Oversized glass question

stndrdprjcts

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Hello all,
I am relatively new to framing and doing my first oversized project, two vintage posters at 42x58". Initially, I thought the conservation clear glass would be fine but now I'm worried it will be too heavy. I've looked through the forum quite a bit but can't find a guideline for when to switch to acrylic. My glass supplier carries CC up to 48x68 so someone must be using it? Thoughts appreciated!
 

Scott Lewis

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It all depends on the frame, which should always be robust enough to support the contents. I’d use a frame and strainer arrangement and hang directly from d-rings with no wire. In a residential situation glass will be easier to live with. In a commercial situation, I’d opt for acrylic.
 

stndrdprjcts

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I plan to use a 1 3/8” wide Nielsen frame and hang with hook ups. It’s for someone’s home
 

wpfay

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I have handled only one piece of the 48" X 68" Tru Vue product, and that will be my last. I still have 1 lite of the Museum Glass in that size, and probably will until I close the shop.
I'm a bit conservative when it comes to switching to acrylic. Anything over 32" X 40" should be considered a candidate, and 36" X 48" is my tipping point. I no longer stock 40" X 60" glass.
 

Framing Goddess

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I have seen too many oversized pieces of glass break seemingly spontaneously along with near misses with employees. I also draw the line at 36" x 48" and have made a couple of exceptions for iffy reasons. Safety is a major concern of mine and in my opinion, oversized glass is a hazard. Also, it depends how long and strong your arms are.
 

framah

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I have 2 pieces in here now that need to have museum glass put into it.
The big one is 55.5 x 15!

I'm thinking it might be the last seriously oversized piece I want to put any glass into.


The only good thing is that it is only 15 inches wide....but still, it means I have to honk a 40x60 piece into the wall cutter.
 

Ylva

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Right now, I do cut (and stock) the 40x60 glass. I am strong with long arms....that helps. LOL

However, in a few years from now, I would probably no longer go up to 40x60 and might just go up to 36x48

I charge a lot as well, as it takes me much longer to handle it correctly. (including the courage build up to get it on my wall cutter)
 

stndrdprjcts

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Thanks for you insights everyone! I think I will go with acrylic. The customers priority is UV protection and it seems like the acrylic will be easier all around.
 

Joe B

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I will generally talk the customer out of any oversized glass installation. When the glass is that large of a piece the slightest flex can crack/break the glass into shards. Very dangerous and could be a liability issue in home or business IMO. I do try to sell the customer Acrylic because of the possible liability issues and weight differences but if the customer insists I will do what they ask me to do - release of liability statement will be signed though.
 

Ylva

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Thanks for you insights everyone! I think I will go with acrylic. The customers priority is UV protection and it seems like the acrylic will be easier all around.
It will be more expensive, but worth it at that size. Still cheaper than having to replace the glass over and over again.
 

Larry Peterson

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I shudder just thinking about glass that large. Acrylic all day long.
 

alacrity8

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I have handled only one piece of the 48" X 68" Tru Vue product, and that will be my last. I still have 1 lite of the Museum Glass in that size, and probably will until I close the shop.
We also had a single 48"x68" Museum project years back. I think the matted art was 24"x68" or so.
After a few years I cut the leftover piece down to usable sizes.
I'd be winning to do it again for something similar (teat only used half of the sheet) that they wanted Museum on, as I try to avoid Museum Plexi.
 

Shayla

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When using acrylic (and/or spacers) in a metal frame, we skip spring clips, as they put pressure on the glazing. Instead, we fill the back to depth with foam core.
 

Nikodeumus

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Clarification from Shayla and Ylva please?
Do you cut foam core strips to slide under the metal frame edges or do you cut entire extra layers fit to size?
I have used strips of matboard when not enough space for spring clips.
That got me wondering about just using foam core all around the edges for more uniform support.
 

Ylva

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I cut foam core strips, or matboard, depending on how much space there is. I either cut the full size (so if art is 10x12, I'd cut the strips to 10 inch. Sometimes, depending on space. Or if that doesn't work well for whatever reason, I would cut 2 x 5" pieces.
I hate spring clips with a vengeance. :)
 

Rick Granick

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Niko- that is my preferred method. For many projects a combination of 3/16 FC and 1 layer of matboard (similar to making shadowbox spacers) is ideal to fill the space.
You can make up a bunch of 1/2" wide strips of each and stick them together. Do this in batches using scrap strips leftover from cutting full sheets for projects. You can make up a batch of them during a slow period (if you have one) to have on hand for when a metal frame project comes up.
:cool: Rick
 

David Waldmann

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We just took an order for a custom profile - 1-1/4 x 3 with a 3/8 wide rabbet. Total of 38 frames, largest is 83 x 120. They want them cut with a 1/16" allowance. I guess that, as long as the acrylic is being cut at a "warmer-than-average" temp they'll probably be OK. But NOT MY
PROBLEM!
 

David Waldmann

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We just took an order for a custom profile - 1-1/4 x 3 with a 3/8 wide rabbet. Total of 38 frames, largest is 83 x 120. They want them cut with a 1/16" allowance. I guess that, as long as the acrylic is being cut at a "warmer-than-average" temp they'll probably be OK. But NOT MY
PROBLEM!
I did find out they're going in a hospital, so once installed they're probably be ok.

Also found out this is Phase 1 of 5...
 

wpfay

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Right, David. I built some shadowboxes for a marketing company to specs, but they never said the pieces would hang in the garage with no climate control. Results were predictable.
 

realhotglass

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OP is a few weeks old, but as a glass worker and long time frame shop supplier of numerous glazing products, I'd never glaze something that big with 2mm glass.
Those larger sheets (and larger sheets in general for other uses) are generally made for one reason . . . to give better economy in cutting, less waste, with the ability to cut more efficiently.

I do hate acrylic in anything external, apart from the optically coated low reflection, because that surface will resist scratching nearly as good as glass.
Normal acrylic (99% UV etc) will dull quite quickly and look awful, just by someone wiping it down now and then.

The coated acrylic is really pricey, but if people want big art . . .

I have supplied laminated glass to folk for really huge artwork.
The thinnest you can get is 4.38mm, but that is optically coated too and price wise really hard to bear, normally lam is available commercially up to 5.38mm.
A very heavy and well made frame is needed, as too hangman or keyhole type hanging system on top and bottom stiles.
 
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