• Welcome! You will have to REGISTER a free account, before you can access the system. If you already registered, please LOG IN. (top right)
    If you can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it. If you have questions, feel free to click the CONTACT US link at the bottom of this page.

It's getting spooky in here!

FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

GreyDrakkon

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
619
Location
The frozen wastelands of Iowa.
Business
The Frame Shop
I'm originally from New England so Halloween is a big thing for me, I'm absolutely baffled by the lack of engagement in the Midwest about it, except that autumn here is absolutely pathetic. (If you're lucky you get a week of somewhat nice leaves, then a wind storm comes along and rips them all off and then it's dreary until spring) Still, I can't help myself, so I decorate the shop's windows with Halloween stuff. I've found some antique prints that are pretty fun, the first one is from some kind of short story about children chasing a bagpiper Scot with turnip jack o' lanterns (they were what was used before pumpkins) which I just find hysterical. The second piece is a musical booklet from some show, unfortunately the music itself is for a song called "When the Cows Come Home" but the cover art is wonderful.
 

Attachments

  • HalloweenScotSmaller.jpg
    HalloweenScotSmaller.jpg
    623.1 KB · Views: 29
  • JackOLanternMusicBookletSmaller.jpg
    JackOLanternMusicBookletSmaller.jpg
    180.6 KB · Views: 29

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
16,360
Location
Gloucester, MA
They're both awesome!
I didn't realize that the Midwest wasn't so much into it. It is such a big thing here indeed. We loved when the kids were little and usually went somewhere where whole streest were decorated. There is one particular street in a city nearby that is known for Halloween (and no, it is not Salem) and the whole neighborhood plans a year in advance. It is absolutely wonderful and magical and creepy
 
Rian Fabrication Services  www.rianfabrication.com

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,817
Location
Wilkes-Barre, PA
When I was a wee young lad, we did Halloween big in the Chicago Burbs. A company I worked for exiled me from their corporate headquarters in Chicago to Fort Dodge Iowa for 3 years. I seem to recall both the kiddies and the alcohol fueled adults having a good time. Of course in Fort Dodge Iowa any excuse for a good time is a good excuse for good time.
 

artfolio

SGF, Supreme Grumble Framer
Joined
Feb 16, 2007
Messages
2,797
Location
Perth Western Australia
Here in Australia it is pretty well ignored, mainly, I suspect, because the times when kids could safely go out doorknocking strangers ended a long time ago.
 

alacrity8

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Sep 22, 2009
Messages
941
Location
Albany, NY
In the states, now, the kids are usually accompanied by an adult on their rounds in the daylight.
I do not understand.
 

Nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
938
Location
Comox, BC, Canada
Oh, boy I grew up in a pretty safe place.
A gang of 6+ kids ages from 5 to young teens would scour the neighborhood as far as we could walk in every direction.
There were kids EVERYWHERE in costumes.
If the weather was bad, then Mom would drive us to a more populated area so we could fill our bags and she could take us home when we got soaked by rain or snow.
NOTHING gets in my way when CANDY is involved! :D

The grade school was decorated and there were games and costumes.
Giant pumpkins and hay bale or corn mazes at the local farms.
It was so much fun!

Where I live now, there are barely a handful of kids showing up on Halloween night.

I don't have goblins er..children of my own, so don't know what it's like nowadays.

For a while about 10 years ago and more, I was really into carving pumpkins.
I got pretty good at it.
If I can dig up some old photos I'll post them.
 

GreyDrakkon

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Forum Donor
Thread starter
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
619
Location
The frozen wastelands of Iowa.
Business
The Frame Shop
Going to see if this works, I made a gif of the different layers going onto the piece, thought it turned out pretty good. I'm leaving it attached since the animation can be irritating to see constantly going.

So many layers! I'm really pleased that I found a mat that matches the inside of the diner so well, and the pinstripe running along the ceiling is matched perfectly by a few strands of brassy looking thread sewn onto it (I can't believe I hadn't thought of doing that ages ago instead of painting a line, but it took seeing it in a framing magazine to get me to realize it could be done). Then a fillet on the inside of an oil rubbed bronze mat, a small pewter/silver frame on the inside of a Larson-Juhl we had left over from a customer's order, there were some flaws in it which I happily incorporated into the piece. LovecraftPrintAnimation.gif

LovecraftPrint.gif
 
Rian Fabrication Services  www.rianfabrication.com

Nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
938
Location
Comox, BC, Canada
That looks fantastic!

The thread technique is interesting. How do you keep it in place?
It's hard to see but looks like small holes in the corners where the threads meet.

I really like the frame styling, works well with the 1950's diner theme of the artwork.

That gif is cool too. :thumbsup:
 

GreyDrakkon

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Forum Donor
Thread starter
Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
619
Location
The frozen wastelands of Iowa.
Business
The Frame Shop
The thread technique is interesting. How do you keep it in place?
It's hard to see but looks like small holes in the corners where the threads meet.
Yep, the thread is kept in place with four small holes, and you basically sew them into place by going over/under until you've gone all the way around, then tie it off in the back. If it's a giant piece, I'd do one loop per a side just to keep the thread from tangling. Once it's in place, I go on the back side and shove the punctured mat with a bone folder to press it back out which minimizes the holes. I really love this technique because the thread lays on top of the mat, which means the texture of the mat doesn't matter nearly as much as when you're attempting to get a straight looking line on a lumpy surface. Plus there's no worry about spattering the mat!
 
LifeSaver Cloud from LifeSaver Software, Inc.
Top