Question on KinKade Art...

Rock

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After reading all the archives about Thomas KinKade and him not being the most liked person to most people on the forum, is the main reason because of him ripping people off with high priced art(or whatever form it takes), his business practices, or not being allowed to sell his stuff in your gallery unless your a dealer? I've been told the minimum yearly quota for non-limited edition art that you have to sell is $2500 a year, and $7500 for the signature series dealer. Of course dealers can buy his stuff for 50% off retail, so they are making money if they could sell it but I would wonder if a small frame shop could sell that much in a year. Personally, I don't think I could sell that much and like what I do. Most of his items seem to be priced out of the park so to speak for no more than your getting. Anyway, not wanted to cause a stir, but I would appreciate a few comments on why not to do business with him. Thanks, from someone who doesn't know the facts :rolleyes:

Rock
 

fourcorners

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I have a problem with artists who put out additions of 10,000 + and sell them as "limited". I have a "limited edition" print (not a Kinkade) that I am framing for a customer at the moment that is numbered 10,626/50,000. I always feel bad for customers that bring a Kinkade to me to frame and they are so proud because they think that it's an original. I think that people should take the time to educate themselves before purchasing (and I certainly don't bring it up as I wouldn't want to offend my client) but I also fear that people may be being mislead. As if "limited" automatically means "rare" and "valuable". I admit, I haven't gone to a gallery to hear their side of the story so maybe I need to educate myself a bit too! :rolleyes: Any comments on my opinion?
 

johnny

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I agree with your fourcorners. We were Kinkade dealers very early on, before the large editions and duplicates. The first time they reissued a print under a different edition we said "Hey! Oh no you didn't!" But they did. And there was talk about maybe wanting a certain percentage of our wallspace dedicated to Kinkade somewhere along the line. We dumped them. It's something I occasionally reflect on, because if we would have kept it, man, we were in on the ground floor. I'd have a much bigger house today. However, I'd have given up a lot too, so all in all I'm glad we got out.

Strangely enough, Kinkades are going to be in some stores run by Saks. They are also going into a high profile mall around here. I can't believe they still sell so strong. It's kind of like putting a 2001 Ford Escort in your garage and calling over your friends so you can say "Look at that! What a beaut!"
 

Mecianne

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I just don't get it. Because of the many "limited" (isn't that an oxymoron?)editions, Kincades may have become ordinary. But to me, they have always looked ordinary. The Escort analogy says it all.
 

elsa

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Last summer I was driving to the grocery store-and there on a wide spot on the side of the road was a big white van. With framed pictures displayed around it--big signs

AUTHENTIC THOMAS KINCADES!!


I laughed my head off!!

Elsa
 

Baer Charlton

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Was that the guy in a very NASTY divorce thing?

I though he was over in Puyallup . . . ugly thing....

If he's the guy.... his wife sold his 2yr old Z3 Beamer for $900, sunk his 32' SeaRay off Vashon...after she had cancelled the insurance.

And there was something about his gun collection... :D

Nasty stuff going on with TK.
 

Rock

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Let me see now...that was limited editions that were not (gee, I could figure that out even though some customers couldn't) The man makes money, more money than I'm sure most of us make put together. Love him or hate him, he's laughing all the way to the bank. I don't much care for him personally, but I have to admit I like some of his paintings, not all but some. Not so much as to pay the enormous amount he asks for his copies, but my main question was why the majority of framers don't do business with him. From the responses I have read above, it comes down to his character verses the big bucks for "ordinary art". Like most people, I'm in business for the money. Some of the so called art other than KinKade's I have framed for people, a pet monkey could do better but it still sells to those who like it. Don't get me wrong here, I don't endorse Thomas KinKade or his practices. I just wanted some opinions. I got a few. Thanks.

Rock
 

JPete

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I had the impression that a few years ago he dropped many galleries in favor of kindade only galleries.
 

printmaker

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Originally posted by Rock:
... I would appreciate a few comments on why not to do business with him...
Time to rock the boat. :D

A reproduction is a reproduction is a reproduction.

Whether the "edition" is 10 or 100,000 ... whether it is an offset "print" or ink jet print (oops, "giclee" ;) ) it is still a copy, not a piece of art. And when photocopies are sold as "art", ethics go out the window every time (I won't argue this point as this, for me, is a 'black and white' issue).

His "unethical" business practices have been "practiced" by innumerable artists and publishers in the industry, so why is poor Tommy being singled out? There are many "top artists" who churn out, through various factories, "limited edition" high end "giclees" on canvas, sculptures and various knick knacks which are well marketed through branded "galleries". One could go on ad nauseum on this but, simply put, business, as they say, is business...

Over the past quarter century plus in this field, I've seen little that I would refer to as ethics in the commercial "art" world. Tommy, IMHO, is simply the poster boy for all this commercial crapola.

You may be well advised to seek legal coucil before bedding such a heavy weight but, if you don't have problems selling photo-copies (and why should you?), then why not?

Best of luck!

Oh, and by the way, quite truthfully, $7,500 in annual sales does not seem like an unreasonable minimum to me.
 

Rock

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Printmaker, yep, I believe everything you said. As far as the $7500 minimum from the way I understand it, that is the minimum order (at my discount)I would have to place every year for KinKade prints and you buy it up front the first year. If you don't buy $7500 from them every year, they take your dealership away. With that said, and not even concidering all the other reasons of not doing business with them, I don't think I should be forced to sell a minimum like that. You would think a buck is a buck whether I sell 1 or 100 every year for them. Either way, they would make money. So I don't understand their logic in that. I've ran another successful business for 23 year now, but my retail framing business for only 3 years, so I still have a lot to learn on who to deal with and who not to. From everything I have heard, I think I'll just leave it alone and let the so called KinKade Galleries have it all. Thanks for your reply.

Rock
 

Maryann

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There was a Kinkade booth was at the Atlanta Show last year. You could sign up as a dealer for a $500 order. Terms were 50/20. Not bad, we decided to give it a try.

Meanwhile, we were getting close to Christmas and placed anothe order for framed prints and another for nightlights with display. The nightlights did okay- they were inexpensive gift items for the lady next door or teacher, etc. We found that we couldn't give his prints away. He has oversaturated the market.

We ended up blowing the art out the door at 50% off and couldn't even sell some of it at that price. The balance of the nightlights went to ebay.

I love it when a big honkin' Kinkade print comes in the door for framing because usually money is no object, but no more wall space wasted on him.
 

Janet L

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My post is kinda off the topic here, but I have a customer that collects alot of abstract art. She recently married and they built a gorgeous, contemporary home. The pieces I have framed for her through the years really are beautiful in their new home.

Here's the hitch:

Her inlaws recently wanted to give them a housewarming gift. So...they presented them w/a Thomas Kinkaid copy of some print numbered at about a gazillion along w/a light to dim (LOL) and suggested they hang it over their stunning fireplace made of stone. My customer doesn't know what to do except frame the thing and hang it whenever the inlaws are coming to town. Only problem is that she's gotta figure out a way to bribe her kids to not tell the bestowers of this gift that the picture gets changed out a couple of times a year.
 

Ron Eggers

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Sounds like a variation on the old mother-in-law frame.

Some day, we'll have technology that will automatically sense in-laws approaching the front door and project a holographic image of acceptable art and photos on the wall and above the fireplace.

I wonder if Peter Ackerman would be interested in that idea.
 

Donna at MetroAF

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Originally posted by printmaker:
A reproduction is a reproduction is a reproduction.

Whether the "edition" is 10 or 100,000 ... whether it is an offset "print" or ink jet print (oops, "giclee" ;) ) it is still a copy, not a piece of art. And when photocopies are sold as "art", ethics go out the window every time (I won't argue this point as this, for me, is a 'black and white' issue).
I'm sorry, I don't generally like to rant like this, and I am usually not touchy about these things, but this one steams me every time.

Just because it's a reproduction, that doesn't mean it's not art. The art is the image, the piece. Art is a broad term. You can't expect to look at an open edition of the Mona Lisa and say "that's not art". It is not the printing process that makes the piece.

Now, trying to sell a piece as a limited edition when its not, that's unethical. I can't tell you how many people bring in 'LE' Doolittles they bought off eBay that were just photocopies of book pages.trying to sell a reproduced 'orignal' oil is unethical (Decor just had a Q & A on this one too).

Re-releasing a sold-out image in a new edition is ridiculous. Kouba is about to lose a lot of collectors because the new publisher is relesing a 'new' Darkhouse Spearing print. Same image, large size. That's unethical (and just dumb).

Gigantic editions sizes do make it harder for me to call a piece limited, but somehow Doolittle manages to sell out and go up in value.

My clients know they are not buying an original. I work in a mall, the market would not support me trying to sell just orignals. But they also KNOW they are buying a piece they love and enjoy. That is what makes it art. NOT how it is printed.
 

Bob Doyle

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Originally posted by Janet L:
... hang it whenever the inlaws are coming to town. ....
We kind of covered this with the Plasma HDTV big screen thread! They could get one of those TV "things" that hold s the TV "out of sight" in the ceiling.

Less expensive might be to tell her in-laws that the Framer (this ploy of involving a third party gets your freind of the hook!) mentioned that the heat variations and changed could really cause some serious damage to artwork hung over it. That to protet their really valuable pieces they should store them in archival boxes, and this way they can let their future generations enjoy them! And at their full appreciated value.


Then they can box the piece of crap up and stick the box in their humidity controlled attic!
 

fourcorners

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I like your points, Donna. In the end it all gets down to whether you like the artwork or not. If you love the image, original or not, and it's worth the money to you, buy it for Pete's sake! God knows everything in my house is not an original.
Rock, lots of varying opinions here on TK and his counterparts. To me, it just gets down to what you're in business for. If it's just money, do what you gotta do! Me? Mine is a lifestyle choice. I love framing and by having my own business I have the flexibility to arrange my schedule so my 3-year-old doesn't have to go to day care. Getting the occasional paycheck doesn't hurt either. :cool:
 

treeves

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I've been a TK dealer for about 7 or so years. The old Media Arts folks were a pain in the neck, and caused us a lot of grief. Thomas Kinkade bought the company out last year, and its my understanding that he is the sole owner.

Media arts, a publicly owned company listed as MDA on the New York Stock Exchange, had contract with TK for a print a month, or something to that effect. TK was the largest shareholder I'm sure, but did not have total control of the company. We tend to sell his pics in spurts, go for weeks, and not sell one, then last week we sell 6.

As for price, his print cost is much the same as everyone else. 24x36 S/N print wholesales for about 110. I usually frame it up double mat with a name plate and retail it for 495.-

The new folks have been very nice and easy to work with, I have had no problem and they have not required any yearly amount for me to buy. This may be something new, as most companies require a min opening order, but have not required me to buy so much each year in order to remain a dealer. Email for more info if needed.
 

briank

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Originally posted by printmaker:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Rock:
... I would appreciate a few comments on why not to do business with him...
Time to rock the boat. :D

A reproduction is a reproduction is a reproduction. Whether the "edition" is 10 or 100,000 ... whether it is an offset "print" or ink jet print (oops, "giclee" ;)it is still a copy, not a piece of art.


</font>[/QUOTE]So a photograph isn't art (just the negative is the art I guess)? A stone lithograph isn't art? A monoprint isn't art(it is just a copy after all)? What about digital art? You have to print it somehow. Artisticaly you are correct in the sence that the image is the same regarless of how many images there are (and maybe that's the point you were trying to make) but there is a huge difference in 10 insted of 10,000 images. Most likely in a short one time run of prints the artist will oversee the printing or do the printing themselves (ART IS IN THE CREATION AFTER ALL). Make adjustments and at times actual touchups on the art. But on a run of thousands the artist probably won't even look at them except the first few off the press. Futhermore, someone tell me how someone personaly signs an edition of 50,000! I find it shortsighted to blanket prints as non-art.

My 2 cents. Take them or leave them.
 

Greg Gomon

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It has been over a year since the last Kincaid came through our doors for re-framing. Ever take a Kincaid apart. It's a joke! 1st, the frame is imported from Mexico. Blemishes easily and of poor quality. Second, there is a "limited edition" sticker or plaque on every component. The stretcher bar has a plaque, the frame has a plaque, the giclee has a plaque. It may be a limited edition and "enhanced by hand" but NOT from Thomas himself. rather some unknown minion in his factory. When I use the term "Factory" I'm being generous.

I definitely think his impact is waining. There were 5 Kincaid galleries in our area just 3 years ago. Now there is only one tiny gallery located on a side street. Unfortunately, when his bubble bursts, he will be sitting on a yacht and his "collectors" will be sitting on poster art.

Just my opinion!!!
 

CharlesL

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So...when a customer comes in your extremely prosperous shop with a Kinkaid, and money to spend, you give 'em the bum's rush, telling them, "This is crap! I can't believe you BOUGHT this in the first place! You wouldn't know 'art' if it hit you in the head! I'm not going to frame this..this CRAP! I don't care HOW much you're willing to pay! Take this junk to Michaels!"

Somehow I doubt many framers have refused to get paid to frame a Kinkaid because the framer doesn't consider it 'art'. I don't believe, either, that pointing out that they have print #5,000,000 is advantageous, nor does anyone any good.

Framers frame...Customers buy stuff they like, and pay them to frame. If the customer wants dogs playing poker framed, and they're happy with the work, I say do a good job and get paid. Both of you will feel better.

I don't agree with some of the things Kinkaid does, in the name of 'art', but if I didn't pay my hard-earned bucks for it, and it is brought to me, as a framer, I'd be an idiot to denegrate what the customer likes and is willing to PAY me to frame. Wonder how many TK's Bob Carter's turned down because it wasn't 'art' in the framers eye?
 

Dave

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A signed LE print in a small limited edition (10-250?) printed in the traditional lithographic method is indeed an original piece of art. Each print is unique and the printing process itself, especially when film and plates are not the color separation method, is an art unto itself.

Limited edition block prints, etchings, stone lithographs, seriagraphs, photographs, etc. are all unique art images when the process is at least totally overseen by the artist if not actually printed by the artist and apprentices. They have a high potential of escalating in value and their collectability to an educated consumer is high.

The problem comes in when digital processes are used and the artist is completely or almost completely removed from the printing process. The editions are high and quite uniform. An uneducated consumer is falling prey to the marketing hype and pays high dollar for what is basically an open edition print. They buy into seudo myths such as a low number print being better than a higher number print. It is only "better" because of the ignorance of consumers placing a higher value on it and being willing to pay more for a low numbered print. In the case of a giclee or regular lithograph, the quality of the printing is generally consistent throughout the edition and an artist proofs are just prints designated as artist proofs and usually the artist isn't even there at the printing.

In a true traditionally printed small limited edition the artist oversees the entire printing process and the artist's proofs are those which are first printed and approved by the artist as acceptable. The middle of the edition produces generally better quality prints as a rhythm developes in the printing and any burrs or abberations in the plate smooth out. The higher number in a larger (say, over 100) edition are generally not as good quality as the plate begins to show signs of wear and the prints lose their crispness.

Thomas Kincaide and others who put out ridiculously large "limited edition" or "second edition" prints are modern day P. T. Barnum's.

Dave Makielski
 

fourcorners

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Does anyone out there really have the requirement that something be "art" in order to frame it? I framed the rear feathers of a turkey once. Was that art? No, it was something that a guy was proud that he shot. The Makita drill hanging in the CEO's office that has withstood years of abuse (including falling off the top of a moving RV) that STILL works? Is that art? My BA diploma? Very nice looking. Not art. My point. I'll frame ANYTHING! You got money? You want it framed? I'll frame it with a smile! TK's and all!
thumbsup.gif
 

Donna at MetroAF

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Originally posted by fourcorners:
Does anyone out there really have the requirement that something be "art" in order to frame it?
Exactly. We framed a sex toy once, NOT art in any way. Hilarious, but not art. I framed my wedding photo, awesome for me, still not art. We currently have a shark jaw bone and a fossilized fish framed. Again, very cool, not art.

We don't turn anyone down (unless they are really rude/obnoxious). It would not only cramp our style, but the style of our extremely creative clients. Let 'em frame what they want to frame. If they like it, that's all that matters. Art or not.

I don't particularly care for certain types of paintings, but I still put my all into it because that's what they want. I never want to see one of my frames come back because I didn't put any effort into designing the best layout possible. As a framer, that's how I work.

As someone who also works at a gallery, I do tend to promote the art that I appreciate, but I won't turn down someone because they want something I don't like. That would be dumb. I would loose my credibility as a salesperson, and in the end loose business.
 

briank

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Fourcorners,
Do you concider yourself and Artisan or a laborer? In essesence isn't the creative process we use to create a frame design "art"? Did you just throw the feathers on to a backing and stick a frame around them? I doubt it. I bet the person that created the crest for your school felt that he was creating something artistic. Personaly I hate Kinkades work. I think it is worthless (and I'm being nice here). I would put the most lavish framing on it if it came into my shop though. In that we are in complete agreement. I don't even know why I am responding to this post.

I am just having a bad day and needed a good rant!
 

Steven6095

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Donna.........I dont think I have ever seen those words used together before on the Grumble ;) You have to explain.....how did you mount it anyway!!!lol

2 Cents on the print / art thing:
Where is the line drawn between "decorative" and "collectable / valuable" art? The general public does not see that line. Pretty picture = good art / investment.
For me personally it all comes down to edition size. 2-100 or so, the supply and demand takes over and it could have a tangable "collectors" value.
Edition of 50,000 - for it to be worth anything (speaking secondary market here) you have to find 50,001 people who want it.
Beanie babies are the perfect example of what is going to happen to TK.
They were cute, some were rare. People sunk way too much money in them, then they realized - oh wait a minute: there are millions of things things and they are not made of gold.. Now they are worth $5 or less as a cute stuffed animal. 5 - 10 years from now, those TKs may have value - whatever someone will want to pay for the image.

I make a difference between someone buying a PRINT and someone buying an IMAGE. Alot of these TK buyers are buying the image. People like his work for that reason.

Frankly, I consider a signed limited edition print (actually printed from a machine of some sort) nothing but a poster. Buy a poster and get the same image.

The medium of that image and how many of that image are printed - that does not matter to a lot of so called collectors.

Now I collect prints. I collect Robert Taylor, John Shaw, etc. I have paid a lot of money for some of them. They are printed on a machine, but the difference is that they are always signed by someone who relates to the image.
Just paid a pretty penny for a John Shaw print signed by 32 of the Wake Island defenders during the war. That is not something that can be reproduced. To me the print is the image and the signatures. Without the signatures it is a poster.
 

fourcorners

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briank,
I think you and I are in complete agreement on more than you think. I am an artisan. I definitely think the frame I created for the turkey's backside
is a work of art. The guy who shot the turkey does not consider the turkey's rear "art" so I'm not gonna. He did not create it. He killed it. But the creation element is a whole new thread for a different website!
My point is not to argue what is art and what is not -- as I too have an exteeeemely wide opinion on what constitues "art". And besides, someone started a whole new thread for that argument. I'm just saying that I'll frame anything. It doesn't need a label -- it just needs to come with some form of payment.


Sorry you're having a bad day. From what I read on your post, it sounds like we'd get along just fine. And since we're so close geographically... let's meet in Vacaville for a cuppa coffee!
kaffeetrinker_2.gif
 

briank

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Fourcorners,
My uncle is looking at buying a Gallery/Frameshop in the Sacramento area actualy. Have many relatives in West Sac also. Where's your shop at? I might just come in and pick your brains on my Uncles possible venture in your area.
 

fourcorners

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We are in Folsom -- about 15 miles East of Sacramento on Hwy 50. Is your uncle rich? Does he want to pay more than the business is worth? How soon can he be here? Kidding...

I'm going to be in SF next month for the gift show. Maybe I'll hunt you down first!

Now, look at that... we made friends!
 

fourcorners

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Yeah, I think Rick James was actually here for a while. "Electric Avenue" was always one of my favorites...

So, on to more important matters... (maybe we should take this off the air) What's your favorite restaurant in the city? Looking for good eats, great ambience and something... non-Chevy's.
 

Donna at MetroAF

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A little hot glue, and a lot of prayer. ;)

Actually, it holds up pretty well. I have a picture of it, and if anyone wants to see it. I can email the image, since I have no idea how to post pics here, nor do I think the majority of the Grumble want to see it... Might be a good Warped thing though.

[ 06-16-2005, 08:36 PM: Message edited by: Donna at MetroAF ]
 

JohnR

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I was told and can generally agree that prints made from an original painting are not art, but is a poster since the original painting is the art and prints are copies of it. If the artist destroyed the painting (who would do that?) along with the printing "plates" and negatives (or nowadays delete the image file), the prints can be called art because there is no single original as in conventional printmaking, where the piece the artist created the image on is just part of the printing process.

I have many so called limited edition prints. I enjoy the images of the art printed on them. I know they are not valuable and don't care if they are really art. I do own some original art, but it ain't that valuable either ;)

I thought it was interesting how much each reproduction costs to produce. In large editions (over 1,000 copies) the prints can cost around $1 each or even less. This is the print shop's fee and doesn't include the artists fees, publishers fees and such. This is one reason why artists/publishers print so many. For one thing, they never know if they're going to have a hot print that sells many copies. Generally, they never sell out. It costs about the same to print 100 prints as it does to print 1,000.
John
 

stud d

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I tend to go with Printmaker, I know where he comes from and why he feels the way he does. This has been discussed at length on other threads.

If I were to buy a print (like an etching) I have no problem paying for something an artist created and made by the artist body and mind (a piece made physically by the atist).

If I buy a print (machine made) I am willing to pay a few bucks. Why it is a poster with some one saying it is limited this or that. And with these I am willing to pay five ten maybe $15 for something I like. Why not more? It is machine done, and that is what I would pay for a machine to do the work-they are not artists and should not be confused. Why pay more than what a piece of paper is worth if all you are buying is paper and ink? Not something of value.
Patrick Leeland
 

Ron Eggers

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Why is a piece of paper with Brett Favre's signature on it worth so much more than one with MY signature on it?

Mine might even be better paper and I would use a light fast pen!

And I can PROMISE you that there aren't nearly as many of MY signatures flooding the marketplace.
 

Dave

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Edwardsburg, MI
Now with digital presses, such as the Indigo, you can print 100 copies of an edition of 1000. If you sell the first 100 quickly, you could then print another 250, etc, etc, etc.

The major cost in this type of printing, besides the printing equipment of course, is the cost of color separation. A color separation for a 24 X 36 original may cost around $ 500.00. After that, the printing is relatively cheap.

There is reason to pay more than the cost of the paper and ink when buying a poster. Besides the overhead of the printer, the publisher/publicist deserves to make a living. How about the artist that created the work? What about the dealer who sold it? I don't begrudge anyone for getting as much as they can for their talents and services. I don't think too badly of an artist putting out a "limited edition" of 15,000 prints except for the fact that they've sold their soul and their talents to the devil for the almighty dollar if they claim these to be "originals".

The sad thing is that people are willing to spend such large amounts without first educating themselves as to what they are purchasing and understanding the true value and fall prey to the "investability" claims.

The old song...

"If you want it, here it is. Come and get it.
But you better hurry cause it's going fast."

A Fool and His Money.

...very much applies to the marketing of these types of editions.


shrug.gif


Dave Makielski
 

Bogframe

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
May 8, 2000
Posts
2,823
From
Brooklyn, NY USA, Right Near Coney Island, The Bro
I'd put 'Ol Tom's work in the same class as Bob Ross, even if Kinkade doesn't have the same class as Bob did. What really burns my brisket is his audacity in calling himself "The Painter of Light". I seem to remember from my Art History 101 that JMW Turner was called The Painter of Light, and comparing Kinkade to Turner is like comparing a Chevy Chevette to a Rolls Royce! (or am I completely mistaken?) JMW Turner
 

Rock

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Thread starter
Joined
Jul 15, 2004
Posts
172
From
Frankfort, IN
Well, I don't know if your mistaken or not, but I have looked at JMW Turners art, and to tell you the truth, I like some of KinKades work much better. Maybe 100 years after Ol' Tom dies, his work will be more appreciated as Turners is now.(at least the originals) To you and many others, Turners art is more appealing. To others, maybe not. I seen on TV the other day of a 4 year old kid painting and his parents selling the stuff for thousands and thousands of dollars. Now that's nuts to me, but I'm sure the kids parents are very happy at this point. :cool:
 

Jack Cee

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Posts
666
From
Willows, CA
One thing about his art that you will have to admire is marketing. We have sold a lot of Kincade and Doolittle by seaching the secondary market for the products and usually obtaining the desired piece at a big discount. Marketing skills far outshine quality for both artists, take advantage of the disparity and quietly go to the bank.

Jack Cee
 

Candy

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 9, 2005
Posts
1,543
From
Holland, MI
About 5 years ago, an art gallery built a log cabin that was a replica of one of Kinkades paintings. It was built to be a gallery for Thomas Kinkade and that was all they sold there. This same couple opened up 2 other galleries and purchased one that was in a mall. Today, the log cabin is closed as well as the other 2. The only one still open is in the mall.

Just an observation......
 
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