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Heavy Stained Glass

Vermont Hardwoods solid wood picture frame molding

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,975
I now have two large stained glass pieces to frame for separate customers, and don’t have a clue, even having searched the G. These are heavy.

Has anyone framed pieces like these? If so, I have questions:
- do you sandwich them between glass to “firm them up”? They appear to be weak, and “wave”

- is there a certain type of frame you recommend?

- is there a simple way to see them from both sides?
 

Framar

WOW Framer
Joined
Jul 24, 2001
Messages
25,777
There are stained glass frames sold by Xylo, for one, which is flat, several widths, slightly radius edges, and a groove down the middle that fits leaded glass perfectly. Picture a fat "C" shape. You join three rails and have to screw the fourth side, after the stained glass is slid into place. These are usually hung from chains in a window so light can come through them. I have done a number of them over the years. Adding glass to the front and back would make them too thick for this groove.
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
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Nov 7, 2005
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Thanks, Mar!

Those Xylo profiles for stained glass look good and strong. Looks like I’ll be doing some finishing.

Just curious: has anyone out there used a regular molding for stained glass? Any consequences?
 
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neilframer

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Jan 27, 2010
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8,181
I have used the channeled stained glass mouldings in the past.
It's been a while but I am familiar with those mouldings.
They can work very well when you want to show both sides of the stained glass and then hang from a chain as Mar mentioned.
Mar is a great source of info on the Grumble.:thumbsup:
You Canadians....
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Joining a channel frame like that can be different.
You don't really want to use v-nails because they will show on one side.
You might want to go back to the old days and glue and vise and drill the corners on the sides or tops and bottoms and use finishing nails and then tap them in with a nail set and putty the small holes from the nails.

As far as using a regular moulding, you can use regular moulding if you can use a moulding that can be cut and joined and glued back to back with the proper spacing to get the rabbet channel that you need and then still use a chain to hang at the top.
 
Last edited:

D_Derbonne

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Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Messages
5,287
If they are weak then they may need repair.


If it's wavy, then it has likely not been constructed properly. Large pieces require reinforcement with rebar to give them stability. A frame will help but if they lead joints are not stable then the entire piece will be compromised.
Without seeing the pieces and knowing how large they are it's difficult to give an assessment.
 

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Thread starter
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Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,975
Here’s one. Tried to get it vertical, but the image flips sideways.

About 22x28. I’ll load better photos today.
 

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Hoffmann Dovetail Joining System

tedh

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
11,975
Don’t have a clue yet. I picked it up from a customer when I was dropping work off. It belongs to her friend, who hasn’t called yet to discuss what she wants done. If you like that one, you’ll be in fits of rapture when you see the other.

Had to do a search on “rapture”.

Didn’t have a clue.
 

Nikodeumus

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Apr 21, 2015
Messages
817
A few weeks ago I did a heavy stained glass, it measured about 20x40ish (don't have the specifics in front of me right now).

It was very well constructed, not "wavey" at all. So I didn't have to worry about that.
The entire piece was constructed inside a 1/4" deep lead frame, partly why it was so heavy.

We used Alto White 437510 frame. I glued and deep-set v-nailed the joints, kept it clamped until the glue was good and set.
Then I re-enforced the corners with 4-hole flat "L" brackets on the back.
I put felt padding on the brackets in case the frame might contact the window it is being hung in.
(I did not install the piece).

The customer wasn't concerned about how the back of the frame looks, it's being hung in a window about 10+ feet up, no one will see the back up close.

I used smaller angled "L" brackets to keep the stained glass in place (with foam padding between bracket and glass to minimize vibration during moving).
Luckily the design of the stained glass allowed me to place these brackets where they wouldn't be visible from the front.
The padded brackets kept the stained glass in place when I tilted and rotated the frame package, yet I could slide it with a bit of pressure with my fingers.
So I expect that any expansion/contraction cycles should be able to happen without causing stress on the glass or leading.

I used strong eye-bolts on the top rail and supplied the matching eye-bolts for fitting into the window frame.
I supplied a bunch of the heaviest copper plastic coated picture hanging wire I had (rated at 40lb?).
We discussed using a chain, but I didn't want to take responsibility for supplying something that I don't have any idea of whether it would hold the weight.
I suggested if the installer was to use something other than the wire I provided, they should be very sure of its strength (and I wouldn't be responsible if it failed).

I never do installations for anybody. I know many framers do, but I simply don't have time to leave the shop and don't want the responsibility if there was a failure.
 

wpfay

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12,299
I think both Vermont Hardwoods and Picture Woods offer a selection of stained glass frames. The channel is easy enough to modify for thicker pieces, if you have a table saw.

I have a piece of stained glass about the same size that came from a local Baptist church built prior to 1919. Baptist because there are no likenesses, AKA graven images (as with the piece shown), and pre-1919 because some of the glass that was used had colors indicating toxic chemicals were used in their production that were outlawed in 1919 (according to local architect/historian).

I used a white Studio profile (27560) and made some stop on my table saw. All unpainted parts were painted white, but the pre-finished side faces the interior. Used "D" ring strap hangers screwed to the side, and chain to hang from big screw hooks in the header of the window opening.

Deb Derbonne, who posted earlier, did the restoration and cleaning prior to framing it.
 

Shayla

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Apr 5, 2008
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31,801
If the glass seems weak, you might encourage them to get it repaire.
A few weeks ago I did a heavy stained glass, it measured about 20x40ish (don't have the specifics in front of me right now).

It was very well constructed, not "wavey" at all. So I didn't have to worry about that.
The entire piece was constructed inside a 1/4" deep lead frame, partly why it was so heavy.

We used Alto White 437510 frame. I glued and deep-set v-nailed the joints, kept it clamped until the glue was good and set.
Then I re-enforced the corners with 4-hole flat "L" brackets on the back.
I put felt padding on the brackets in case the frame might contact the window it is being hung in.
(I did not install the piece).

The customer wasn't concerned about how the back of the frame looks, it's being hung in a window about 10+ feet up, no one will see the back up close.

I used smaller angled "L" brackets to keep the stained glass in place (with foam padding between bracket and glass to minimize vibration during moving).
Luckily the design of the stained glass allowed me to place these brackets where they wouldn't be visible from the front.
The padded brackets kept the stained glass in place when I tilted and rotated the frame package, yet I could slide it with a bit of pressure with my fingers.
So I expect that any expansion/contraction cycles should be able to happen without causing stress on the glass or leading.

I used strong eye-bolts on the top rail and supplied the matching eye-bolts for fitting into the window frame.
I supplied a bunch of the heaviest copper plastic coated picture hanging wire I had (rated at 40lb?).
We discussed using a chain, but I didn't want to take responsibility for supplying something that I don't have any idea of whether it would hold the weight.
I suggested if the installer was to use something other than the wire I provided, they should be very sure of its strength (and I wouldn't be responsible if it failed).

I never do installations for anybody. I know many framers do, but I simply don't have time to leave the shop and don't want the responsibility if there was a failure.
FYI: Super Softstrand has plastic coated wire up to something like 100 lbs. Great to work with, and it can be painted with acrylic.
 

GreyDrakkon

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
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Joined
Aug 25, 2010
Messages
610
Gemini also sells a hardwood with a groove down the center in three colors. We used it for two stained glass pieces last week, the nice thing is you can ask them to make the groove different sizes depending on what you need for the stained glass. When joining, we glue the corners and before taking them out of the vices put in several nails, going from the side rails to the top and bottom rails to give the most support. The hanging system is up to the customer, we had one that wanted eyebolts in the top rail, another that wanted D-rings on the outside edges of the side rails.
 
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