Hinging

Kittyfaces

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Kennebunk, Maine
I quickly scanned the archives and didn't see anything so see goes:

When applying Japanese hinges, I was taught to attach the narrow end of the pendant tab to the artwork. I've also seen it illustrated that way in some diagrams in books and periodicals. But then again, I see just as many illustrations that show the broad side of the pendant tab being attached to the artwork.

My insticnts tell me to use the narrow end of the tab... it offers lots of support and it's less paste on the artwork and less work for a conservator to remove them... but then again, some of the pictures I've seen in books that illustrate using the broad side of the tab are by reputable resources who certainly know more than I do... you haven't seen me publish any books on hinging...

Thanks,
Erin
 

Terry Hart cpf

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I have'nt published any books on hinging either but does that stop me from commenting? Maybe it should but for what its worth I think it's a judgement call. Most of the time I favor the horizontal hinge with just a narrow (1/8" to 1/4") paste attatched to the art. It just seems like it would be stronger and less prone to sagging. I also like to (with most pieces) space the hinges so that about 1/3 to 1/2 of the length of the edge of the paper liee between the hinges. It seems to me that the hinges too far apart leads to sagging in the middle. Of course this all changes if the piece is very delicate, very large, very cockled or very many other things. Terry
 

Cliff Wilson

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I suspect narrow/broad doesn't really matter. If the wieght of the hinge is such that it will properly tear before the artwork, it would seem that it's the width just above the paste that really matters and not how much is actually pasted .

Hey, now that you've brought up hinging ... the conservator I use here in the Worcester area asked me to apply paste to the hinge so that some of the hinge above and below the paste, but "over" the artwork has no paste. He said this helps him "get under the hinge" when removing is required. Seemed to make sense, but I hadn't seen that in any books?
 

JFeig

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Also, don't forget that paper has a grain direction. It is stronger in one direction than the other.

So, whatever shape of hinge you use,the grain should be vertical to the hinge for maximum strength.
 

Greg Fremstad

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Eugene OR
Check out the short video on the FrameTek web pages on hinging with Nori paste. This is a paper conservator (Kristen Andersen) with over 30 years experience - knows her stuff. There's a very clever method of learning just how long to wait between pasting and hinging to keep from buckling the art.
 

framanista

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Northeast US
Hold the paper up to the light and look for the chain lines. They are about one inch apart. these should run perpendicular to the edge of the paper you're attaching the hinges to.
 

preservator

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Mar 23, 2001
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Wilmington, DE
There are illustrations of hinging that can be
quite confusing. Some show hinges that go onto the
front side of the art! That is clearly wrong. If
the Japanese tissue is torn into strips that are
perpendicular to the grain direction, hinges can
be torn from that strip. If the hinges are wider
than they are long, they will give steadier support to the hinged item and will allow for
broad attachment near the edge of the sheet, without intrusion into its interior.

Hugh
 
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