be interested.
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Joined
Apr 8, 2003
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Wilkes-Barre, PA
I use gimlets for the starter holes; drills are way too fast!
Not a problem with a variable speed clutched 12V drill. I drill pilot holes in thin mouldings with no issues.
 
Hoffmann Dovetail Joining System

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
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Apr 8, 2003
Messages
9,036
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Wilkes-Barre, PA

Matthew Hale

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Dec 5, 2015
Messages
577
Location
OHIO
Appreciate the compliment, I think it makes for a much stronger frame this way since the corners are reinforced not only with a biscuit but also the plywood used for mounting. I drill a 1/4" hole through that which allows leeway to center the art exactly in the frame. I can also make as deep of a frame as the client wants. Hardest one is when the painting is on panel, then I glue an additional rim of plywood to the back of it so the mounting screw doesn't go through the art!! In any case, if you ever need a frame like these let me know. Shipping to Canada is probably a deal breaker but who knows? If you have the capability I'd be happy to share the technique with you -- let me know. Here's a picture of how the painting is mounted, I use gimlets for the starter holes; drills are way too fast!

View attachment 37572
I always like to have a gimlet or 2 within easy reach. Yours appear to be made of steel; i typically like mine made with vodka...
 
High quality easel backs from craft inc
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