Joining moulding to canvas float frame

Mary Beth van der Horst

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jan 28, 2020
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Myrtle Beach, SC
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Mary Beth's Custom Framing Studio
I didn't realize the trouble I was getting into with this one...

A customer asked for a large gold frame to become a canvas float. Ok... we picked out a float frame to go with it, and I ordered them joined from LJ. Any time I've ever gotten a stacked frame from them, they size it and join them together for me. But not this time. I get two separate frames. Now I'm looking at them like... wait, I can't just offset screw these together. I need to think this out, and carefully because it's freaking huge and I can't afford to reorder this frame if I mess up and crack it or something.

The outer frame is lj733235
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The inner frame is LJ589112
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I don't have a brad nailer, but I could probably get one for this project if it's the only option. I thought maybe shooting through the top inside of the float frame into the side of the gold rabbet may be the safest option, but I'm also unsure of how easily the cherry hardwood would take fine nails like that.

Alternatively, I could painstakingly predrill and screw them together with L-brackets and hope that my 1/4" screws don't break through the side walls of the floater?

Anyone have thoughts they are willing to share?


I'll probably need to add some timber to the top rail to hang a cleat off of too... The inner dimensions of the float frame are 73" x 49" :help:
 
Put the two together and draw a pencil line on the outside of the float frame where the foot of the outer frame meets it.

Insert long shank screw eyes just outside the line, so when put back together they don't quite touch the outer frame.

Put screws through the eyesIMG_1995.jpg into the foot of the outer frame.

Predrill the holes for both. Use a wrap of masking tape on the bit so you don't drill through the floater,
 
Put the two together and draw a pencil line on the outside of the float frame where the foot of the outer frame meets it.

Insert long shank screw eyes just outside the line, so when put back together they don't quite touch the outer frame.

Put screws through the eyesView attachment 49277 into the foot of the outer frame.

Predrill the holes for both. Use a wrap of masking tape on the bit so you don't drill through the floater,
Is there any reason screw eyes would be preferable to something like this?
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Lumberyards have trim moulding than is cut like a right triangle. You could glue that to whichever frame and then either glue the two together or use small tacks.
 
I just happened to think- quarter round moulding would give you a little more bulk to nail through if you went that route,
 
Is there any reason screw eyes would be preferable to something like this?
View attachment 49278
Technically, no, but the challenge of the 1/4" thick floater and pan head screws is eased a bit, and the screw eye system is certainly less visible.
You pretty much have to use a #6 pan head screw and in 3/16" of wood, you won't get much bite from the threads. The narrower screw eye will get much better hold on the floater in the space allowed.
Using the long shank screw eye will allow you to get the screw through the eye into fairly solid wood, not too close to the edge of the outer frame. Tensioning that screw will also seat the inner frame nicely into the rebate of the outer frame.
 
Another method: take apart a double D-ring hanger, open it up, flatten it, then form it so one hole lines up with the bottom of the floater, and the other lines up with the bottom of the outer frame. Use two per side. The weakness of this is the small amount of metal holding everything together, but if you use enough, it should work.
 
If you do Wally's screw eye method, be careful to drill very precise pilot holes for inserting the screw eyes... not only for depth so they don't poke thru to the inside of the floater, but also for diameter because that floater is maple, and if the pilot hole is too small it could be difficult to twist in the screw eyes without breaking them as they are made of fairly soft steel. Otherwise, this method should work well.
:cool: Rick

Just a thought: I assume you discussed with the customer the fact that the gold frame will appear to be floated away from the wall due to the extra depth of the floater. Some people get a bit wonky about that.
 
Ok, only because I loath screw eyes, couldn't see getting my pilot holes as precise as they would need to be, and because I kept imagining screwing through the moulding with them as well, I went with my little L-brackets. I used the slot side against the hardwood float frame, drilled a pilot hole only 3/16" deep, used a 3/8" fine thread screw with 2 washers to space it out, and then before tightening it, I screwed the small hole to the big frame with a wider threaded screw. That way it could adjust without pulling on the screw and I could then tighten the first screw to hold better. Ended up putting 4-5 on each side and it seems pretty heckin sturdy. Was putting this off long enough to think about it but I feel like I found the best solution with the materials I had.

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Ok, only because I loath screw eyes,
LOL! Me too, especially for their intended purpose.
That goes a long way to explain why I have a boxes of 1000 of each size and shaft length that date back to the mid 70's...
I do use them in this application, and installing strip moulding when I want to avoid nail holes that show. Oh, and for those super skinny frames that even an infinity hanger is too big for.
 
Crawling along with this project... I finally found a good sized piece of wood to glue/screw to the main frame to hold a cleat. I also ended up with 3-30" cleats because that's the only size my supplier had in stock. How many of these things sound adequate to you guys? One across the top should be sufficient based on their poundage rating of 300lbs... but it has been suggested to install cleats on both the top and the bottom. Or should I go triple overkill and do two on top and one on the bottom? Really hoping they don't call me back to hang this one if I do multiples. They will hopefully find/use their own handyman.
 
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