Help Mounting Civil War bullets

FrameMakers

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Mar 20, 2001
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Powell, OH
I have a job in house right now that I need to mount several lead civil war bullets. The piece will be passed around in a history class. The client tells me that they tend to try to shake the items loose.

The bullets do not have ridges to restrict a monofiliament or mylar wrap. the client does not like the look of tulle, but is ok with hot melt glue or the like.

Any suggestions.

Thanks Dave
 

Rock

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Jul 15, 2004
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From
Frankfort, IN
I had the same problem with some arrowheads a while back and someone told me about Tacky Glue. I gave it a try and it worked great. After it dried, I couldn't shake any of them loose. I have mounted 2 other sets the same way so far and the customers loved the results, and some of these arrowheads were very big. I don't think I would use hot melt, as it would probably come loose eventually. (IMHO) Hope this helps.
 

Jim Miller

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Dave:

If these are cylinder-shaped, like bullets, you can probably mount them with clear film straps. But if they're just blobs of lead, forget it.

Clear film is better than any glue, if it will work. Can you cut a small "nest" hole for each of the bullets? If so, that will keep them from slipping out of the straps.

Hope that makes sense.

PS -- Just bring them in & let me mount them for you. I work cheap... :D
 

Framerguy

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Destin, Florida
Dave,

Suggest to the teacher that they carry a taser around with them as the shadowbox is passed and anyone who makes a move to shake it will ............ well, wait, that may be considered corporal punishment which is kinda frowned on today.

If the bullets are cast into a projectile shape (which I doubt) the nesting idea and Melanex strips should work fine as Jim suggested. If they are mini-balls as was common in most of the Civil War, you may be able to cut a small circular opening in the backing to nest the mini-balls in and then use Tacky or some other appropriate glue if the customer doesn't mind.

Good luck.

Framerguy
 

Jay H

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KY
Sink mat?

Ok if you’re done laughing at me now hear me out.

Cut squares out of mats (deep enough to cover the shot) slightly larger than the shot (say 25% larger.) Then make the top mat slightly smaller to hide the sink mats with a reverse bevel. The shot could then flop freely (sounds sexual doesn't it?) but stay in place.

The other plus is that the students can actually shake the frame to their hearts content. They could even shake them to see the other side of the shot. I wouldn't use UV glass but I don't think the shot would mind.

Anyway the final look would be similar to that of stamps with separate cut outs for each one.

Carry on.

Now you can laugh at me!
 

Jim Miller

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Originally posted by Jay H:
Sink mat? Cut squares out of mats (deep enough to cover the shot) slightly larger than the shot (say 25% larger.) Then make the top mat slightly smaller to hide the sink mats with a reverse bevel. The shot could then flop freely...but stay in place. Now you can laugh at me!
No laughs on this end, Jay. I think that's a great idea, especially for kids. The noise and movement would be entertaining for them. Glass could be on the back as well as the front, improving the view.

You're right about UV-filtering glass -- it would be scratched by the flopping balls. Acrylic would be better for all the handling, but it would scratch, too.
 

preservator

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Mar 23, 2001
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Wilmington, DE
The slugs are probably made of lead, which is very
chemically sensitive, so whatever structure is used to hold them, it should be made of acid-
neutral board and glue.

Hugh
 
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