HUGE vintage posters on linen

WyomingArtFrame

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I've posted about this before without much luck. Most of these I can get board for, except one is 79x50. Can I stretch them??? He says he doesn't want glazing to keep the cost down, but I tried to explain that if I have to stretch them that will probably cost as much if not more than acrylic. This is a $15,000 order and I need the money. How do I mount these??? One is 79x50 and I can't even get board that big! Please help.
 
We would never stretch and always glaze with acrylic. We build a 'platform' with strainer stock/ACM/polyflute etc, and hinge the linen-backed poster with linen/canvas strips and BEVA; wrapping the strips around to the back of the strainer platform and stapling to the the bars.

We do not use spacers on linen-backed posters that large (yeah, yeah, I know, micro-abrasion from vibrations, etc, but even 1/4" acrylic would probably still 'sag' and contact the poster as it got closer to the center). We usually frame for the real-world. .

Also keep in mind that acrylic is subject to thermal expansion/contraction so on projects with very large acrylic sheets in certain climates/situations it may be prudent to build in a larger rabbet width to head off possible issues due to extreme temperature shifts from power outages...
 
Ditto. I don't bother with spacers at that size either.
These posters are not meant to be stretched. You might actually cause damage if you try that (paper will crack). They were linen backed to give them stability

For backing, I'd use coroplast, cross fluted. You can splice it so the seams are not right on top of each other. I am not sure if it comes larger than 48x96
 
If archival properties are not a concern you can very often find MDF or better yet ultralight MDF in 60" widths. These products are usually not available in Home Depot types of businesses but are more often found in lumber yards that supply products to home builders and cabinet manufacturers. I also thought at some point in time you could find 1/2" thick gator board in 60" widths.
 
you can also use Aluminum substrate 3mm (Dibond) as the backing. It comes that size from a sign shop, as does Fluted Polypropylene (coroplast). But what you are framing is a piece on paper, not on canvas. You must use some kind of glazing.
 
I got yet another job in this week from someone having to reframe an L.E. print that was matted and framed but had no glazing, measuring 36"x30".
They usually say something like, "I didn't want the glass to interfere or obstruct my view", "It's cheaper without glass", or other reasons.

These pieces always are damaged in some way.
-Rippled or warped because of exposure to humidity changes.
-Badly faded
-Bug droppings, spider webs, pet hairs, and dust all over them.
-Marks from accidental or irresponsible contact.
-Sometimes even splashes and stains from food or drink

What is the cost savings of not glazing compared to possibly ruining or devaluing an expensive or irreplaceable piece, and also having to pay to have it restored or replaced, and re-framed years from now?
The choice is ultimately up to the customer.
As long as you make them aware of the risks, what happens to the piece while in their posession is out of your control.
 
I've posted about this before without much luck. Most of these I can get board for, except one is 79x50. Can I stretch them??? He says he doesn't want glazing to keep the cost down, but I tried to explain that if I have to stretch them that will probably cost as much if not more than acrylic. This is a $15,000 order and I need the money. How do I mount these??? One is 79x50 and I can't even get board that big! Please help.
Both foam board and Gator board is avail in 60"x120" - I have a couple of sheets in my store of each - the Gator is avail in white and black and in 6mm and 12ish mm(1/2").
These products along with coroplast are available from NON framing vendors - I buy mine from Allied Plastics (much more economical than LJ)

Your client is all about the cost - so these are obviously not 'museum quality' - you may consider mounting them to one of the boards above via a sign or map shop, then frame as you see fit.
 
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