padding for needlework

B. Newman

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So, I thought if I use this "topic" the next time someone does a search on this subject at least something would come up!

I searched under every type of wording I could think of, and still came up with nothing. I know it has been discussed, but I can't for the life of me find it.

Years and years ago, we used foam, and I know that isn't acceptable now, but was it cotton batting that was mentioned to be used? If not, just what is it?

Betty
 

Bill Henry-

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I use cotton batting, too, although I kinda miss the ease of use of the yellow foam.

I'll bet Ron uses powdered Coroplast. :D
 

FramerDave

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Betty,

I'm sure it's been discussed here, and there was a discussion about it on HH recently.

Cotton batting is far and away better than that nasty old foam that used to be used, but cotton has its own drawbacks. It can really hold moisture, and has a tendency to sort of bunch up over the years and start to look lumpy. Heat-bonded polyester is the batting of choice now, as it's inert and doesn't clump. I don't know all the details, but apparently the stuff has to be bonded into a sheet form, and it can be done with chemicals or heat. And of course we want to avoid adding any chemicals or unknowns into the framing package, so that's why the heat-bonded.

Rebecca also told me that she likes 3M Thinsulate as batting.

To bat or not to bat is another of framing's mini-controversies. One camp says you have to bat every piece of needle art, the others says you don't. IMHO, use batting if there are knots or lumps in the piece, or if the customer just likes the look of it. Otherwise, don't.

And don't even get me started on glass vs. no glass.
 

B. Newman

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I do remember reading about it on HH, but couldn't find any of those either!

Just where does one buy this heat bonded polyester?

Betty
 

Kit

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Betty, buy it at the fabric store.

It's polyester quilt batting and comes in various thicknesses. Get the thinnest available and double it if necessary.

I agree with Dave about padding needle art: sometimes you just have to have something to even out the lumps and puckers. If the piece doesn't need it, I don't use it.

Polyester quilt batt has other uses around the frame shop. It can add dimension to flat articles of clothing; baby bonnets, for instance.

And on slow days, you can fold it up and use it as a pillow.

Kit
 

Rozmataz

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Betty -

Before I even opened my doors 2 years ago, one of my best friends had alot of needlework she wanted framed... so my list of "to buy" items was the "batting" and what I bought has never been opened or used...

I would be happy to send it to you if you are interested.

Let me know.

Roz
 

B. Newman

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Thanks Roz. The gal that works for me just told me that her mother has some from a quilting project.

It'll probably end up being like Mylar - once I use it, I'll find all kinds of uses for it.

And I especially like the pillow idea
sleep.gif
!

betty
 

BUDDY

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This is hit # 6 of 10 records in your search for Polyfil Batting <<< | Previous Message | Next Message | >>> Go to hit

6 : Message # 40672
Date: 2/4/2004, 10:57:03 AM
From: BUDDY3453@aol.com
Subject: Re: polyfil vs cotton batting

Susan ,I may be mistaken but i think you are confusing Polyfil
(Synthetic Fiber batting )for the Poly Foam ( a synthetic foam padding
that comes in sheet form and in flakes.
The later is a synthetic sort of foam rubber that gets yellow and
brittle over time and tends to crumble and loose it's texture .In fact
if my memory serves me Polyfil was what Quilters went to to remedy the
problem that Cotton had(Compacting with time caueing unsightly clumps).
I may have the names wrong but the product we use and i think is
recommended as both inert and nondegradeable is a spun fiber batting
made from Poly - fiber material some what like cotton not like foam
rubber.

This was my reply to the HH thread on that topic if it's any help.
BUDDY
 

wally pasbrig

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To bat or not to bat. I frame plenty of cross stitch pieces and do use a thin quilt batting under the piece. I think it gives a little "lift" to the piece. Then I make sure that I use spacers to keep the uplifted piece away from the glass. I will generally use glass. I have too many of my own pieces that had no glass and really got dirty over the years. I also noticed that people have a tendency to touch the piece if there is not glass.

Wally
 

B. Newman

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Polyfil - that's the word I wasn't using! No wonder I couldn't find anything. Thanks to all.

I don't normally pad these thing either, but I needed to match one that a customer had done somewhere else.

She said "could you?" and I said "sure, whatever you want." And then proceeded to find out how!

Betty
 

BUDDY

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In a further reply I commented that paddding is normally used when there are knots or clumps of thread on the reverse side of the work. This Allows the problem areas to sink into the batting and not cause any unsightly pimples on the surface.
To this reply I was curtly informed that good Crosstsitchers "Don't make knots".To which I explained that I frame for all types of stitchers and some who think their work is just grand do indeed make an occasional knot.
I was also informed that the "LIFT" that padding caused made an "Unsightly " apperanace on the surface of the work and therefore batting shouldn't be used ( I have never seen this taught in any needle art text). To this I reply "I don't judge the taste of clients ,I just do my best to make it look as nice as I can while meeting their spesifications."
Batting ,Matting and Glazeing are all used by me and suggested as the piece warrants but the customer makes the decisions.
The only time I strongly suggest useing Batting and NO glass is when the work is intended to hang in a young child( mostly boys) room. They often throw things about and might cause the work to fall and broken glass can cut little fingers ( even pointed acrylic can do some harm)
BUDDY
 

JPete

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I have used polyester fleece for years. It has just enough umf (sp) to absorb the knots etc. but not too thick. It also comes with the iron on adhesive and called pellon. Both are used for interfacing when making clothing. Adhesive back is not my preferred and cost more. I used to buy it by the bolt from a craft supplier but now by the yard, 60" wide and about $3.

I only cut this to the size of the mat opening, it lets the mat sit nicely and doesn't stick out. Works with or without glass. Like Buddy, I do as the customer wants, most of the time.
icon45.gif
 

gemsmom

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For the occasional customer who doesn't want glass, I suggest batting. I don't like glass on needlepoint or crewel (unless the customer wants it), so those w/o glass are padded. Sometimes a customer wants her work matted. I found that by putting one layer of batting under the needlework lifts it just enough to eliminate the space created between the mat and the needlework.
 

B. Newman

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Originally posted by Pamela DeSimone, CPF:
I found that by putting one layer of batting under the needlework lifts it just enough to eliminate the space created between the mat and the needlework.
By this, do you mean you only put the batting under the mat opening part of the needlework, (like JPete) or do you put it under the entire piece of needlework?

Betty
 

gemsmom

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The entire piece. I cut the mounting board an inch or so larger and do what I call a buildup, others might call a sink mat, around that. I then ATG the mat to the buildup on all sides close to the needlework, but not touching it. I sometimes have to use more than one layer of whatever I'm using for the buildup to make it level with the mounted piece. Oh, yeah, I almost forgot, I place the entire mounted piece on top of a 4 ply mat board (large enough for the buildup). So what I have is 4 ply board (larger than finished piece-I trim it afterwards), needlework in center, buildup around that, mat(s) on top. I will sometimes put the package in the vacuum press for a minute or so to get a really good "stick" to the tape to help keep the mat from bowing. I have done this for years and never had "no glass" people (I've had some for years) bring something back because the mat didn't hold or bowed away from the art.

If someone has a needlepoint and wants glass, I like to use a liner, pad the needlepoint, and put the glass between the liner and frame. FYI, the cross-stitch I won a PPFA competition with a couple of years ago was done this way. I also padded the mat. Hm. Guess I like padding to the extreme.
 

Jim Miller

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Originally posted by Pamela DeSimone, CPF:
...I don't like glass on needlepoint or crewel...
When a customers says "I don't want glass", I repond with "...and you don't care if it's dirty & damaged in a few years, right?"

The glass-on-textile debate has been well flogged here; check the archives.

It boils down to personal preference. And that's fine, so long as we & our customers all understand that household air is dirty, that cleaning of framed textiles simply doesn't happen, and that the longevity of the textile is greatly reduced.
 

gemsmom

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I advise my customers as how to best protect their work, regardless of my preferences of how I like something to look. A few feel as I do-glass takes away from the look of some types of work. Heck, people use embroidered pieces to be walked on, sat on, sneezed into, and catch baby dribble. Even without glass, framed needlework will last forever compared to some of those things.

I don't understand the line "the cleaning of framed textiles doesn't happen". I have done this, cleaned and re-framed previously framed items. I have one in-house now. True antiques I would never touch, but some things are certainly do-able. You just have to know the difference.
 

BUDDY

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In an effort to reach a compromise between Jim and Pam ,I would like to submit the following.Needlework can (even abtiiques) be cleaned.That is exactly what Textile conservators make a living doing.
However unglazed needleart will not remain pristeen or even clean for that matter. And furthermore contuinual cleaning of the same will eventually have a wareing effect on the beauty of the work.
But as I have mentioned before ,Certified Needleart Instructors from Europe take a totally different view of the problem. They do indeed stitch pieces that are intened to be used as hand towels ,napkins, table clothes and even children's play clothes. Their approach is when the work becomes too soiled to continue to be used "YOU STITCH ANOTHER" unlike the Anerican needleworker who frames almost every thing ,THANK GOD.
BUDDY
 
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