Hanging art on MDF

Hannu Nystrom

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Tampere, FINLAND
Good evening folks,

Our customer has 500 big (80x130cm)canvases mounted on 8mm thick MDF. They should be installed (not by my company) in the way that the space between the wall and the board is as small as possible. I suggested Wallbuddies (small wood) and AMS security hangers but they bring the board "too far". I suggested Z-bar and that would be fine with only 3mm space, BUT Z-bar is probably "too expensive" and not easily available in Europe.
Any other fast, easy and chea...I mean affordable methods? I already suggested SIKA-hanging, but they are not allowed to do that.

- Hannu -
 

CAframer

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When we have artwork drymounted and laminated to MDF, our third party supplier uses a router to cut a "keyhole" slot in the back. This way the art work can be hung from a single screw / wall anchor.

The screw head fits within the large end of the "keyhole" and then the artwork slides across so that the screwhead is positioned in the narrower section. Cost is obviously cheap!
 

Baer Charlton

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CA, the keyhole in the ColorPlak is good up to a point. I think what Hannu is talking about is about 30"x40" or so..... to big for keyholing as the screws and weight will tear out the MDF...

But the other thing that Colorplack does, is glue a frame to the back about 15cm in from all edges... the top rail is back beveled and a matching and corrisponding piece of moulding is screwed into the wall with two screws; with the bevel raking down into the wall, so the mirror image moulding on the picture slips down into the "slot".

This forms a square block that creates a direct shearforce down on the screws instead of trying to pull the screws out of the wall.

You can also "hang" all the "French Cleats" with a laser level then go back and just pop the pictures onto the cleats. And then they will all hang straight even if they get bumped and rock.

The ones that colorplak does are 3/4" thick but I can't see a reason you couldn't rip the moulding about 3-4cm wide and the bevel 45degrees and the moulding maybe about 5-6mm thick.

It will sure make the hanging go faster. And if the cleats are about 25cm long, then they can have 3-4 screws.

If you need pictures or drawings... email me and I'll take a few pics . .
 

ERIC

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Since it has to hang so close to the wall, how about using key holes, but do them every 6-12" across the top?

They also make a metal cover to protect the keyhole opening
thumbsup.gif
and thus eliminate the possibility of them wearing out.
 

Jim Miller

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Hannu:

I suggest using mending plates. I first saw the method described on Paul Frederick's 1981 Book, "More Answers for the Framer". If you use thin plates and flathead screws, it can be quite a wall-hugging installation.

1. Attach one end of the mending plate to the back of the frame -- one on each side, where a wire would be installed.

2. Plot the spacing on the wall & install screw anchors.

3. Screw the vacant hole of one mending plate to the wall.

Rotate the frame down and up, until the first mending plate (now attached to frame and wall) is horizontal behind frame.

4. Screw the other mending plate to the wall anchor.

5. Rotate frame down until both mending plates are vertical behind frame.

1b.jpg
 

wpfay

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There is a kind of hardware used in knock-down furniture called a "modeez clip" that can be used in this application.
One half is inset into the MDF panel and the other mounts on the wall. It is similar to a keyhole style but much stronger. As the mechanism engages and gravity takes effect, the panel is naturally drawn flush to the wall.
 

Hannu Nystrom

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Thank you all for your suggestions!
The customer decided to use metal rail J-profile made of 1mm thick steel. Probably the same kind of method as Z-bar and it was easy for them to manufacture it, since they have a metal workshop. Anyway, the guy appreciated all the suggestions and was especially impressed with Jim's [Paul's] mending plate hanging method which is a very innovative technique. Although I failed to take his money this time, this kind of advisory service pays off in the future like we all know.
 

framah

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It may be a little late for this... 8mm is about it a 1/4" thick. Sounds like it is 1/4" masonite type stuff and you could have cut pinch cleats out of the same material and glued it to the back of each one and screwed the other half to the wall. it would have been 1/4" away from the wall. You wouldn't have to figure out how to attach the metal hangers they are using nor the Z-bars. A spacer of the same material along the bottom will keep it level on the wall.
 
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