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Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

Need help making hand-painted (or sprayed), black-satin finish

Wesley Braithwaite

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Mar 10, 2016
Messages
5
I'm looking to replicate a smooth, black finish that i've seen on Many high-end moulding, and low end as well. These are the frames in particular --- Roma 8546 (The edge) and Roma 10771000. I've seen these finishes done by nearly every manufacturer but I don't know exactly how they do it.

My untested theory is a simple gesso with a black bole, finished with something like shellac or polyurethane. Can I get a smooth, black, matte (or satin) finish with that? What would you recommend?

Also, if you have any tips for achieving the finish on the surface of Roma 8546, that would be amazing as well. I know they gold leaf it, but I don't know exactly what they've finished over-top of that. I've used glaze a bit, and it seems like it could come close to it as well. Perhaps a casein paint process?
 

Luddite

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Dec 17, 2007
Messages
5,432
Not traditional....but I have yet to see a finish I cannot replicate with acrylics. Not artist colors,those little craft type bottles (e.g. Decoart,etc.) that are sold in various art/craft stores. That first example you posted (oxidized cranberry) is a relatively simple finish for acrylics. I love those.A true smooth matte black may be a job for KRYLON! L
 

Aaron Randall

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
124
I found the only way to replicate the smooth, flawless finishes is to use a high grit sandpaper or wet sanding, much like if you were painting a car. Even if you finish it with a matte coating, wet sanding makes a huge difference.
 

Aaron Randall

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
124
The other thing I'll add is that most shops have a compressor, and a decent airbrush is pretty cheap. Not a bad tool to have around to do some pretty cool projects.
 
Hoffmann Dovetail Joining System

Wesley Braithwaite

Grumbler in Training
Thread starter
Joined
Mar 10, 2016
Messages
5
Why not just use prefinished mouldings?
I want to offer hand made, seamless moulding to artists. My dad is a painter and many, many artists are switching to hand-made, gold-leafed, seamless frames. We do have a large number of pre-finished mouldings, I really just want to be able to make some myself as well. Not to mention, people are willing to pay 400-600+ dollars for a nice, hand-made frame these days.

I found the only way to replicate the smooth, flawless finishes is to use a high grit sandpaper or wet sanding, much like if you were painting a car. Even if you finish it with a matte coating, wet sanding makes a huge difference.
That's good advice. I'll try that out. Do you have any recommendations on the painting medium? I like the idea of an airbrush, I think we'll be getting one soon.

A true smooth matte black may be a job for KRYLON!
Any specific products you might recommend? I'll also be doing water-gilding in the future and worry about oil-based products not melding well with acrylic finishes and what not.
 

Artistic Framer

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
425
I use a good quality latex gloss black on a well primed and sanded surface - build up 3 light coats sanding between coats (usually 220 grit), and do a final buff out on the last coat with 0000 steel wool
 

Prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,298
Not difficult to do. The hard part is having a place to spray it. Overspray settles for yards around. A well ventilated area and a face mask is advisable.

A while ago a customer showed me a little piece of his handywork, namely a plank of wood that he had spray-painted to an incredible hi-gloss black.
I think he said he used several coats of filler primer such as is used for car bodywork repairs. Lots of sanding and multiple coats of lacquer.

Smooth black is not a finish I have ever done. Too lazy. :oops: But I have used black acrylic gesso brushed on for some very cool textured black finishes.
You can stipple it, comb it or simply lay in random broad brushmarks. Polishes up nicely with a touch of wax and steel wool.
 

Aaron Randall

CGF, Certified Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
124
Createx airbrush paints seem to cover most bases for anything you'll paint on. A lot of people who paint wood do lay a basecoat or gesso down first, or some type of filler, then sand that smooth. Createx doesn't need to be diluted, but can to expose the woodgrain. You can also airbrush a clearcoat over easily as well.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

CB Art & Framing

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 20, 2007
Messages
2,120
The only reason I can see a customer wanting a hand finished frame, would be for a special finish or for closed corners as you mentioned.
For closed corner on flat black, I would just take a stckk black moulding, gently sand, fill and sand corners and use black as base coat.
Then spary with black satin of your choice.
 

Wesley Braithwaite

Grumbler in Training
Thread starter
Joined
Mar 10, 2016
Messages
5
The styles of frames that artists have been using are hand-gilded, seamless frames with custom finishes. The satin black finish is mostly an accent to the rest of the frame. Thanks everyone so much for your suggestions, they're greatly appreciated.
 

Artistic Framer

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
Messages
425
"Are you talking about a simple house paint? Sherwin Williams? Valspar?"


Recently I've been using "Rustoleum". Use the best quality synthetic brush you can get, and treat it nice. :)
 

Prospero

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 16, 2007
Messages
19,298
Once upon a time I would make a frame from of the good old 1/2" black cushion, gently radius the corners and smooth the miter.
then give it a spray with metallic auto paint. Minimum prep needed and the paint stuck very well.
I don't know if the formulation in rattle cans has changed since then. I think it was the aggressive solvent in the paint that effectively
welded the paint to the plasticy coating of the moulding. The only thing to do is try it and see.
Important not to have greasy patches on the surface so a wipe over with a de-greaser is a good idea and once de-greased avoid touching the
surface to be painted.
 

dpframing

CGF II, Certified Grumble Framer Level 2
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
282
As far as store-bought aerosol spray paints are concerned, I find that the Rustoleum 2X line is the best. Lots of pigment- 2 or 3 coats and goes on dripless.
 
Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC
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