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Main reason of spacing

Ylva

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Discussion going on elsewhere.

What is your main reason to space the glass away from the art.

I always tell my customer that it might become stuck to the glass, which is my main reason. Easy and quick to educate and for everyone to understand.

I have heard reasons like condensation and off-gassing. Wouldn’t that still happen wherever the glass is, right on top of art or spaced?
 

neilframer

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You are correct about possible off-gassing and condensation.
The reason for an air space is that off-gassing and condensation may still occur but, if the glass isn't touching the artwork hopefully all you might get is the residue on the inside of the glass and it won't touch and dry and stick to the artwork.
The glass may get foggy on the inside eventually but that can be cleaned.
Plexiglass is much less prone to condensation because it doesn't transfer temperature differences the way that glass does.
 
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Framar

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Some paperborne art, be it a photograph or a print on high-gloss paper, will easily stick to the glass if there are temperature and therefore humidity fluctuations, causing condensation on the inside of the glass. I have seen a lot of artwork ruined by being stuck fast to the glass. Even needleart can mildew over time with no airspace inside the frame.
 

Paul Cascio

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To add to what has been said, should that glass ever break, the photos are destroyed. I remember as a kid, my grandparents had glossy B&W photos, in brass hinged frames, sitting on a table next to the bowl of rubber grapes (Italian -- it was mandatory to have a bowl of rubber grapes back then. Plastic slip-covers too.) The photos were stuck to the glass as a result of humidity.
 

Ylva

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To add to what has been said, should that glass ever break, the photos are destroyed. I remember as a kid, my grandparents had glossy B&W photos, in brass hinged frames, sitting on a table next to the bowl of rubber grapes (Italian -- it was mandatory to have a bowl of rubber grapes back then. Plastic slip-covers too.) The photos were stuck to the glass as a result of humidity.
Must have been a European thing, I remember the fake grapes and other fruit. They didn’t even pretend to look real...

I have many old family photos which were damaged that way. Even if the glass doesn’t break, you get those weird areas where they are clearly stuck.
 
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Larry Peterson

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Greg Fremstad

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Paper borne art will expand/contract with changes in humidity inside the frame. If the art is against the glass, the edges will see humidity changes long before the center area of the art. This difference in expansion/contraction will be evident in buckling. This is the same reason one should never put ANY pressure against the backing during fitting as it will hinder the free expansion/contraction of the art. Spacers will provide airspace to maintain even humidity across the face of the art.

Tape sealing the glass-art-backing package before putting it in the frame will maintain constant humidity levels as well as prevent introduction of dust, wood fibers, gold/silver leaf, and critters.
 
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