Newbie needs help with a jersey

itgsports

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Mar 30, 2006
Posts
12
Location
california
Hello, I have received my 1st jersey to frame. I have read a lot of posts on this matter and was wondering if anybody had an easy alternitive to sewing (I am a guy so of course I cant sew). I have heard more bad things about the attach-ez then good, so dont know if that is a good idea. What about just "filling" the jersey with foamboard to give it a stretched look then just useing the small colored sewing pins to tack it in. Any other idea's would be helpful. Also with glass, double matting, the jersey and foamboard, how deep of a rabbit do I need to frame this job. Would 3/4 inch be enough?
 
itg: If you can't sew maybe you have a friend, wife, or relative who can. Just be sure whatever you do involves no adhesives and is reversible.
I would not attempt to use a frame that has a rabbet any shallower than about 1" minimum. 1.5" or more would be preferable if you have multiple mat layers too. If you are on a tight budget, try Larson's Ansley line. It is simple but very useful, and well priced.
:cool: Rick
 
Sewing is the way to go. I was a home-ec failure and still can't sew to save my life but I can sew things to mat boards. If I can do it, so can you. The worst part is threading the needle. ;)
 
We usually cut a piece of matboard and shape it to fill the inside of the jersey; this helps eliminate the wrinkles. You can sew through the matboard without much effort. Use lots of stitches. If the name is on the back of the jersey, you may want to mount it with the back facing the viewer.

Jack Cee
 
"We usually cut a piece of matboard and shape it to fill the inside of the jersey"
on that subject....would purchasing a shirt pattern help her???most of us have some kind of pattern by trial & error(& that was a big pain in the.....) Not being around anyone who sews I have no one to ask this of, but would seem to be a much quicker way to get a good/reliable one, yes/no????
 
I'm not sure where you are getting your information from but there are thousands of framers who are using Attach-EZ daily and love it.

As a new framer you may want to ask people like Jim Miller and Rob Markoff about Attach-EZ before you write it off as a bad product. Many of the schools are teaching the use of it as well as many of the experts. It isn't the answer to all fabric mounting, but it will make your life much easier a good portion of the time.
 
Originally posted by itgsports:
... I have heard more bad things about the attach-ez then good, so dont know if that is a good idea...
Keep reading until you discover that Attach EZ is better than sewing, for most garment mounting jobs. The nylon fasteners are more secure and install faster than stitches. The Tool & fasteners are made to separate a fabric's weave, so will not harm most fabrics. Poke the tool from the back, through the mount board, the back layer of fabric, and the support-insert board. It is usually not necessary to run the tool all the way through the front layer of fabric.

Do not use Attach EZ on fragile or very fine-woven fabrics. Attach-EZ is best for run-of-the-mill retail jobs, such as a signed football jersey. But if the garment is very valuable, even if new, I might still take the time to sew with cotton thread.

Always use a support-insert. That is, place a trimmed-to-fit, 4-ply alphacellulose board inside the garment to give it support and body. Sand the edges of the board to prevent snags or cutting the fabric. Foam center board would be OK for most retail jobs, but not as easy to trim in odd shapes as 4-ply board. If you choose to use foam center board, I suggest Bainbridge ArtCare.

The support-insert is what you fasten to the mount board. That is, the garment itself is supported by the insert, and the insert is supported by the fasteners.

I suggest using a frame at least 1" deep for a T-shirt or other small, flat garment. For fluffy fabrics and large garments, I suggest at least 1-1/2" rabbet depth. Nielsen's 100 series mouldings are box-extruded with handy, integral shadowbox sides. Also, Larson-Juhl offers ready-made garmet frames with hangers inside, at a reasonable price.

There's an article coming up in Picture Framing Magazine, maybe the upcoming issue, about framing a sport jacket. The subject of the article is a very garish plaid jacket, but the same methods work for any color or pattern...
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We prefer to use jersey cases, from LJ or SpartaCraft ....we just don't like the static look of a form inside the item ... the cases have a large hanger inside, the backing is up to the framer, and the whole thing looks more natural ...
 
Thank you all for your help, as for the attach-ez I did see you in Las Vegas a few months back, giving the demo. It did look like a great tool and very easy to use, but when I came on these boards, a lot of people had some sort of problem with the tool. Mostly the needles breaking, a few the fastners breaking. Will the attach-ez go through both a foamboard and mat board at the same time or is that too thick to shoot through?
 
Originally posted by FramingFool:
We prefer to use jersey cases, from LJ or SpartaCraft ....we just don't like the static look of a form inside the item ... the cases have a large hanger inside, the backing is up to the framer, and the whole thing looks more natural ...
The prepared jersey frames save a lot of time and hassle. Most of them may be quickly fitted with turnbuttons for easy opening/reclosing, so the garment may be taken out & put back. That's when a hanger may be the best mounting option.

For garments made of supple fabrics, such as silk, satin, Lycra, and lightweight cotton, the "natural" look of hanging on a hanger is only temporary. You might want to reconsider using a support inside the garment. Clothes are made to hang on a person, which gives good support. A hanger alone can not do that very well.

I don't know what you mean by the term "static look of a form inside" the garment, but for the most natural, on-the-body appearance, use layers of polyfill (polyester quilt batting) attached to the support-insert. Of course, that may require a deeper frame, as well.

If you've ever seen how garments look after a few years on a hanger in a closet, you know that a lot of fabrics will, over time, stretch, sag and develop unnatural wrinkles if you just use a hanger to mount them for framing.
 
a lot of people had some sort of problem with the tool.
What you will notice is that there is almost no company, no material and no tool that is universally loved by all of us. Not even Wall Buddies!

And we tend to be more vocal as critics than as supporters.

For what it's worth (not much, really) I have found Attach-EZ a huge help for many types of projects, including jersey framing.

Welcome to The Grumble.
 
itgssorts, If you have any questions about Attach-EZ please call me. I will try to answer all of your questions. As Ron Eggers said, not everyone will like every product out there and I don't expect everyone to like my products either, but there are thousands using Attach-EZ today who love it. They can't all be wrong. The Attach-EZ 800 should be used by anyone who is having any problems with their tools. I don't want anyone to be unhappy and one phone call may be very helpful-800-527-52-521.
 
I guess I didn't look very closely at this when I wrote my 800 number on the reply to itgssorts. My 800 # is 1-800-527-1521. Sorry for the confusion.
 
I am certain that without this tool it would take much, much more time than we now spend. I realize that we don't do near as many jerseys as most of the anti-attach-EZ crowd (so far in 2006 we have done 116) so I can't speak with authority

Imagine that we only saved 20 minutes per..that's about 23 hours so far

I guess I will never understand those "Ludites" that not only don't want to use a tool like this, but don't think anyone else should either


If ever there ought to be a "Collins Dictum" corollary, it ought to include tools and techniques
 
Originally posted by MatFramer:
I love the attach-EZ for doing jerseys.
In the famous two words of Sue aka stshof...Me too!
thumbsup.gif
 
Wow Bob you know your history! I had to look up luddites to see what it meant.
 
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