Newbie here - Question on putting text on mat board

Jeff S.

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Posts
9
Location
DFW, TX - USA
Hello All -

This is my first post here and I hope you can give me some ideas for an issue I have with framing and mounting some photos.

I have some 10x8 photos (produced from medium format negs) of some family portraits that are in my Dad's house. I also have the research that my Mom did on the people that the portraits are of. I want to combine the two and hang them in my house. There are seven in all. I am a dyi framer so I have some experience with framing and I own a simple Logan 301-S mat cutter.

Ok so here is the question. I have made a layout as shown in the attached mock up. Currently the text is printed on a transparency that is laid over the mat but I would like to have the text (circled in red for the purpose of this post - not really on the artwork) directly on mat itself. Is there anyway to do this?

NOTE: The portrait in this mock up is just a screen shot from the web. The ones that I am framing are done by the same artist and are in the same style. I can post them if it will help.

So if anyone has any ideas I would love to hear them.

EDIT: The frame size is 28x20 the rust mat board is Autum and is 5" all the way around. The bottom mat board is Cheesecake.

Thanks in advance!
Jeff

portraitlayout1_web.jpg


[ 08-02-2006, 02:15 PM: Message edited by: Jeff S. ]
 
Welcome to the G.

There are several options including but not limited to:

Quick and easy: Use two openings in the mat, one for the photo, one for the text; text would be printed on suitable stock in this case.

If you really want the image and the text in the same opening as in your example: Either (a) use Photoshop (or similar) to combine phot & text into a single image; print; mat with single opening. Or (b) print text on suitable stock; mount to suitable substrate; float photo where required; Mat with single opening.

Alternatively use a printer that can handle thick substrates (or sub out to someone who has one) to print directly onto mat. Epson Stylus Pros wil handle matboard.
 
Originally posted by CAframer:
Welcome to the G.

There are several options including but not limited to:

Quick and easy: Use two openings in the mat, one for the photo, one for the text; text would be printed on suitable stock in this case.

If you really want the image and the text in the same opening as in your example: Either (a) use Photoshop (or similar) to combine phot & text into a single image; print; mat with single opening. Or (b) print text on suitable stock; mount to suitable substrate; float photo where required; Mat with single opening.

Alternatively use a printer that can handle thick substrates (or sub out to someone who has one) to print directly onto mat. Epson Stylus Pros wil handle matboard.
Andrew -

Thanks so much for the quick reply! My very first attempt was two 7.5"x9.5" cutouts in the cheesecake mat. I printed the text on some heavy beige linen paper. Some how it just looked odd. My artist sister said it was "dead" space. Perhaps I should go back to that and use a different color paper.

It is hard to tell from the mock up but the pic is under the cheesecake board via a cutout and the text on top of the mat with no cutout (or at least that is what I would like).

I didn't think about using Photoshop that is a smart idea. I will have to play around with that option. I will have to check around to see if someone can handle the 28x20 size stock of the cheesecake mat board. That is also something I did not consider.

Someone here at work suggested using some sort of heat transfer paper. Anyone ever use anything like that on mat board?

Regards,
Jeff
 
The dead space issue can be resolved by better layout design. Right now you have disproportionate spacing around text. Try varying the size of the text. Try placing text below photo with about 1.1/2" between openings (assuming 1/4" reveal).
 
I have had info screen printed on to a mat, but that would prove too expensive for one time use.
Check with your local trophy shop (or frame shop for that matter) to see if they have a laser engraver (VersaLaser). Might be able to use that to write the text on the board.
I have also done smaller applications by removing the surface paper from the mat and then using a conventional ink-jet printer to apply the information. I did overmat the text, but the text and the overmat were of the same color.
God luck, looks like an interesting project.
 
If you really want the text on the mat surface: You can output the text as a graphic or word processing file and send it to a service bureau (a company that does pre-press work for graphic designers). Ask them to output it as a Matricolor or Identicolor transfer. This becomes a rub-on transfer like old fashioned Letraset or Prestype. This is the same method used for putting text on the wall at a museum show. I use this for putting student names on the matting of school class photos I do for a client every year. My cost is about $85. / page for the process.
:cool: Rick
 
...and just as an answer to a question you didn't even ask, if the person is facing to the left as your example is, move that opening to the right, so that the person is facing into the center. This will also help alleviate the 'dead space' issue visually speaking.
 
Good suggestion, Ellen.
:cool: Rick
Is it just me, or does the lady in the picture look a little bit like Frances McDormand?
 
Thanks for all the great suggestions. I had thought about the pre-press transfer stuff but I have not found anyone who wants to do just seven.

Just some information about the text. What is shown is an example. Currently the text is 12 point and on the photos with the most research done it takes up the full 8x10 space others take up less than half that. So what you are seeing is the worst case.

I wanted to use the same font size and weight for all of the portraits maybe I need to re-think this? Yes I am using a 1/4" reveal. Currently the text portion is 2.5" from the portrait. I will try moving it in closer making the overall cheesecake area smaller to see if that helps the dead space. Doing this would result in some uneven borders for the frame size I am trying to use. Perhaps I could just have a bigger reveal of the cheesecake mat board on the sides instead of changing the rust over mat. Redoing the frames is a possibilty too.

I tried to put the text underneath since most people recommend that to me but having to allow for the most text (8x10) plus the photo plus a nice large even border resulted in a final result that was just to tall (~19"x33" including the frame) for the wall space (7' ceilings) that I have to so the side by side placement is a compromise that I have to deal with.

Whew that is a post
This stuff is harder then it looks sometimes! This is my first oddball project all the others were just standard stuff. If it gets too wonky I may hand off the project to one of you professionals but there is a certain amount of pride in doing it yourself with a project like this as I am sure you can imagine. Anyway ya all have given me some avenues to try which is awesome. If anyone else wants to chime in please do.

THANKS!
Jeff
 
Originally posted by EllenAtHowards:
...and just as an answer to a question you didn't even ask, if the person is facing to the left as your example is, move that opening to the right, so that the person is facing into the center. This will also help alleviate the 'dead space' issue visually speaking.
Wow good point! I didn't even think of that. Again that particular picture is just an example but I think all subjects in the portraits are looking in the same direction as well. I will scan in the actual photos this eveing so you can see what they look like.

Regards,
Jeff
 
Ok so here are some mockups using the actual text and photos. I took some of the suggestions here. I moved the text closer to the picture, increased the font to 14pt, and varied the side the font was on depending on the direction that the subjects are looking.

Judge William Baker Brown

JudgeWilliamBakerBrown_framed1_web.jpg


Rev. Lemuel Brooks

RevLemuelBrooks_framed1_web.jpg


William Brown Jr.

WilliamBrownJr_framed8_web.jpg


Elizabeth Brown Savage

ElizabethBrownSavage_framed1_web.jpg


Maria Brown Brooks

MariaBrownBrooks_framed1_web.jpg



Norman Savage

NormanSavage_framed1_web.jpg



Rachael Button Willey Brown

RachaelButtonWilleyBrown_framed1_web.jpg


Let me know what ya all think.

Thanks!
Jeff
 
I think that's a lot of red! Or rust, you said?
Especially if they will hang as a group. And by "cheescake board", do you mean cheesecake-colored matboard?

I liked Andrew's idea of a seperate opening for the text, sized to fit the paragraph, but I think the way you have it is fine too. Probably more uniform overall, easier on the eyes when standing back and looking at the group. Only 7 openings instead of 14 different-sized ones, especially if you use the rust mat.
Just my humble little opinion, since you asked.
 
If the overall mat size is smaller than A4, I have in the past printed text onto good quality paper in the required position on a standard inkjet, carefully pasted the paper onto mountboard, then when dry, cut the aperture through both.

You just have to be careful to align everything straight when pasting down. Don't forget inkjet ink is usually watersoluble, whereas laser isn't

Paul Hardy
 
A text formatting suggestion: If you select "block" style for the "Paragraph" formatting, it will give a very clean look to the text instead of jagged edges on the right hand side (from lines of different lengths).

Also, for the pieces where there is plenty of room above and below the text portion, wider left and right margins may improve the proportion of white space surrounding the text.

Welcome to TG!

Amy
 
And one more option! ... Just put a very abridged version of the text (name, date, and no more than a couple of lines of information) in a small opening beneath the photo. Then include the full text on the back of the frame. Aesthetically this could be more pleasing.
 
Originally quoted by Andrew:

And one more option! ... Just put a very abridged version of the text (name, date, and no more than a couple of lines of information) in a small opening beneath the photo. Then include the full text on the back of the frame. Aesthetically this could be more pleasing.
I think Andrew's suggestion is very good.
thumbsup.gif
That way you would have more consistency between the looks of the 7 frames and not have to worry about having a lot of dead space in some of the frames. Also, the grouping wouldn't take up as much space (but then you would have to redo the frames, Jeff)
 
I like them. Very "museum" looking!!!

But have you solved the text on the mat surface yet?

Why not dress up the mat the text is on with some v-grooves around the paper you will print the copy onto, rather than a separate opening?

Roz
 
Thanks for all the suggestions wow amazing! Yes cheesecake is in reference to the color not a special type or texture of mat board.

I like Amy's idea of blocking the text so I will try that.

Andrew's suggestion of just a little bit of information under the pic and the rest elsewhere is a good too. I may play around with that idea.

As far as actually getting the text on the mat I have access to several 11"x17" color laser copiers/printers so I am going to try Andrew's first suggestion of scanning, photoshopping, adding text, and printing on photo paper. I just need to find a source for 11"x17" laser photo paper (I may have to buy online). I may also just print out the text on 11"X17" white paper and tea stain it (or color paper if I can find some) and paste it on the mat and then cut the opening as Paul and others have suggested. I have talked to a trophy shop and they don't know how the laser will work with mat board but they said I could bring in a sample so that may work.

So right now I have lots of options to investigate. I have a feeling I am going to end up with a bunch of scrap mat
but I am having fun so onwards and upwards!

Thanks again for all the input and keep it coming!

Jeff
 
Ok well just a quick update for those of you following this. I tried some of the iron on transfer paper for ink jets (normally used for t-shirts) and it worked ok but not perfectly and I did not like the finish.

I am almost done cutting out the mats for another test which is basically what Andrew said in the very first reply hehe. So the text will be printed on a nice piece of paper, placed 1.5 away from the portrait with a one inch strip of the rust colored mat on top of that leaving a 1/4" reveal of the cheesecake colored mat all the way around the the portrait and the text.

Laters,
Jeff
 
Hey Wally-Since we have a Versalaser, I can say that as small as the font appears, it may not be easily read.

But, on that color it would look impressive
 
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