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Question Lucid Lines Escher artwork on glass in metal frame

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Rozmataz

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
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Jun 13, 2002
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Fingerlakes Region of NYS
I have a weird frame here. It is Escher self portrait artwork on the backside of glass (not framer's quality) in a metal frame - that has no apparent way of opening to reframe. I am worried about breaking the glass. The line is originally from a company called Lucid Lines in Culver City CA. Anyone have any suggestions how to get the glass out of the frame?
 

Gilder

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Aug 18, 2009
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953
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Indianapolis
Maybe you shouldn't take such a risk. I would call the customer and ask them to stop by and
see if we can open it.
 

Rozmataz

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I am holding the customer's check "just in case"..... I will most likely take a "Pasadena" on this project...
 

Rob Markoff

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San Diego, CA USA
Wow - that brings back memories. When I was framing in Los Angeles, I was a Lucid Lines dealer in the early 70's and I am very familiar with the frame you are discussing.

Lucid lines had two types of frames; a single piece of metal that was notched in three corners and folded around the "art" and joined at the fourth by a pressed piece of "L" metal, or 4 pieces of mitered moulding that were all joined at the corners using a pneumatic press that pushed the stamped "one way" steel fasteners in the corners. They were NEVER intended to come apart :(

Does yours have the glass art in the front channel and a piece of cardboard in the back so the art is "floating" off the back, or is yours an "open back" and you can see right through the art to the wall?

We did take them apart many times when the frame got damaged or the client wanted to "upgrade". The stamped corners do not go all the way up to the channel where the glass is. We used a cut off wheel on a Dremel tool to cut through the stamped corners- being careful not to get the frame/glass too hot. You only have to do this on two corners, then you can slide the glass out.

If yours has the cardboard backing, pull it out (you can slice through it being careful not to scratch the glass on the other side - but there is an air gap). When it is removed, you can get a better view of the stampings holding the corners together.

Please be sure you and your customers understands that it is not without risk - but it can be done.
 

Rozmataz

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OMG Rob... that is incredible.... The glass is in a channel at the face, and the board in a channel towards the back so it is indeed floating!! The corners all have the mitred edges with no evidence to detach!! I do not have a Dremel tool and honestly, after what you just shared - I definitely am going to take the "California" route: Pasadena on this project!!! (The customer did sign off on the risk of the glass/artwork breaking)
 
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Pat Murphey

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Nov 16, 2002
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Is the frame amenable to just adding a frame around the original frame. You could rip a wider rabbet, if necessary.
 

Rozmataz

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Thanks for the input... I have contacted the customer and am returning it to her. I do not have the equipment to do(risk) it properly. The thought was making me nervous, so now I can breathe again.
 

Jeff Rodier

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You can also add a filet to add width to a frame if you don't want to rip the moulding.
 

caliartistcarrie111

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Feb 14, 2021
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Orange County
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Artist, purveyor of interior design
Wow - that brings back memories. When I was framing in Los Angeles, I was a Lucid Lines dealer in the early 70's and I am very familiar with the frame you are discussing.

Lucid lines had two types of frames; a single piece of metal that was notched in three corners and folded around the "art" and joined at the fourth by a pressed piece of "L" metal, or 4 pieces of mitered moulding that were all joined at the corners using a pneumatic press that pushed the stamped "one way" steel fasteners in the corners. They were NEVER intended to come apart :(

Does yours have the glass art in the front channel and a piece of cardboard in the back so the art is "floating" off the back, or is yours an "open back" and you can see right through the art to the wall?

We did take them apart many times when the frame got damaged or the client wanted to "upgrade". The stamped corners do not go all the way up to the channel where the glass is. We used a cut off wheel on a Dremel tool to cut through the stamped corners- being careful not to get the frame/glass too hot. You only have to do this on two corners, then you can slide the glass out.

If yours has the cardboard backing, pull it out (you can slice through it being careful not to scratch the glass on the other side - but there is an air gap). When it is removed, you can get a better view of the stampings holding the corners together.

Please be sure you and your customers understands that it is not without risk - but it can be done.
Hello, PFG, I am a designer of high end custom framing goddess ☺️ this is a long shot considering your post is from 6 years ago but I'm asking on behalf of my friends, if you have more information on Lucid Lines as a product line. We all are here in OC, California and they have two pieces from that line and they would love more information on their pieces! Thank you!
 
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Ylva

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Hello, PFG, I am a designer of high end custom framing goddess ☺️ this is a long shot considering your post is from 6 years ago but I'm asking on behalf of my friends, if you have more information on Lucid Lines as a product line. We all are here in OC, California and they have two pieces from that line and they would love more information on their pieces! Thank you!
Welcome to the G
The PFG is just an abbreviation for 'picture framing god' which only refers to the amount of posts someone makes.

Rob is not a regular visitor here anymore unfortunately, so I don't expect any answers on this.
 

Lisa Jean

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Wow - that brings back memories. When I was framing in Los Angeles, I was a Lucid Lines dealer in the early 70's and I am very familiar with the frame you are discussing.

Lucid lines had two types of frames; a single piece of metal that was notched in three corners and folded around the "art" and joined at the fourth by a pressed piece of "L" metal, or 4 pieces of mitered moulding that were all joined at the corners using a pneumatic press that pushed the stamped "one way" steel fasteners in the corners. They were NEVER intended to come apart :(

Does yours have the glass art in the front channel and a piece of cardboard in the back so the art is "floating" off the back, or is yours an "open back" and you can see right through the art to t
Wow - that brings back memories. When I was framing in Los Angeles, I was a Lucid Lines dealer in the early 70's and I am very familiar with the frame you are discussing.

Lucid lines had two types of frames; a single piece of metal that was notched in three corners and folded around the "art" and joined at the fourth by a pressed piece of "L" metal, or 4 pieces of mitered moulding that were all joined at the corners using a pneumatic press that pushed the stamped "one way" steel fasteners in the corners. They were NEVER intended to come apart :(

Does yours have the glass art in the front channel and a piece of cardboard in the back so the art is "floating" off the back, or is yours an "open back" and you can see right through the art to the wall?

We did take them apart many times when the frame got damaged or the client wanted to "upgrade". The stamped corners do not go all the way up to the channel where the glass is. We used a cut off wheel on a Dremel tool to cut through the stamped corners- being careful not to get the frame/glass too hot. You only have to do this on two corners, then you can slide the glass out.

If yours has the cardboard backing, pull it out (you can slice through it being careful not to scratch the glass on the other side - but there is an air gap). When it is removed, you can get a better view of the stampings holding the corners together.

Please be sure you and your customers understands that it is not without risk - but it can be done.
he wall?

We did take them apart many times when the frame got damaged or the client wanted to "upgrade". The stamped corners do not go all the way up to the channel where the glass is. We used a cut off wheel on a Dremel tool to cut through the stamped corners- being careful not to get the frame/glass too hot. You only have to do this on two corners, then you can slide the glass out.

If yours has the cardboard backing, pull it out (you can slice through it being careful not to scratch the glass on the other side - but there is an air gap). When it is removed, you can get a better view of the stampings holding the corners together.

Please be sure you and your customers understands that it is not without risk - but it can be done.

Hi Rob
I just found a picture from the same company you worked for and wondering if you had any information about it.
It is a theater etched on glass "Grand"
Any help would be appreciated.
Thank you,
Lisa
 

Shayla

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Welcome to the G
The PFG is just an abbreviation for 'picture framing god' which only refers to the amount of posts someone makes.

Rob is not a regular visitor here anymore unfortunately, so I don't expect any answers on this.
Would these framers be able to find Rob in a FB framing group?
 

David Waldmann

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