Navajo wool rug current framing concepts

Sherry Lee

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After doing a search, I have more questions and wondered if there was more updated information regarding framing an "expensive" Navajo wool rug (about 16" x 20").

1) Is it still advisable to treat for moths by freezing the rug prior to framing? And do you have the customer do this before bringing it in?

2) I read where a rag mat is placed over a strong substrate, (?coroplast?) but many mentioned they cover the rag mat with fabric via drymount application; or use suede or fabric matboard. Is the fabric for decorative reasons only?....or is there a scientific reason to attach the rug to a fabric covered matboard vs. directly onto the rag mat?

3) And wool thread is preferred for attaching the rug??

4) Why do some use a strainer? Can't this be done like a shadowbox?

Thank you, thank you for any and all input!!
 

Framar

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If the rug is valuable I'd use well-washed unbleached muslin over artcare board - and a strainer depending on weight of rug and size (depth, sturdiness) of frame.

I also would use strong cotton thread because wool thread wouldn't be strong enough. There is probably cotton in the weave of the rug.

Just my 2 cents.
 

stud d

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To give another idea, I would used the unbleached muslin over artcare foam board, but I would adhere that with 969 and glue to coroplast. If it is heavy two slices of coroplast with cross (+)grain. This allows for a lighter package as well as a thinner frame.


I read 16'' x20'' ? My little brain will not allow me to remember those ' '' things...dumb question alert Which is foot and which is inch? I think it is ' is foot and twoo '' is inch. Someone tell me I am a fathead or not

Patrick Leeland
 

Rebecca

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Hi Sherry,

Re the insects, this was writtin on the conservation distribution list by Mary Lou Florian who is THE insect guru in the conservation world.

"....The literature is extensively
reviewed in my book, Heritage Eaters, Insects and Fungi in
Heritage Collections. James and James, 1997. ... Ice crystal
formation is essential for death of insects. This is one of the
many reasons that the normal chest freezer in which the temperature
change is slow enough to cause ice formation in insects, is used.
The effects of this procedure on a number of artifact materials has
also been researched and shown to have no effects. Empirical results show that it is
effective in killing most household insects. The most important
thing to research before the effect on the insects, is the effect
of this dramatic regime of reduced temperature on the materials been
treated. If there is no effect on the material them the research on
the effect on the insects can logically follow...."

Mary-Lou Florian

I generally wrap in plastic bag, freeze for 48 hrs, let come back to room temperature, and repeat.

For a textile that small (16 x 20 inches) I would probably stitch it to a washed fabric - colorfast, but of a color that compliments the textile - making sure to catch the cotton warps, but allowing the front of the stitches to sink between the wefts so they are not visible. Cotton wrapped polyester is a nice stitching thread. Stitching along perimeter and perhaps some interior stitching, depending on weight etc.

You can prepare the fabric covered mount first, using rigid materials and hot gluing a thin wooden strainer to the reverse. You can then staple the show fabric to the strainer. Or, you could eliminate the wooden strainer and use BEVA film to secure the fabric to the reverse of the board. then stitch the textile to the fabric with a curved needle. A layer of needlepunched polyester batting, like Insulate, under the show fabric makes stitching a bit easier.

I know you framers like to stitch to matboard - I'm sure it's a matter of custom and training - we all tend to prefer what we're familiar with. I'm strictly a stitch to fabric person and the backing fabric gives an extra friction grip to the textile being mounted.

Rebecca
 

Sherry Lee

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Rebecca & others,

Freezing the material concerns me because I have this "horror thought" that as the rug defrosts, any water might cause the colors to bleed. Then it would be "off with my head"! I'm not in to doing tests since running a test doesn't guarantee the whole piece!

Comments??
 

Rebecca

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Sherry,

There shouldn't be enough moisture in the yarn to make ice crystals - if there is, you've got a whole other set of problems. :eek:

If it isn't infested with insects, it doesn't need to be treated for them. If it is, something should be done about it by someone before you allow it in your work space. Logically, that would point you back to the owner or a textile conservator, and give you the perfect excuse for not doing something you're not comfortable with.
;)

Rebecca
 

Baer Charlton

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EIndianBlanket.jpg


Fiberglass screen door screening stretched over strainer. Covered with linen (ph 7).

Heck of a lot easier to stitch 287 stitches through, than ragboard over coroplast.

Just as supportive and breaths too.
 

preservator

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Please note that the unbleached muslin in
Rebecca's post was well-washed. Even if the wool
goes into the frame, uninfested, if bugs can get
into the frame, they will and they are shy of light, so they will dine in the dark. Sealing the
frame, carefully with a sealing foil or with a foil based tape can discouraged their entry.

Hugh
 

preservator

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The Tyvek should work well, but pressure-sensitive
materials on wood have a poor track record. The
wood seeks to draw out some of the components that
make the adhesive sticky. Even on frames that have
a coated back, the pressure-sensitive will oxidize
in time and is likely to loose its grip. Hotmelt
could be extruded onto the frame and the Tyvek
could be bonded to it with a tacking iron. Sealing
the glazing to the rabbet would also help, since
many of these insects can be quite small.

HUgh
 

jframe

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It might also be a good idea to place the mounted rug into the frame on a slant, that is it would be closer to the glass on the bottom and further away from the glass at the top. It would help lessen the effects of gravity.
 

Baer Charlton

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Distorts the perception though Jo.

Sew if you stitch enough, gravity is not a problem.

untill you get much older . . . then you learn that youth is wasted on the kids. :D
 

Sherry Lee

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Thanks to all for your input! It's not only invaluable receiving new concepts/theories, but it's great seeing some of them debated/discussed. I bet many of us learn something new with every topic - it's fascinating sharing "gray matter"!

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