framing an electric guitar

Fiend

Grumbler in Training
Joined
Oct 18, 2003
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3
Location
Florida
Was wondering how I could mount an electric guitar that weighs about 10-15 lbs so that there is no noticable hardware showing and no permanent alterarion to the guitar itself. Any suggestions.
 
What kind of guitar?

If it has a strap button that faces to the back, not up, you can on screw the button to mount.

Use a solid plywood backer, put an extra piece of wood for support. Get a screw withe same thread and gauge as the button screw, except longer.
 
I build guitars and can tell you that hanging from the neck is a good idea. Make sure that the material that covers the hanger will not react poorly with the finish. Some will! Loosen the strings too. I think I would try to use the hanger and tie the guitar tight to it. Then I would tie the bottom button to the backing also. This will secure the guitar and keep it in the case and not in the floor with glass every where. Good luck. Pics pics.
 
Look at me replying to myself. I would like to add some of my thoughts on this subject. I would want to know the reason for framing the guitar. If this thing is a mint condition '59 Les Paul then it doesn't ever ever need to be framed. Even if you took all the care in the world to conserve this thing it doesn't belong in a frame. That is the wrong environment for it. However if it is a $150 special with Keith Richards autograph then the signature makes it valuable. I would recommend framing that as long as the signature won't fade.
 
Do you want to be able to take it out, use it, and put it back again? Or do you just want to permanently frame it without altering it?

If it's to come out, I suggest a Gravity Groove acrylic box and bent-rod mounts padded with shrink tubing.

If it's permanent, I suggest an acrylic box with edge-lips, and clear film straps.
 
Originally posted by Fiend:
Was wondering how I could mount an electric guitar that weighs about 10-15 lbs so that there is no noticable hardware showing and no permanent alterarion to the guitar itself. Any suggestions.
A good source for this would be the Experience Music Project in Seattle. www.emplive.com. They have a guitar gallery that is all archival quality and a staff that does this all the time. Call and ask for the group that builds exhibits. (Hope they haven't layed them all off...)

[ 02-16-2004, 12:48 PM: Message edited by: jim@wiz ]
 
What a coincidence, I just finished one! I used Frameamerica Boxers and lined them with Crescent 7114, and used Barrel hinges and a nice clasp for the latch. (The client wanted to be able to open and close it) The guitar itself is hanging from a wall-mount guitar hanger like Marc suggested. I'll take a pic of it tomorrow and post it for you.
 
Somehow or other, the time for me to edit that last post has elapsed. Anyway, here's a photo of the guitar frame.
guitarframe.jpg
 
Nice box Boggy.

Hangars are indeed easy and nice.

Back the We never did get an answer for what model or brand (and hence shape) of geet is was.

If it is a Strat, like you have pictured, there is a company that makes cases, like a regular strat vintage tweed, rectangular case, but a section of center is acrylic. It has wall hanging hardware on the back.

So as a regular geet case, it supports the geet within a cradle of foam and fabric.

I'm not sure if they make it for the LP style.

Just for those who may appreciate it, here is a pic of one of my babies.

It's a 1955 Epiphone Lefty Cutaway. That's pre-Gibson.
55EpiZephyrLeftyRegent1.JPG


Most players find it unsettling to see a guitar "backwards."
 
Seth's frame includes a feature that should be considered by anyone faced with framing a heavy
object. The frame is constructed so that the object can be easily removed. This permits the
owner to take the object out and pack it for
transit and set it back in when it arrives at
its new location. This option means that the
object can be given much more support during the
move that would be aesthetically acceptable in
a frame. Using components from the stand has
both aesthetic and physical advantages, but it
is worthwhile keeping an eye on the plastic
coverings on the holders. If they are made from
a rubber-like polymer, they may be less stable than the coverings that Jim Miller specifies
for use in his designs.

Hugh
 
That isn't a shadow box thats a "Axe Storage Unit". That is wicked awsome! Actually I am having a hard time understanding how you make the door and the back meet flush. I see the brackets you used on the corners of the door but is that a "cut out" on the box for the bracket to fit into? Or do they even meet flush? Just courious. Very good job.
 
Originally posted by Jay H:
That isn't a shadow box thats a "Axe Storage Unit". That is wicked awsome! Actually I am having a hard time understanding how you make the door and the back meet flush. I see the brackets you used on the corners of the door but is that a "cut out" on the box for the bracket to fit into? Or do they even meet flush? Just courious. Very good job.
Thanks for the kudos! The brackets were and extra precatution against frame separartion. The hasp that I used actually pulls the box closed quite securely, so the box does indeed close flush. The arms on the hanger itself are padded with neoprene, which as far as I know and have seen, doesn't degrade.

[ 02-25-2004, 11:05 PM: Message edited by: Bogframe ]
 
Originally posted by Jana:
That is a very nice job, Seth. About how much did it cost? Thanks for posting the pictures.
Cost to us was about $500 or so, we charged $1200.
The job itself took about 4 hours, all told. Once again, thanks for the kudos. I've had more than a few interesting jobs over the past few weeks; maybe I'll actually get around to downsizing some pictures and posting them. Better yet, maybe I can send them into PFM and see if Ms. Vazquez takes a shine to them as she did with last year's V-Groove articles.
 
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