Newbie with a few quick questions

MrsVH

Grumbler
Joined
Sep 3, 2006
Posts
21
From
Burlington, ON, Canada
Hello!

I found this site a while back and have been enjoying reading through all the advise and colourful comments. I am new to the framing game. My husband is a photographer and we have decided to try expand the business to include custom framing. I have taken a course on framing, invested in a mat cutter and can't wait to get started but have a few quick questions.
I noticed that 3M ATG tape also comes in a "Gold" non-acid version does this mean that the regular is not a non-acid version? (yes...as I type this sounds like a stupid question but...)
Also I was trying to determine what to use as a backing board. When mounting I will be doing hinges or 3M PMA...other than the obvious of using matboard what would make a good mounting board? I noticed that United has an acid free mounting board but is it really acid free (my understanding is that we are to be wary of such labels)?
Is there one piece of equipment you could not do without when starting up?
Finally, I was considering getting a manual underpinner/v-nailer? Any suggestions?
Sorry this is so long. My course got me all jazzed up and I have dreaming and thinking about matting and framing non-stop for the last few weeks.

Cheers!
 

Framar

WOW Framer
Joined
Jul 24, 2001
Posts
26,389
From
Buffalo, New York, USA/Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada
Hi, neighbor (or should I say, neighbour) - Welcome to the Grumble!

About the ATG - since it is never used anywhere near the artwork I for one do not bother with the Acid Free sort. I don't really use it much more anyways - I attach double mats together with my Solo Glue Writer which uses a proprietory white or PVA type adhesive. I also use this for attaching backing paper.

About the only thing I use as mounting board anymore is Artcare Acid-Free Foam board or Artcare Restore. With really special artworks being hinged I also use a solid rag matboard of some sort.

Do you need a V-nailer? On the Grumble you'll find as many opinions (on everything!) as there are Grumblers, but I have been framing for almost 4 decades and my shop has been open for 25 years and I join frames with a Stanley corner vise, brads, and Maxim (blue label) glue.

It all depends on how many frames you need to join each day or week. My shop is small, I can join 10 frames in an hour (unless they are "fussy" ones) and that suits me fine.

But others will be along with completely differing opinions.

Welcome to the Grumble (and to make long posts easier to read I always recommend

spaces!
 

Rozmataz

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 13, 2002
Posts
2,773
From
Fingerlakes Region of NYS
Welcome from not too far away as well!

Besides the mat cutter the other piece of equipment I treasure is my heat press!! As you are framing alot of photography, you may want to consider one. Mine is a smaller format which works great - the only time it is a problem is on an oversize piece - where I have to drymount in sections - just takes a bit more time!!

Good luck,

Roz
 

J Phipps TN

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jul 14, 2004
Posts
1,423
From
Kingsport TN
I would have to say, I love my foot petal Cassesse V-nailer.(CS-79) I started out with a thumb-nail machine, and don't recomend them, They throw saw dust and are loud.

If you are going to be joining your own frames, this is an inexpensive way to do it. The machine is in managable parts so, if it messes up, it probably just needs a new part. I, as a woman, find it something I can take apart and fix myself.

Also, I love my filet chopper. It is an older one, but what an asset to any frame shop. Filets add beauty and proffit to any frame job!

You have an advantage over most framers, an instant customer base, since your husband is a photographer! Have fun!
 

nona powers

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 15, 1999
Posts
735
From
san diego
If you visit www.artfacts.org, everything you need to know about preservation materials and methods is basically there. It's hard to read, but whatever you don't understand, you can came here for clarification. Read Standards 2000 and PMMB-2000

Most of the time, a full four ply mat, eight is preferred, hinged to a four ply back or mount board, to which the art has been hinged with preservation type hinges all materials are preservation grade, and the Artcare foamboard is a filler board, behind the mount or backboard. Thus would be for collectable fiber based photographs. Decorative photographs or RC type can go directly on the Artcare filler board with corner pockets or edge strips
 

MrsVH

Grumbler
Thread starter
Joined
Sep 3, 2006
Posts
21
From
Burlington, ON, Canada
Thank you so much! I can't wait to get started and it is wonderful that such a great resource exists for all of us who are new and those who can still learn something.

I agree that filets do add an elegant touch and am looking forward to trying them out (although I am also a bit hesitant as I can understand they can be a bit tricker...per Decor Aug 06 article).

My husband is also looking forward to the value added service framing can provide. Unfortunatly he too suffers from the big box perception of pricing. People seem to think that because you can get 10 prints with no sitting fee for under $10 at Walmart and because photography has gone digital that prices should be as low everywhere. Sheer lunacy I tell you.
 

HannaFate

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Apr 29, 2002
Posts
10,688
From
Corrales, New Mexico
Just a note about ATG and acid and stuff. The rather large project I am currently working on involves taking apart a lot of things that were framed in the 70's. It has been interesting seeing the effects.

The regular foam board backings have yellowed only very slightly, and are not brittle or degraded. They do not seem to have affected the pieces mounted on them. (not printed on rag paper, of course, so I still reccommend archival foam board for things that are.)

The ATG used does not seem to have affected un-coated papers. On clay coated paper items, there is a slight stain, that looks like it is from oils rather than acid. So, I give the "gold" ATG a snort.

The mat board used was "buffered", meaning that the back layer of paper on it was acid free, but not the rest of it. On most pieces, there is no visible damage from contact with the back of the mat board, However, on almost all, there is a slight halo of acid burn creeping in from the cut edge.

And, of course, the mats are yellowed, and brittle.

Shrink wrapped items are stained yellow by the shrink wrap. Price tags placed on the shrink wrap left darker stains beneeath them. Yes! Use acetate bags, rather than shrink wrap on anything worth keeping for thirty years!

Items taped on all four sides of the mat are rippled in an interesting starburst pattern. I have managed to flatten some uncoated papers by steaming them lightly and drying them under pressure in a warm press. (100 degrees) The clay coated papers I am not going to try to flatten. That's for someone else to do.

And, I won't give you any details on the masking tape... I might start to cry!
 
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