• Welcome! You will have to REGISTER a free account, before you can access the system. If you already registered, please LOG IN. (top right)
    If you can't remember your password, CLICK HERE to reset it. If you have questions, feel free to click the CONTACT US link at the bottom of this page.
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

how do you store your sticks?

srbentley65

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Feb 3, 2020
Messages
8
What do people use to store their 10ft sticks of moulding. I'm picturing something mounted on the walls? I'm about to jump on ULINE's site and see but thought the experienced folks would know better. Any suggestions on either is appreciated.
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
May 19, 2000
Messages
17,925
I have used white plastic rain gutters both horizontally and nearly vertical. My last shop had sixty 10 ft. gutters screwed to the wall horizontally. Cheap, easy to keep track of inventory, and the soft plastic does not harm the mounding finishes. If I can find a photo I'll post it.
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,459
Semi-vertically in a 10' high rack. angle of the rack is probably 75-80 degrees. It will also depend on how much inventory you have. I have about 20000 ft of moulding in 4 8' wide, 10' tall racks. Boxes are stored in a rack horizontally. Folk with less inventory might go with horizontal racks but this might not be efficient for large amounts of moulding.

This shows one of my racks. You can't see it well, but there is another rack on the other side of the beam. That 2x4 strap at the top connects the two racks and holds it in place.

 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,687
Vertically. Hundreds of sticks. Luckily, when I built the workshop, not thinking it would become a frame shop, I built ten-foot walls. Horizontally would not work.
 

i-FRAMER

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 27, 2011
Messages
837
I tried horizontally, and di not like it. Lucky for us we have 4m high roof, so can easily sore our lengths vertically.
But if height is an issue, then horizontally is the go
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

shayla

WOW Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Apr 5, 2008
Messages
31,410
Horizontally, in a giant, metal grid thing. It's attached to ceiling and floor, and is around 20 long, and 7' high. Each square opening is about 6" wide by 9' long. When we bought the shop, Hubby cut up a whole bunch of white foam core to line them. We have a roll of 6" wide 'tube plastic', that we reel off and knot on one end. Put extra length and scraps in those prior to storing (in theory).
 

cvm

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
7,746
We have a horizontal rack with an 8'x10' footprint that holds 15,000+ ft of moulding.
 

Dirk

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
566
Horizontally, in a giant, metal grid thing. It's attached to ceiling and floor, and is around 20 long, and 7' high. Each square opening is about 6" wide by 9' long. When we bought the shop, Hubby cut up a whole bunch of white foam core to line them. We have a roll of 6" wide 'tube plastic', that we reel off and knot on one end. Put extra length and scraps in those prior to storing (in theory).
Former owner built the rack. It's made from 6x6 welded wire panels - the stuff used in concrete slabs and sometimes for livestock fencing. Panels are four feet wide and twelve feet long. Rack is three panels deep, about two, five, and eight feet from the wall. Panels are supported at the bottom on 2x4 frames about two feet tall, and supported at the top with heavy wire attached to the ceiling joists. Wire in the panels is galvanized, and the zinc coating isn't exactly gentle on moulding. Former owner had 1/4 plywood in the bottoms of several of the "slots", but much of the moulding suffered damage. We took foam core and scored twice on one side, folding it into a U shape, and used a jig to tape two pieces together on both sides, making an 80 inch trough.
 
Register for the picture framer's grumble

cvm

PFG, Picture Framing God
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
7,746
Pic? Pic Vic? Please?
About a dozen-or-so years ago I called Jeff Rodier and we did a quick walk-through of how to build my rack. IIRC, at the time it cost less than $150 and I did almost the whole thing myself in about 4 hours. I only needed the help of one person for about 30 minutes.

I did a search, and here is what Jeff wrote on The G about this rack system:

 

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
583
I just moved my workshop to a new building over the last couple of weeks.
Literally 20 feet from the old place :rolleyes: ,but more room.

I changed from horizontal to vertical storage for length moulding, mix of horizontal and vertical for shorter pieces (most of which will be purged soon).

I found it too awkward to get at sticks buried under the horizontally stacked piles.
Now I have room to separate the mouldings for easier identification and retrieval.

No fancy rack at the moment.
I drilled 3/8" holes about 8" apart in a length of canvas stretcher material, screwed that to the wall with about 1" space.
Then I poked the nails through the holes in my stretcher support, and just drove some 16" nails into the 1/2" plywood wall.
The nails will get padding added next time I'm in the shop.

For short pieces worth keeping, I have a couple of slat wall panels with padded metal brackets.
(The kind you see in many retail stores)

Love reading (and seeing) other people's solutions.
I will borrow some of these more well thought out ideas in the future.
Thanks for the great thread idea srbently65 :thumbsup:
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
Vic, I did not see that before. Jeff always had good ideas when it came to handling quantities.
I miss him. Wondering what happened to him? I know there were some health problems.
He gave me some very solid advice over the years
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
I have used white plastic rain gutters both horizontally and nearly vertical. My last shop had sixty 10 ft. gutters screwed to the wall horizontally. Cheap, easy to keep track of inventory, and the soft plastic does not harm the mounding finishes. If I can find a photo I'll post it.
Jim, did you find a photo? I have one wall where I can hang something, right above my saws. This seems to be the most appealing solution for that.
Interested in attachment and how to!
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
May 19, 2000
Messages
17,925
Jim, did you find a photo? I have one wall where I can hang something, right above my saws. This seems to be the most appealing solution for that.
Interested in attachment and how to!
Yes, here's one. Floor to ceiling, sixty 10-foot long gutters are screwed to the wall. Numbering them makes it easy to index your inventory locations. I like that this method shows everything - easy access to the whole length of storage. It's easy to keep clean, no dark corners, and nothing gets lost under or behind other things.

Also, a drawing below shows how the gutters can be used in a moveable rack to store mouldings vertically. This is how I did it in my first location, and it worked out well. If you build a rack with wheels, use steel wheels, because the plastic or rubber wheels develop flat spots over time and will no longer roll. If this idea appeals to you, I can probably find one with dimensions and more details. I think I still have drawings for a similar rack design using the gutters horizontally, too. Personally, I prefer horizontal storage with full-length support, because it avoids warping, and short pieces are easier to deal with.
Photo-Mldg-Horiz Gutters on Wall.jpg Photo-Mldg Rack Vert Gutters.jpg
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
I need to add horizontal storage, and have space above my saws.
Did you just screw every so many inches, into the all?
Is it supported in any other way?

I had the idea of doing plastic tubes, secure them with “plumbers tape” to the wall in a few spots. But I like the more open look a lot better!
 
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
May 19, 2000
Messages
17,925
Ylva,
There are 4 screws holding each gutter, set into anchors in the sheetrock. That arrangement has provided adequate support for all the mouldings I could cram into them. Note that if you're storing 1" wide moulding, you might get half a box or more into a gutter, but if it's 3" or 4" wide wood moulding, you probably could only get three or four sticks in the gutter. Anyway, the weight in each gutter probably would never require more support than four well-anchored screws into the wall.
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
So you’d just drill a hole in the gutter and attach to wall? It wouldn’t get heavy, I just need to separate and easily see what I have. My box moulding is on sturdy shelves, I just want to separate some of the moulding where I never have more than 2-3 sticks at a time.
 

Jim Miller

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
May 19, 2000
Messages
17,925
So you’d just drill a hole in the gutter and attach to wall? It wouldn’t get heavy...
That should work. The photo above shows that just the screws are used, but I once bought some plastic gutters that needed to have washers (I used fender washers) under the screw heads to prevent them breaking through the plastic.
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
That should work. The photo above shows that just the screws are used, but I once bought some plastic gutters that needed to have washers (I used fender washers) under the screw heads to prevent them breaking through the plastic.
That makes sense. I see a trip to one of the home improvement stores in my very near future. I like how it does t take up much space and all is visible.
 

Larry Peterson

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Resource Provider
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
8,459
I took some photos of all my moulding storage, a little bit of all the methods.

We will start with one of my 4 vertical racks and some box storage in front.

moulding1.jpg

Another vertical rack
moulding4.jpg

Racks 3 and 4. The boxes in front are partial sticks.

moulding2.jpg

Moulding ordered via UPS/FedEx where it was shipped cut in half. The numbers you see here and in a later photo are my website moulding #s.
moulding3.jpg

Shorts. I sell a lot of small frames; 3x5 and up so shorts are never gotten rid of until I discontinue a moulding. Each of the tubes are 30" deep. There is a carpet store in the warehouse I'm in so I can have all the carpet tubes I would ever need.

moulding5.jpg

More boxed mouldings and thinner mouldings stored in 10' carpet tubes
moulding6.jpg
 
Register for the picture framer's grumble

Bob Carter

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jun 16, 2000
Messages
14,411
A couple of things pretty consistent is that most framers are packrats and incredibly messy.
If anyone ever visited Markoff's shop, his backrooms were as neat as most front shops. Can't remember is moulding storage but he had a lot and it was incredibly well organized
maybe there are pics somewhere
He had doors on all the under table storage areas
everytime i visited his shops I always learned something really useful
 

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
583
Yes to all of it :D
I really enjoy seeing other framers' work areas. It makes me both envious of the space others have, and joyful that I am not the only messy one!
I recently got to move to a new shop space. I took the opportunity to make some changes to my moulding storage. Here's some before and after shots. (Note, I am still working on setting up the new shop. It's a work in progress.)

Old chop saw area: cluttered and cramped, length sticks on left are piled up, hard to get at and unorganized, short sticks on right the same. Mess under saw.
03.jpg

Old joiner area: difficult to access and unorganized mouldings, clutter everywhere.
06.jpg

NEW saw area: Clean and bright, shelves for organizing tools etc, NO CLUTTER!
new02.jpg

NEW storage: Changing to upright storage for long sticks, medium lengths and shorts will be on padded shelving arms on slat wall.
(Punching bag at left for when things don't go right :icon45:)
new03.jpg

New joiner area: and small workbench, and canvas stretcher/strainer storage.
new01.jpg

This space has plenty of room for expansion. That's why I like to see others spaces, so I can borrow ideas.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
583
I hear ya' Ylva.
I'm going to try implementing a numbering system as some others have mentioned.
I do try to keep all the sticks in plastic (or wrap), labeled with the item order number.
What I need to develop is a better system to know exactly where I have put each item.
That's why I moved to a vertical system with more slots, to hopefully make a system of tracking easier.
Although...I am really liking the gutter system posted by Jim.
At least now I have the space I need to try different arrangements.
 

Ylva

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
15,197
One thing I have done, is mark my samples. I wrap a rubber band on the samples if I have a full stick I’m stock. 2 bands for 2 sticks.
The storage itself is indeed a different matter. I need to organize it better for sure.

I also now carry certain moulding in box quantity. I have some limited space for that.
 
FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

wvframer

Humble Picture Framer
Forum Support Team
Forum Donor
Joined
Oct 9, 2007
Messages
1,851
It looks like Jim had a couple of shelves at the bottom for full boxes.
 

neilframer

PFG, Picture Framing God
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
8,043
Yes to all of it :D
I really enjoy seeing other framers' work areas. It makes me both envious of the space others have, and joyful that I am not the only messy one!
I recently got to move to a new shop space. I took the opportunity to make some changes to my moulding storage. Here's some before and after shots. (Note, I am still working on setting up the new shop. It's a work in progress.)

Old chop saw area: cluttered and cramped, length sticks on left are piled up, hard to get at and unorganized, short sticks on right the same. Mess under saw.
View attachment 34815
Hey, you've got a CTD D45AX just like the saw that I used for 14 years at a previous job.
I like the CTD saws.

We have a CTD D45 where I work now.
It's the same saw without the pneumatic pedal.
It's still a great saw, you just have to use a foot pedal like a chopper instead of the pneumatic.
I have a torn knee cartilage in my left knee so using the foot pedal is good exercise for the rehab for my knee..:thumbsup:
UFE-1621_large.jpg
 
Last edited:

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
583
Hey, you've got a CTD D45AX just like the saw that I used for 14 years at a previous job.
I like the CTD saws.

We have a CTD D45 where I work now.
It's the same saw without the pneumatic pedal.
It's still a great saw, you just have to use a foot pedal like a chopper instead of the pneumatic.
I have a torn knee cartilage in my left knee so using the foot pedal is good exercise for the rehab for my knee..:thumbsup:
View attachment 34824
Our saw is a D45 from 1991. Still works like a champ!
It's the only framing specific saw I've ever used. I sure like it.:D

When I emailed CTD to ask if they had a manual, the were happy to see this saw still in use.
I want to do some long-overdue maintenance and adjustments.
I stopped cutting aluminum over a year ago, so need to disable the auto oil cooling feature.
Sometimes that oil spatter can ruin the finish on certain mouldings, especially the linen liners.


01.jpg
 

Attachments

FrameReady Special Offer - Call 888-281-2202

nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
583
If you have a manual, and Larry doesn’t have it yet, please scan and send to him? Please!!!
They sent me 2 manuals. One for the older models like mine, and one for the newer models.
I told them about Larry's manual library, and they gave me permission to add them to his collection. :thumbsup:
They are very nice folks at CTD.
 
Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding
Top