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Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

Mounting a large number of items in one frame

beginnerframer

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Jul 15, 2020
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4
This is definitely a beginner question but my research has come up with a lot of conflicting information, none of it really useful. I have over a hundred media credentials along with some other mementos that I’d like to frame and hang on a fairly large wall. Since I’d like to put the layout together myself, this is going to be a DIY project.

What I’m looking for is some guidance on the best way to mount these (most plastic, some cardboard, some paper) before framing. What is the best background to purchase, and how should I mount them to the felt so that they stay in place when hung on the wall but are not completely ruined if I ever want to remove them?

Any advice here is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for your time!
 

wpfay

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Welcome to the G.
What you want to know would be covered in a book on object mounting. Member Jim Miller teaches object mounting and has written a couple books on it. He may be chiming in on this thread.
Each piece would have to be evaluated for the best way to achieve goals of display, ability to remove, and preservation. Choices include sewing, clear film strapping, overlays of clear film or sheer fabrics, the actual mounting mechanism that is on the object (pins, clutch backs, etc...), pinning, and magnetic to name a few.
My suggestion would be to arrange the layout and photograph it in detail. Take the project to a qualified framer and let them do the technical stuff. The time it takes to learn and master the techniques is a bit much for a single DIY project.
 

wvframer

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Yes, please post a picture. The learning curve for what you are describing is pretty steep. You will save a lot of time and frustration if you follow Wally's advice.

Any way that you do this project is going to involve cost, so purchasing the Object Mounting book at $30 or so that you can understand the techniques involved in mounting materials of multiple origin and materials in a single frame.

Another option is to photograph them, then take the items and your photograph to have a Photoshop or print professional lay them out on a single large photograph. The scanning and printing technology has advanced so much in the past decade that it is almost impossible to distinguish between a framed print and the original.

This also avoids the problem of plastic items degrading over time from the constant exposure to light. The savings in time and cost would be substantial.
 
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Ylva

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It truly depends on the things you are framing. Objects are harder to frame and definitely not a beginners DIY project. Unless you don’t care if it gets ruined. By using the incorrect mounting techniques, you might damage it forever.

There is not one method that would be usable for everything.

If you have some photos, that would help. Ditto on the find a professional framer. Preferably someone who is experienced in object mounting.
 
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Jim Miller

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... over a hundred media credentials along with some other mementos...(most plastic, some cardboard, some paper)...mount them to the felt ...not completely ruined if I ever want to remove them...
Not much to go on, here. As others have suggested, post a photo in order to get more-specific recommendations.

Items with pinbacks can be held by loops of fabric or Mylar.
Some items, such as buttons, might be sewn through their openings.
Paper and plastic items might be wrapped or strapped with Mylar.
Three-dimensional items might be held by two or more formed rods or Mylar straps.

General rules for preservation framing:
- No adhesives in direct contact with the items.
- Use only acid-free, chemically-stable, preservation grade materials inside the framing package.
- Most pressure-sensitive adhesives deteriorate and fail over time.
- No corrugated cardboard (boxboard) or Kraft paper in the frame.
- Use 97% or better UV-filtering glass or acrylic.

If you want to be able to open the frame and take any item out, then you'll probably need professional help; not only to build the frame to open/reclose, but to fabricate the uniquely-releasable mounts.

If the background has to be felt, make sure it's thrice-rinsed, ironed polyester felt. Glue it securely to a rigid conservation-grade backing board before mounting, using an adhesive that is chemically inert and stable for the long term. That is, starch paste, Klucel G, methyl cellulose, or perhaps acrylic gel medium. No rubber cement or spray adhesive would be acceptable.

As noted by others, this will not be an easy project. You probably could do it, but by the time you learn about the principles of mounting and preservation, and acquire all of the proper materials (and maybe a few tools), and then actually perform the tasks, you would most likely agree that an experienced, professional framer could have done better job at a lower cost. And if anything goes wrong in the process, you would at least have to re-do some mounts, and could damage some items.

Good luck.
 
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Framar

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Jul 24, 2001
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The appropriate mounting of these disparate items is a gargantuan task for a beginner.

I would go with the idea of photographing or scanning them and having them Photoshopped into whatever size poster you wish.

Then you could store the originals in appropriate archival types of storage boxes, folders, or sleeves (and keep them in the dark so they do not fade, also making sure your storage area is not damp).

Good luck and be sure to let us see the results of your project!
 

beginnerframer

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Jul 15, 2020
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Thanks, everyone, for the detailed and insightful responses!

Here's a photo (stolen from Google images, since I'm not home at the moment) of some press credentials. The majority of mine look similar to this. Most are plastic, some are paper/cardboard. Some are landscape, some are portrait. I have over 100 and am hoping to display them in one frame along the wall.
 

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beginnerframer

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So they are all “flat”, not objects?

How big are they overall? 100 in one frame is a lot
Yes, they're all flat. They vary in size, but average is 6" x 4". I was also considering "fanning" some as opposed to laying them all out completely separate without touching each other, since there are so many.
 
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artfolio

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For my money wvframer has nailed it.

I would guess that all those credentials are fairly small but they will not be identical sizes which makes a matt layout difficult. I would lay them out on a floor or table and photograph them then take the originals and a good-sized print of the layout to a printer or Graphics Designer. They would be able to photograph or scan the individual items in high definition and "stitch" them together anyway you like with a neutral or fancy background. This would be a fairly straight forward framing job with the added advantage of being easily replaceable if you keep a digital copy. I would then store the originals in an archival box out of the light.

My wife's exercise group had a composite group photograph made exactly this way and the handy thing was that they did not have to get together and pose for it - each person just provided a head and shoulders shot and the printer did the rest.
 

beginnerframer

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Jul 15, 2020
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For my money wvframer has nailed it.

I would guess that all those credentials are fairly small but they will not be identical sizes which makes a matt layout difficult. I would lay them out on a floor or table and photograph them then take the originals and a good-sized print of the layout to a printer or Graphics Designer. They would be able to photograph or scan the individual items in high definition and "stitch" them together anyway you like with a neutral or fancy background. This would be a fairly straight forward framing job with the added advantage of being easily replaceable if you keep a digital copy.

My wife's exercise group had a composite group photograph made exactly this way and the handy thing was that they did not have to get together and pose for it - each person just provided a head and shoulders shot and the printer did the rest.
I had never considered this, nor did I think it was an option. It sounds really cool, actually. Starting to think this is the way to go!
 

shayla

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Another great thing about framing prints is, you can have them made with pigment-based inks on good cotton paper. Although anything can fade over time, this ink will likely last better than whatever ink/dye/toner was used on the credentials. Also also (ha), if any of them were thermally-printed, they might be likely to darken over time. A good quality pigment-based print wouldn't have the same issue. Wherever it's framed, you'll want to use conservation grade glass, which comes with both clear (reflective) and museum (very few reflections). Your framer can show you samples.

Welcome to the Grumble! :)
 
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