newbie

Dr. A

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
14
Location
Ohio
Hi everyone. I am a newbie framer wannabee. I have a real stressful job and have always wanted to open my own shop. So what do you think I need to get the ball rolling?
 
Lots of band-aids.
party.gif


Hit the search button... there's lots of advise on starting your own business. Besides all the appropriate personality traits that it takes to start your own business.. you'll need training, equipment, suppliers, location-location-location, and some capital. Not to mention skills in working with your hands, your head, your heart, and your eyes.

It's a great profession. Good luck!
 
Estimate the amount of funding needed for your project and then apply a factor of 5. Most new businesses do not correctly anticipate the capital investment. Beware of underfunding.

Jack Cee
 
What kind of stressful job? Air traffic controller? Neurosurgeon? Rodeo clown? Mike Tyson's sparring partner?

Without the right temperament and preparation and plenty of capital, self-employment is probably more stressful than any of these jobs.

Use The Grumble as one part of your research but remember - 95% of the participants here are professional framers. Of course, they're going to tell you it's the only way to live.

(Then they'll turn around in the next post and complain about all the new competition.)
 
Originally posted by Ron Eggers:
What kind of stressful job? Air traffic controller? Neurosurgeon? Rodeo clown? Mike Tyson's sparring partner?

Without the right temperament and preparation and plenty of capital, self-employment is probably more stressful than any of these jobs.

Use The Grumble as one part of your research but remember - 95% of the participants here are professional framers. Of course, they're going to tell you it's the only way to live.

(Then they'll turn around in the next post and complain about all the new competition.)
 
Actually Ron you are pretty close. I am trained as a Neuroscientist with a PhD in Biomedical Science. My current job is the Health Commissioner and CEO of a very large public health agency with over 170 employees, not that you really care about that, but it is stressful. I owned my own manufacturing business for 17 years with a partner, so I am not new to business, but a newbie to custom framing. I appreciate any input the forum members might have. Thanks and best regards. Dr. A
 
Whatever you make now subtract 110% and then an extra 30% for the unexpected and this will give you what you can expect to make (lose) your first year or so.

I found out most of what I needed searching on the grumble and working in Mom and Pop and Chain framing shops. Take classes to get a better idea of what you will be doing before you spend any money to get a hands on feel of things.

It can be fun but stress rears its head at very enexpected times.

Don't get discouraged, it takes time but it is worth it (most of the time).

Welcome to the grumble.
 
Dr. A,
Your over qualified! Next. :D

Just kiddin, welcome to the G.
Now that we have a Dr. on board, you may be fielding questions about framers aches and pains.
 
Oh, I DO care.

Your background and experience will have a lot to do with your chances of success in a framing business.

People sometimes think that a background in art is the key to success in framing. That was probably more true 30 years ago.

You can hire people who are experienced framers. Be aware, though, that if you develop a larger framing business with multiple employees - possibly multiple locations - your actual hands-on framing may be minimal.

Ask Marc Bluestone or Bob Carter how much framing they themselves get to do each week.
 
JB, 110%. Wow you got off easy.


Doc, it hurts when I do this.... (sorry, I just had to.) :D

Seriously, if you have never worked in the framing biz before, you may want to try it part time in a local shop to see what it's all about. From the outside, it looks glamorous, easy, proffitable, and stress free. Well the reality is that; it is, or certainly can be. But it still isn't for everyone.

Welcome and good luck.

Harry
 
I have been interested in framing for sometime and live in a region where not a lot of services are available. Just thinking I could fill a niche and at the same time build a little side business. I need a distractor from my daily routine. Let's call it therapy!
 
Thanks for the tip Harry, but I don't believe any of the framers in my area would be to keen on me working in their operation and then going into business against them. I would have to find an alternative method. I have done some framing, but only for myself and pieces in my past business. I have thought about attending classes such as the American Academy, but I wish there was something closer to me.
 
1. Join the PPFA
2. Get hold of and read all that you can about framing (good source is PPFA).
3. Go to trade shows.
a. check out equipment and suppliers.
b. take educational courses.
4. Find some way of getting "hands-on" experience. There are schools.
5. You know the business drill. It applies here as well.
6. Since you are already in Ohio you can check out some of the more well known framers on the Grumble, have a nice tour of the state, and write it all off as business research.

(All Ohio Grumblers raise your hands).

Greetings Doc. Learning framing is a lot like learning to play Bridge. You can get the basics down in a few hours and spend the rest of you life perfecting it (only framing has more variables). Enjoy.
 
If you really want to be in this business, try to buy an existing one.

This has many advantages such as: Existing client base, existing experienced employees (assuming you need some), machinery already in place,etc.

And, make sure the sales contract stipulates that the seller will help you for a certain period (2 weeks full time, 2 months part time, for example).

That's how I got my business... ;)
Good luck.
 
Dr.A ... welcome ... I know where you're coming from! I had a "C" level position with a large corporation before embarking on a new life in the framing world ... and I'm having a great time ... although at times I sure miss the $ that went with the old life! My advice is much the same as stated above, but I would emphasize the need to spend plenty of time learning the science, craft, artform, products, services, and players within our industry. The pure business side is not much different than running any other operation ... adequate capital, a solid marketing program, a good QA program, and attention to all the operational details. One of the best things about this "job" is that there are always fresh problems to solve ... you are always learning ... and when you apply this knowledge, produce an exquisite product, and delight your customer, their pleasure in your handiwork goes a long way towards compensating for the difference in remuneration between the two "worlds". Oh, and one other thing, although I always figured I lived to work, I am probably working more hours now than I ever did as a "C" level executive. Good luck and let us know how things proceed.
 
I really welcome and appreciate all of the comments and coaching. That is exactly what I am looking for! If there are any "Buckeye" framers out there that wouldn't mind my stopping by their shop, please let me know.
 
CAFramer put his finger on what may be the most
critical attribute of those who thrive in framing,
a passion for solving problems. The best of such
solutions draw from other fields (medicine engineering, food and military packaging), and we can only hope that Dr. A will share his experiences to our benefit.

Welcome,

Hugh
 
Somehow, I do not think making additional income is of major concern to Dr.A. Based on that, I would suggest he just purchase some equipment, rent some space, and go for it. He can learn as he goes. Getting over the government mindset of having lots of people working for him, as a sign of success, may prove to be a little costly at first, but he will catch on, eventually.

John
 
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