Newbie questions

Marine Framer

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Jan 23, 2004
Posts
14
From
Manassas, VA
I have a few questions about two projects I have and one that's too big for me.

I am framing my first mirror. Is there anything special I need to know?

I am also framing a piece of Belgian lace and a small embroidered table runner. The customer wants to starch both pieces before I frame them but I thought I read somewhere that the starch would attract "critters." If seal the piece properly with kraft paper, do is there still a concern about "critters?" I know conservation glass will help protect the mat but will conservation glass be any different than regular glass with regard to fabric? I plan to use conservation glass but I was just wondering.

And finally, a customer I have done work for has a piece of art from Fiji that is a very delicate paper like fabric. It at least 6' x 6' and currently folded and put away. She wants to display so the creases from the folds don't cause damage but of course needs to protect it (from light and kids). She wants conservation glass. Any ideas on who could take a project that big?

Thanks for help with any of the above.

Semper fidelis,
(Always Faithful)
Marine Framer
 

JRB

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Aug 12, 2000
Posts
7,106
From
San Diego, CA
The main thing about framing a mirror is that you have to blacken the inside of the rabbit so that bare wood will not reflect in the mirror.

Kraft paper will not keep the critters out, they can also get in from the front, around the glass. If what they are after is appealing enough, they will eat through the Kraft to get at it. I have never heard that starch will attract critters, however, one of the things I have learned for sure is, if in doubt, don't do it.

Conservation glass is an excellent idea for fabrics, it will cut down on UV light and help prevent fading and I'm sure a few other problems. Just make certain that the glass does not come in contact with the fabric in the frame package, use mats or spacers.

I can't help you with the oversize project.

John

"All the way," Airborne.
 

jframe

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Charter Member
Joined
Jan 1, 1997
Posts
4,251
From
Fort Worth, Texas
There are people in your area who will help you with a 6' x 6 ' job. I don't
know who they are, but maybe Ellen Collins or Hugh Phibbs will be able to tell
you. Also I think the Small Corp is you area, or in one of the states around
you....which is in your area by Texas standards.

As for the starch, I think I have heard of someone on the Grumble starching
doilies. I mean someone who is an authority. Have you searched for words
like doily, oversize etc.?
 

stud d

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
Posts
2,382
From
next too you
Welcome to the grumble,
make sure with the mirror you put foamcore or coroplast behind it. this is to give it stability and so you dont use framer points directly on the silvering of the mirror.

If your piece is six foot by six foot, conservation glass does not come that large. and it would also be much to heavy. someone did suggest small corp, they are in massachuesetts. you can most likely google the name to find them. they make plexi boxes and things of that nature.
on the other hand if you are not comfortable with this size i can refer you to a place in dc that does alot of work for museums.
d
 

Puppyraiser

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 10, 1999
Posts
6,569
From
Maryland
Business
Howards retired
The problems I see with a 6' x6' piece of very lightweight paper is that the static electricity from the plex ('cause you couldn't use glass, of course)would pull that puppy up unless you give it a good deep space. I'm thinking to mount it on a backing and fabric covered strainer and put a plex box on top of it. The plex box would be a real PIA. The last time I did something this huge, I had to rent a truck to get the plex box to the customer, assemble the strainer/box in the truck and then carry it in. I hate to think how much I didn't make on that job. Oh, yes, and did I mention that I had to have 4 of us lift the plex box from its wooden crate so that there was no torque to snap the seams? The customer husband and wife, my husband and I were the 4... So be sure to bid it really really really high. There are unexpected expenses hidden everywhere here. But it can be done. Is there any chance that it could be displayed folded in half or quarters? Denending on the pattern, an alternate presentation should be considered....

"Where are we moving to now?"... Army wife
 

MerpsMom

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Charter Member
Joined
Jan 1, 1997
Posts
4,247
From
Leawood, Kansas USA
MarineFramer, depending on how large your mirror is, I protect the integrity of the frame corners by installing corner braces, or triangular pieces of Masonite, or even back the whole frame with Masonite, that latter for really heavy ones. And we always finish off the back with our normal dustcover and mirror straps or WallBuddies.

Somewhere in the archives, there is detailed info on all this. Maybe type in Mirrors.
 

Framerguy

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Apr 12, 2001
Posts
7,261
From
Destin, Florida
One problem with using starch on fabrics is that, over time, it has a tendency to turn yellow. If the fabric is properly supported (mounted), it should stay in place without the aid of starch. One other problem with starch is that, if the piece is large and isn't ironed properly, it will be quite difficult to get squared up when mounting as it will be stiffer than natural washed fabric. My inclination is to not allow starch or sizing to remain on a piece of fabric when framing it.

Starch, being organic in nature, would possibly attract pests in search of food but I cannot verify that this has actually happened. I haven't had that experience with any fabric that has come into my shop for reframing in past years.

Regarding the mirror, since you didn't say how large the mirror is, I would follow the advice given here. Back the mirror with either foamcore or coroplast, darken the rabbet so it doesn't reflect its color through the edges of the mirror, and, if the mirror is quite large, reinforce it with cleats or masonite backing so it doesn't torque and either break the miters loose or break the mirror while handling it. Once it is on the wall it should be stable unless you fail to install it with a suitable hanger system. The large WallBuddies are rated at around 60 lbs. which would include a fairly large plate glass mirror. If the mirror is large I would ensure that the moulding that supports it and is its link to the hanging system that will hold it on the wall be substantial enough to support the weight of the finished package.

Framerguy
 
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