Resolved Mounting 52" X 64" Warhol Cat Print to mat board, Which adhesive to use?

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Huckleberry

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Hello,

I plan to mount print onto rag mat and back with spliced foam core. I see several pastes on Lineco website:

*Pure methyl cellulose
*white neutral PH adhesive
*pure wheat starch
*PH neutral poly adhesive

Please let me know if you have (sucessfully) used these or others or would you use a spray adhesive, (although I would be concerned about even coverage.)

Thank you,
Huckleberry
 
What is the nature of the piece?
Is it a silkscreen from the 70's or a more recent reproduction?
If it has any value, no glue is appropriate. It should be hinged.
I would also be very wary of using any water based adhesive not knowing what the piece is made of. If it is a contemporary reproduction, it is likely ink-jet and the pigments are water soluble.
 
Hi, Huckleberry. Is this a poster or an original silkscreen.
If the former, I'd send it to someone with a big roller press.
If the latter, you might want to make sure that it's covered by the individual item limit on your insurance policy.
And if it is an original, how has it been displayed thus far? Also, please read Wally's note again. Good advice. :)
 
This is a recent reproduction, I am just looking into the scenario in which customer signs off on the mount and wants it done that way. Would like to hear from anyone who would admit to doing so?
 
This is a recent reproduction, I am just looking into the scenario in which customer signs off on the mount and wants it done that way. Would like to hear from anyone who would admit to doing so?
The info at the the bottom of the print says it's a McGaw reproduction from a silkscreen and is done on watercolor type paper stock.
 
The info at the the bottom of the print says it's a McGaw reproduction from a silkscreen and is done on watercolor type paper stock.
Okay. So, basically a really nice poster, and maybe, in pigment based ink?
Were you planning to mount it, because they were hoping to frame it with no mat?
Are you planning to use glazing in the frame, like acrylic?
 
What type of press do you use?
You can drymount it in sections on a Clamshell style press like a Seal 500T.
 
What is the nature of the piece?
Is it a silkscreen from the 70's or a more recent reproduction?
If it has any value, no glue is appropriate. It should be hinged.
I would also be very wary of using any water based adhesive not knowing what the piece is made of. If it is a contemporary reproduction, it is likely ink-jet and the pigments are water soluble.
Thank you for your input.
 
With a clamshell style heat press 52" at the narrowest measure means your press needs to be at least half that, 26" on its narrowest measure in order to heat and press completly to the center.
27" or 28" would be better, to have overlap from opposite sides.

For me, spray adhesive is just a hard "no". There are plenty of threads about that topic here on the Grumble.

Using standard "float mounting" methods such as the "hedgehog" mount would be my approach as well.
It's easy to get the materials, and relatively easy to learn to do.
I learned to use rice starch paste and mulberry paper hinges. Have never had a problem.
It takes time to learn how to mix it correctly, and practice the timing between when it's applied to the paper hinge and when it is ready to apply to the back of the artwork. Too fresh (wet) will cockle the art paper , too dry won't hold securely. There is a certain perfect consistency you can only find by trial and error and making note of success and failures.

Whatever you decide. Read, learn and practice, practice, practice the method until you are competent at the new skill.
Don't try to learn a new technique with a customers property.
 
With a clamshell style heat press 52" at the narrowest measure means your press needs to be at least half that, 26" on its narrowest measure in order to heat and press completly to the center.
27" or 28" would be better, to have overlap from opposite sides.
The 500T has a 34"x26.5" platen. I usually think of it as 32"x26"
As you can go past the 26.5" depth by a few inches, you can mount up to 56" x the length of your room.
It looks like the 350 allows a bit of extra space paste the platen as well, so you should be good if you go this route.
Very time consuming to take 3-4 presses on the small direction, but it is a known mounting method to most of us.
 
What is the nature of the piece?
Is it a silkscreen from the 70's or a more recent reproduction?
If it has any value, no glue is appropriate. It should be hinged.
I would also be very wary of using any water based adhesive not knowing what the piece is made of. If it is a contemporary reproduction, it is likely ink-jet and the pigments are water soluble.
Just a small addendum to ink-jet pigmentation: Some inks are dye-based & others pigment-based (technically, even dyes contain extremely small pigment particula, the caveat being particula size). The former are definitely water-soluble & the latter classified as water-insoluble.
 
My go-to method with big posters is to not use a conventional mat.
I would use a wide moulding (usually flat) and add a wide(ish) slip - maybe 30mm or so.
Cutting a huge mat is not without it's problems and for the most part a 'mat' is not necessary.
Also, if you add a mat you are increasing the glazed are substantially and in consequence the weight.
Here's the clever part...
The print can be hinged at the top to a board (foamcore, whatever) and maybe a few extra loose hinges
at the side/bottom to hold it in position and prevent it flopping about. A narrow strip (10mm?) of linen tape
is laid along the back of the slip to raise it slightly so the slip does not restrict any movement in the print. The
slip fits under the glazing.

The use of a wide frame makes it a stronger construction where you can better engineer a hanging system such as
a French Cleat. Also, it will not flex as much as a narrow frame - the better to protect the glazing. The slip can be painted
to blend with the outer frame, but it's a good idea in this case to raise the glass away from the slip to prevent weird optical
effects.

** Having said all that it might go wavy. That's always a pitfall with large sheets of paper. Drymounting is maybe preferable in
the right circumstances. But you would have to source a HUGE board and have a HUGE press.

Here is a rough diagram...

raisedslipmat001.jpg
 
..... In cases where the matted 'look' is desirable then I tend toward adding a wide painted liner.
The glazing does not cover this and the art is spaced from the glass. This effectively reduces the
glass acreage (and weight) by a large amount.

!cid_6331FB8D-7E64-4122-AF78-AC20527CD9DB@home.jpg
 
Thank you everyone for your input.
Beautiful painted liner!
I'm pretty sure I will not use adhesive and don't have a large enough press for a mount even if I could have found large enough foam core. I should have mentioned at the start that I'm using only a wide frame and acrylic, there was never a plan for a mat, just an oversize mat behind art to place over 2 pieces of 1/2" foam core that I am going to try to splice at a perfect 45 degree bevel and tape at the back.
I would sure like to hear from anyone who has created a backing in this way.
 
Why not cover a substrate with fabric? Make it a 'toothy' fabric and you would be able to do a direct contact overlay, no attachments needed if done right.
The only concern is abrasion and the ink used as in this case, the plexiglass would be right on top of the print
 
Thank you everyone for your input.
Beautiful painted liner!
I'm pretty sure I will not use adhesive and don't have a large enough press for a mount even if I could have found large enough foam core. I should have mentioned at the start that I'm using only a wide frame and acrylic, there was never a plan for a mat, just an oversize mat behind art to place over 2 pieces of 1/2" foam core that I am going to try to splice at a perfect 45 degree bevel and tape at the back.
I would sure like to hear from anyone who has created a backing in this way.
Huckleberry, though my skill-set isn't in framing per se, I did read somewhere relatively recently that when museum curators require large rigid backing material for super-large canvas exhibits, they splice together (actually glue-together) 2 coroplast sheetings, with each sheet's "grain" criss-crossing the other for added rigidity. Coroplast has no negative attributes in framing (except that very little actually sticks to it, adhesive-/tape-/hinge-wise --- it tacks though quite well). It might serve you better in this case than foamcore. Just a suggestion.
 
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