Gloss Photo Images Stuck to Glass

Goodman- Ian

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Posts
4
From
Maitland - Australia - NSW
Can anyone please help?

I have an 11x14" image that has one corner stuck to the glass.

How do you remove this from the glass without destroying the emulsion of the image?

Any help will be beneficial to all who read this.
thank you.
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 6, 2001
Posts
16,932
From
Wisconsin
Ian, this is a recurring theme here - last discussed probably two weeks ago. Do a search for "don't do it!" or "stuck to glass."

Bottom line: don't do it.
 

Bill Taylor

True Grumbler
Joined
Mar 17, 2002
Posts
89
From
Waterville,Maine 04901
Ron is right, this is a recurring theme, however I can tell you I have had success removing 99% of the photos by soaking them in a pan of water for a day or so. I have done this somewhere around 20 times in 33 years.You notice that I said 99%.....that's because once it dissolved the emulsion of the photo and I ruined it. I had had the photo reproduced before I tried and the customer was made aware that it may not work. Be sure to cover all your bases. That 1% can do a lot of harm to your business. As long as the customer knows it may not work and you have a back-up reproduction, I say go for it.
Bill
 

Jack Cee

MGF, Master Grumble Framer
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Posts
666
From
Willows, CA
We have about the same record as does Bill Taylor; so be sure that the customer understands the risks involved. A liberal application of "Photo Flo" (a photographers water wetter) will help the process. It is a good feeling to remove the photo intact, dry, mount and frame the finished product. Yes, have a reproduction made.

Jack Cee
 

Goodman- Ian

Grumbler in Training
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 10, 2003
Posts
4
From
Maitland - Australia - NSW
Thank you to all who replied in a positive way.

The method I used to fix this problem was to soak the image with the glass attached with the glass side down in a paper processsing tray witha few drops of Kodak Flo to the water and move back and forth a few times when finally the glass let go, this process took around two days of Photo Flo action.

The image was a colour gloss image whaic appears to have suffered only a little damage to the emulsion.
 

Ron Eggers

SPFG, Supreme Picture Framing God
Joined
Jul 6, 2001
Posts
16,932
From
Wisconsin
I prefer to think of my response as not so much negative as conservative.

Even for the "waterproof" resin-coated papers generally used today, two days of soaking is pretty drastic.

I'd say you were lucky, but I'm glad it worked out - this time.
 
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