Paste or tape??

T

trapper

Guest
They teach us about using paste at the college but quickly preferance it with Spendy and messy. Was recently told that their is no such thing as acid free tape..only told that so the artist will buy it..I don't believe that personally.
ANyhow what I believe doesn't really matter.
Would like to know your preferences, Tape or paste?
 
There are certainly acid-free tapes out there, but that doesn't mean they are suitable for conservation framing. Most will leave a residue that is never completely reversible.

If you come away from The Grumble with only one very big concept, maybe it should be this: "Acid-free" is a largely meaningless and over-used term in the world of conservation framing.

(Another largely meaningless and over-used term is "conservation framing.")

If you're looking for a legitimate shortcut, check out Nori paste by FrameTek. There's a demo on their website and it's the real deal.
 
In addition to what Ron said, please remember that
paste, once it is dry, will maintain its hold and
will change very little. Pressure-sensitive tapes
will fail if stressed and will change as they age.


Hugh
 
I for one don't think that pressure sensitive tape will hold forever. But I have never ever seen them fail. Paste is messy. I may be wrong but up here our museums use tape and properly hinge the art into the mats. A job was brought in awhile ago that was dbl. matted with ATG tape.They wanted me to seperate the two mats and I got to tell ya it was not that easy.
If I could have just torn it apart or used a knife to break them apart without too much concern for tears it would have been pretty straight forward, but they wanted it seperated as if they had never been taped ( glued ) together in the first place. )
 
Originally posted by trapper:
I may be wrong but up here our museums use tape and properly hinge the art into the mats.
If they are using tapes with pre applied adhesives, they are doing something that is not done by most of the other museums around the world.
 
Tape gets between the teeth and is a dickens to get out, as where Nori is nice with a little soy sauce and Ebi on top. :D

ATG the paper on the back but hinge with paste.

Or if you are doing the anal job, paste the 2-ply rag to the back for a dust cover. Or just do it like Hugh and use Linen Tape.
 
trapper;
Sue posted'"All depends on what the use is. Paste or tape what?"
And then several people replied to whatIMHO was replies aimed at the ART work and then you followe with;
"A job was brought in awhile ago that was dbl. matted with ATG tape.They wanted me to seperate the two mats and I got to tell ya it was not that easy."
I think there just might be a large differance between what is used BETWEEN mats and what is used on their outside.
However I guess if you were a TRUE PUREST there may be no place for ATG but when it is sandwiched between two good mats ,far away from any other contact I can't see the problem.

But I think this has been discussed already on TFg and THERE IS Acid Free ATG but it doesn't hold too well.

But I am neither a PUREST nor as knowlegable as most . But more info might help Dumbies like me.
BUDDY
 
Paste need not be "messy" if it is applied in
micro or macro dots. For more info: pictureframingmagazine.com, articles index, preservation supplements, hinging.


Hugh
 
Originally posted by trapper: I for one don't think that pressure sensitive tape will hold forever. But I have never ever seen them fail. Paste is messy. I may be wrong but up here our museums use tape and properly hinge the art into the mats.

I think if you search the old memory banks you will be able to come up with examples were tape has failed. Think old masking tape, Scotch tape, packing tape etc. its just a question of time. Unless you are vewy vewy young, you'll have seen it.


As was mentioned earlier, knowledgeable museum employees don't use tape to hinge things, and wheat starch paste or methylcellulose adhesives need not be messy. Hugh's microdot method is one example; I also believe Frametek has an online demo of how to paste hinge neatly. Practice makes perfect, but honestly it is not hard and demonstrates best practices. Next time you come south I'd be happy to show you how easy it is.


Rebecca
 
The jury is still out for me on paste or tape. Not young ( wished I were ) Life was so much simpler when I was naive. I have yet to see a properly taped piece fail..even after many years. Not sayiing they wont, just saying I haven't yet seen this.
Of course I am not talking about masking tape or even scotch tape.
 
Yes, irreversibility can be quite a problem with some "archival" tapes, as can migration of oily plasticisers into the paper substrate.

http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byorg/abbey/an/an23/an23-4/an23-409.html

http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byform/mailing-lists/cdl/1999/0333.html

You can do your own search on Conservation on Line

http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/search.html

scroll to the bottom of the page for the search function. Since you're interested in conservation subjects you might have fun poking around the site. I always enjoy it anyway.

Rebecca
 
Where does Philmoplast come into the mix???
 
I believe that the reason framers don't see a lot of failures of their own framing misteaks is that:
1. Folks in the U.S. move on average of every 5 years

2. When they move is the most likely time for hinge failure. (Turn the average frame sideways and the art swings down and "peels" the primary [top] hinges.)

3. They may take the failure to another frame shop to be repaired. (Like in their new town).

Check out the new hinging instructions on the FrameTek web pages under the pull-down menu titled "Free Info". Not well written but full of good information.
 
Elaine,

Use the bottom URL that is in Rebecca's post and type in "Filmoplast P90 tape" and you will find 3 pages of information and replies to questions like you asked. I used the Google scholar search engine for this search.

Framerguy
 
I have much better luck using organic solvents when removing filmoplast tapes. The problem with water removal is that the paper of the art is often not strong enough to withstand all of the mechanical action necessary for wet removal.

And sometimes the tape simply can't be removed at all. Maybe because it's been burnished in place, maybe because of aging and crosslinking, and maybe - who knows, one of life's little mysteries.
shrug.gif


Rebecca
 
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