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Opinions Wanted how best to stitch this down

Beauty, Brawn, and Brains: Wizard Z1 CMC

Matthew Hale

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Dec 5, 2015
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I've got two of these to mount. they are muslin or cotton of some sort (likely old bedsheets). we're stitching them to stretched linen. one of them is roughly 40x50; the other is roughly 80x40. they will not be framed; there will be no glazing. I've stretched the linen. the question before us all is this: do I (and by "I" I mean "anyone other than me") use a running stich around the perimeter, or do we place a few stitches across the top and one partway down each side?

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IMG_20201021_115317675.jpg
 

Zsa-Zsa

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I stopped doing projects that do not involve framing. Just took too much time to NOT sell a frame. I had people bringing me all kinds of crazy stuff to fix. If it does not involve a frame, I just say "Good luck with your project".
 

Ylva

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Even when stitching to linen, they will probably sag of there is no support in the middle. Just basing this on size and description of art. At least add batting to it, it might help.

The linen will most likely not stretch the same way as the cotton bedsheet, another source of problems to be.

It is a discussion to have with the customer and lower any expectations that it will look good in the long run.

I have framed this kind of art on bedsheets, but usually stretch them right over stretcher bars and no guarantees. Mostly tourist art.
 

Shayla

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For clarity, are those inches or centimeters?
 

Al B

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I agree with Ylva - I would stitch it across the top to secure it.
Unfortunately, I take after my dad whose famous line was "We'll do it" -( Will - who is Will find him quick). I just sat and went through a list of non-framing items I have repaired over the years - plates, bases for sculpture, sculpture, wood figurines, plaster figurines, lamps, windows, etc. People knew we fixed things, and they just dropped them off. Matthew - don't feel bad for helping people no matter how difficult - I have often wondered how I got myself into some jobs.
 
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Framar

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Hey - I make money repairing various artifacts. China, porcelain, earthenware, wood, stone - YES! I have simply learned to say "NO!" to crystal or clear glass - and yet every so often I fall for some dear old gentleman's sob story and try anyway . . . I am a real sucker for dear old gentlemen. Had to go buy rear-view mirror adhesive to reattach the handle to a Waterford Crystal dreidle. It worked!
 

Shayla

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You might contact the Columbus Museum of Art. They have Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson's art, and it would be interesting to know how similar works are handled. But, if someone suggests same-color painted magnets, I'd be careful. It's good for temporary displays, but long term use could result in uneven fading under the magnets.
 

Matthew Hale

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You might contact the Columbus Museum of Art. They have Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson's art, and it would be interesting to know how similar works are handled. But, if someone suggests same-color painted magnets, I'd be careful. It's good for temporary displays, but long term use could result in uneven fading under the magnets.
this'll make you chuckle - I'm mounting this for the CMA - it's for their upcoming exhibit of her work! I did 2 that were on translucent deerskin vellum last week. oy. if I have pics of those, I'll share.
their expectations are realistic so I'm not worried about failing there. I've got them both stitched up pretty well. I' think they came out just fine.

aminah2.jpg
As for taking orders that "aren't framing"...
IMG_20200824_085418116.jpg
... I think we all know where I stand on that subject.

Saying "no" is easy but it's no way to stay in business.
Saying "yes" to a new challenge is far more rewarding, and it could gain you a new customer for life.
 

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auntiesarahjayne

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Milwaukee, WI
I bet they look fine and will hold up well with perimeter running stitch. As suggested, if I was worried about sagging, I would spot sew down very thin batting or felt smaller than the piece, then sew the artwork above it. Fun pieces, great job!
 
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Matthew Hale

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No glazing on textile artwork? Never mind the details - just use thumbtacks, because they'll be falling apart in a couple of decades.
from what I understand, Aminah would have been just fine with that! in talking to folks at the museum, I've heard that she never could understand why folks were so precious with her artwork, when she herself was quite cavalier about the way it was handled.
 

Lafontsee

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Grand Rapids, MI
No glazing on textile artwork? Never mind the details - just use thumbtacks, because they'll be falling apart in a couple of decades.

There is an argument to be made for this. Map tacks might be a better option, though. They are small round tacks that come in a variety of colors.

James
 

Jim Miller

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from what I understand, Aminah would have been just fine with that! in talking to folks at the museum, I've heard that she never could understand why folks were so precious with her artwork, when she herself was quite cavalier about the way it was handled.
Yes, she was a delightful person and a wonderful artist, but her perceptions about materials, chemical compatibilities, and the longevity of her artworks were...let's just say unique. I met her several times and had the honor of framing several of her works for her clients. You know she lived in Columbus, Ohio, right?

Several decades from now, someone will be desperate to save what's left of her artworks, and it might be impossible.
 

Shayla

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No glazing on textile artwork? Never mind the details - just use thumbtacks, because they'll be falling apart in a couple of decades.
Since it's for a museum exhibit, they might be in protected storage for most of that twenty years.
 
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Manny Costa

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toronto
late to this but one alternative is to lay the fabric flat on museum 2ply as well as foam core (or whatever backing you use as long as you can drive a needle through) and using the O.P's photo as an example for dimensions, I'd insert 4 threads/hinges along the top of the piece. to do this you first locate as close to the edge the location to where you'd like to place the thread/hinge, roll the piece away slightly and create the hole through the mat and foam board with the needle using a small hammer. then with the thread on the needle drive it from underneath the backing, through the fabric, and hook back down through same the hole.. tie a knot over a very thin strip of matboard or portion of a toothpick so that the thread doesn't cut into the foam core and loosen over time... from there hinge along the sides. if the fabric has some wave try to find a middle ground to where to place them but keep note that you cant stretch the material flat with thread mounting. you also want to keep some of the natural waves the piece has. from there, place the bottom hinges. in terms of framing, I'd leave about 1'' float space around the art in a thin shadow box frame.
 
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