permanent mount

seymour

Grumbler
Joined
Apr 13, 2003
Posts
29
From
toledo,ohio
Hi. I have a customer who wants to frame a oil on paper. I have previously hinge mounted the work. The client does not like that it is not totally adhered to backboard. She does not like the waves the paper makes. But, I have said that it can not be dry mounted, etc. etc. She is fine with me mounting it any way I can because it is her son's work, not going to be of monetary value. Is there some sort of spray or something I can use that will PERMANENTLY mount this pc without coming up at a later date. She does not want glass. It has to be a I hate these "tacky" situations!! thx. s.
 

wpfay

Comfort Badger
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14,852
From
Jacksonville Beach, FL USA
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Sunshine Frames
In a word...no.
Nor can we defy gravity.

I'm not sure of the chemistry, but there are all kinds of issues with the oil in oil paint (linseed), paper substrate, and any kind of "permanent" bond with a backing board.
You risk ruining the piece by attempting to mount it, and if you were to ruin it the perceived value would change quickly from sentimental to monetary.

That said, I have dry mounted oil on paper to gatorfoam with the artist watching me do it. Funny how the brush strokes get all flattened out and the cadmium red, which he promised was cured, squished out. Then there was the hour or so cleaning up the mess on the release board (waste of time, should have just thrown it away).
It was an experiment and the artist was in on it. The piece had since partially lifted, but the artist is good with that as part of the natural cycle of things. Don't know if Mom would have the same understanding about Jr's work.
 

preservator

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Posts
2,209
From
Wilmington, DE
Wally's experience should be enough to scare anyone off heat mounting oil paintings. Oil paing
will degrade paper and to be safe, the paper should be covered with some form of acrylic to
keep the paint away from the paper. You might
suggest that the paper be mounted, first, then
sized with acrylic and then be given to the
artist.

Hugh
 

RoboFramer

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Sometimes what the customer 'wants' is for you to do a botch job. What the customers's artwork NEEDS may be something s/he does not want. Ask her if this painting is protected by varnish. I bet it isn't, therefore it is open to the elements.

Maybe the paper is cockled because the medium is unsuitable for the support, whatever, this is one of those jobs I would be happy to refuse, as long as the customer knows I am refusing because I am being asked to do something unprofessional.

You don't take an old banger to a Rolls Royce garage and ask them to turn the milometer back a few thousand for you. Be a Rolls Royce framer, not a 'Joe's' garage!

(No offence to anyone trading under the name of 'Joe's'!)
 

Jeff Rodier

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Posts
19,217
From
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Try giving the cutomer a small scrap of 8 ply rag for the child to paint a practice piece on and see if the surface is acceptable to the artist. Should the surface be acceptable, this would greatly reduce the buckling.
 

Jeff Rodier

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Posts
19,217
From
Myrtle Beach, S.C.
Originally posted by Jeff Rodier:
Try giving the customer a small scrap of 8 ply rag for the child to paint a practice piece on and see if the surface is acceptable to the artist. Should the surface be acceptable, this would greatly reduce the buckling.
 

Baer Charlton

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Joined
May 24, 2004
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On FB
and if the "child" is a 26 year old "art student" who knows everything?

As I read it, I was thinking along the same lines as Hugh. Offer to mount the stupic paper first.

But of course, then there is the little bit that the student was never told, or didn't listen.

Oil on paper is ment to be fugitive. The substrait can not be "restored" and therefore is "Wasting" art. It will continue to "transition" even when mounted.

Good luck.
 
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