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Old Saw or New Saw????

Jen Ward

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
4
Hi, Im new. I recently purchased a framing shop and am putting together my own shop. I bought at Frame Square miter saw from the previous owner. This saw takes up a lot of room in the shop due to leaving room for the molding so that I don't have to over cut and then cut to size. I was thinking of buying a Clearmount mitre scale and a mitre saw (probably the 10" Mikita saw that comes with it). Do you think this is a good option? Then I could put it against the wall and have plenty of room for full length molding cuts.

Please advise. Thanks!
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
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Apr 8, 2003
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8,450
Like getting rid of your Cadillac and replacing it with a VW Bug.
 

Jen Ward

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
4
Thanks for responding. So not a good idea...... Is the Clearmount Mitre scale and mitre saw not as accurate?
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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I guess I don’t understand completely what the issue is? Can you post photo?

I use a system like the clearmount and do like it. As long as you still use two saws with excellent blades. (Quinn saw for instance)

I have a designated saw room, so I can feed in the moulding easily for the first cut.
 

Jen Ward

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jul 14, 2020
Messages
4
I guess I don’t understand completely what the issue is? Can you post photo?

I use a system like the clearmount and do like it. As long as you still use two saws with excellent blades. (Quinn saw for instance)

I have a designated saw room, so I can feed in the moulding easily for the first cut.
I dont have photos. Im just trying to set up my new shop and the Frame Square model 1557 that I have is taking up a lot of room (I wanted to make sure that I could put in full length new molding in every direction). I only have a one room shop. 16ft x 32ft. I was thinking of getting rid of the Frame Square and getting the Clearmount with Mitre saw system. Then I could put it next to the wall and have plenty of room for a full length piece of molding. I just wanted to make sure that I wasnt making a mistake.

Also, when I googled Quinn saw, I didnt see a mitre saw, just the blades. Are you recommending those blades for better cuts?

Thanks for all your help.

Jen
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

Mike Labbe

Administrator
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Quinn has excellent quality blades for any saw.
 

Ylva

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Hi Jen,

Yes, Quinn is for blades only and they are excellent.

I don’t own a frame square saw but they are regarded as far more superior than the systems like Clearmount.

You only need the long space for the infeed of the moulding. My saw room is 24’ x barely 6’

I am not familiar with the Frame Square saw, so hope some people can pipe in on how it operates.
You usually don’t need the same space on both infeed and outfeed side.

In other words, when you have 8’ moulding, you would need the 8’ on either the infeed or the outfeed, but not both.
My outfeed is about 7’
My infeed is almost indefinite as that side of my saw room is open to the shop, separated by curtain which I can draw aside when needed.
 

wvframer

Humble Picture Framer
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Oct 9, 2007
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1,837
Welcome.

The blade is the most important component of a saw. Quinn Saw has excellent blades and service.

I agree with Larry: Frame Square is one of the most reliable and solid picture framing saws available. The company actually went out of business because they last forever and require very little maintenance or adjustment. The quality of their cuts exceeds what I can get on my Pistorius Double Overhead Mitre Saw.

Most of the parts that might fail are available off-the-shelf, and you can get other parts from aftermarket suppliers.

The Clearmount system is good and once set up and tweaked will take up much less space. But it is a step backward in terms of build quality.

Since you are new to framing, I think you should wait a while and use what you have until you are sure what will work best for you. How much volume you have might make a difference in how you set up your shop.
 

CHolt

True Grumbler
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
52
You will be much happier with a saw like the one you have. The inconvenience of stepping around it will be outweighed by the ease of assembly and quality you will achieve. I dont think I can emphasize that enough. A more lateral alternative would be to set a dedicated double miter framing saw parallel to one of the long walls in your space. The Frame Square is very very good but in my opinion a double miter saw is more versatile.
I would even recommend setting up a simple cutoff saw station with a saw like the Makita, but without the scale, and then precut the rails you intend to miter. Feeding full sticks through your miter saw isn't usually ideal. I would prefer an easier method to cut around defects, bows and twists in the middle of moulding sticks than with the Frame Square and the shorter stock will be more secure clamped up to Frame Square fence. Ease of assembly and quality again.
Good saw blades are important and so is keeping them clean. Carbide tips stay sharp for a very long time, but cut poorly when they're dirty. To clean a dirty saw blade soak it in detergent solution for about a half hour and scrub away the resin that's built up on the tips and in the gullets between the teeth with a brush until they shine.
 

framah

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Mar 15, 2001
Messages
8,811
To extend Greg's post... consider going with buying chop for now.
You may find that you don't need a saw...especially in that small a space.
 
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